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Thread: Privacy leak

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    Peter, The Machine, The Rock fireee's Avatar
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    Default Privacy leak

    Not diggin FB merging with WhatsApp, messenger, and instagram messenging all together.

    People should be switching to apps like Signal messenger... It's the only app out that isn't selling, collecting and selling your info, plus end-to-end encryption

    Remember any FB owned messaging app has no privacy, and your info could leak into the hands of future employer, etc... Yes FB is the worst when it comes to privacy.

    Either that or keep ur convos very formal.

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    ⚢ Ψ^(`∀´#)↝ object class Euclid Cybel's Avatar
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    also rec briar for mobile encryption comms
    only works on android but is metadata resistant and offers more anonymity over Signal + Telegram (no phone number or username) includes same benefits like p2p end-to-end runs on tor nodes

    online privacy is an insane rabbithole if you’re looking for the best of the best but here’s a quick simple guide to add-ons, networks, and vpns etc to reduce online printing.

    https://wiki.installgentoo.com/wiki/...ising_yourself

    and remember to support free opensource software! make stallman mommy proud

    200% terminal retardation
    fully automated vegetable corpse

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    Quote Originally Posted by onfireee View Post
    Remember any FB owned messaging app has no privacy
    Windows 10, Android / iOS have no "privacy"
    popular sites and services send the data after an ask or do "gates" for regular access
    if you give money or have relation to state organisations - you may get anything what people do by common computer devices
    Types examples: video bloggers, actors

  4. #4
    Peter, The Machine, The Rock fireee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sol View Post
    Windows 10, Android / iOS have no "privacy"***ular sites and services send the data after an ask or do "gates" for regular access
    if you give money or have relation to state organisations - you may get anything what people do by common computer devices
    yeah pretty much ... its just really annoying for ur shit to be so vulnerable, not to mention, creepy AF

    pretty sure the cybersecurity sector will be vastly popular this coming decade...
    Last edited by fireee; 08-19-2020 at 11:25 PM.

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    Peter, The Machine, The Rock fireee's Avatar
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    Examples of what might happen when u are hacked


    ***For education purposes only, these are not real life examples***


    1. When typing "snipping tool" a picture of a sniper pops up instead:






    2. Your computer is just covered in shit:




    3. You get sucked off. Hard. Your files will be sucked away to OneDrive/iCloud. Anything you try to capture will be sent there too.

    'Celebgate' iCloud hack perpetrator sentenced to 34 months in prison


    4. other creepy shit:





    The takeaway: Don't hack unless u wanna chill w some rats in prison
    Last edited by fireee; 08-21-2020 at 10:14 PM.

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    Peter, The Machine, The Rock fireee's Avatar
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    6 Ways to Prepare for Hacking Attacks

    Hackers have broken into billions of accounts throughout the years. It is not altogether unlikely that you have been personally affected by one of these attacks.

    You don’t have to be a cybersecurity expert to prepare yourself from hackers. It’s much easier to protect your data, your identity, or your company than you may think.

    Thankfully, there are a few resources that will help you create unbreakable passwords, find out whether or not any of your personal accounts have been hacked, and update existing software. Cybersecurity strategies can also help you prepare for hacks and protect yourself.

    Here are 6 surefire ways to defend yourself from hacking attacks:

    1. Read pressing cybersecurity news

    Staying informed about the latest breaches, bugs, and bots will help you defend yourself and even prevent potential hacking attempts.

    2. Check if you’ve been compromised

    The website HaveIBeenPwned.com allows users to put in account information, such as an email address. HaveIBeenPwned checks its database of millions of accounts. If your account turns up, then it’s been compromised.

    If you happen to have a compromised account, you’ll want to change your password as soon as possible. In addition, you’ll want to keep a lookout for any suspicious activity for a few months.

    3. Create strong, unique passwords

    Passwords are the easiest ways to defend ourselves from hacking attempts. There are simple and effective password strategies that can make your account unbreakable.

    The most effective passwords are:

    Unique for every account
    At least 8-12 characters long
    A mixture of numbers, letters, and special characters (like ‘!’, ‘@’, and ‘&’)
    A mixture of lowercase and capital letters
    One trick for remembering strong passwords is to create a sentence or meaningful phrase out of the password. So, for example, g00D7Hinkn5!, could be referred to by the phrase “good thinking!”

    4. Use a password manager

    Password managers take a good chunk of the work out of protecting yourself from hacking attempts. Password managers like LastPass take the guesswork and the grunt work out of creating, storing, and changing your passwords.

    With password managers, you can keep all of your passwords in one encrypted location. You’ll never have to enter in your passwords again (save for the master password you use for the manager). You can even generate strong passwords and rotate them automatically so you don’t even have to keep coming up with passwords on your own.

    5. Enable two-factor authentication

    For important accounts, like your professional or personal email accounts, for example, you can add two-factor authentication. What does this mean? Two-factor authentication provides users with two walls to their accounts instead of just one.

    How does two-factor authentication typically work? After entering your password, your phone will receive a secure SMS. This text message will contain something like six-digit code. You are then prompted to enter the code into your web browser. Only after entering the code will access to your account be granted.

    6. Update software regularly

    Software almost always has bugs, holes, or backdoors. No matter how new a software product may be, there are always exploitable elements. Luckily, software developers are aware of this and have a few measures to fight against these unexpected errors.

    Software updates patch software issues. For this reason, it’s of the utmost importance to consistently check for updates. The more outdated your software, the more likely it is hackers will exploit it. Update your software regularly to minimize risk.

    Conclusion

    Malicious hacking is now a part of everyday life. There’s no reason to panic, however, since there are many ways to prevent breaches and minimize the impact of successful hacks.

    Staying informed is one of the easiest ways to protect yourself against cyber attacks. Reading security news can impart new methods and strategies for dealing with threats as well as keep you abreast on the latest issues.

    Be sure to check if you’ve been compromised in the past. It’s best to simply face past hacking attacks and work to reduce the risk of further intrusion. Use HaveIBeenPwned.com to assess whether or not you’ve been hacked in the past.

    Source: https://hakin9.org/6-ways-to-prepare...cking-attacks/

  7. #7
    Peter, The Machine, The Rock fireee's Avatar
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    I used a password (which happens to be the one I use on THIS SITE) to test and this popped up:



    What. The. Fuck.

    Lol

  8. #8
    Peter, The Machine, The Rock fireee's Avatar
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    Here's one i got simply from trying to access wikisocion:

    Rogue.TechSupportScam

    Short bio

    Rogue.TechSupportScam is Malwarebytes’ generic detection for programs that are installed with the objective of getting the affected system’s user to call a tech support scammer telephone numbers. Users usually fall victim to buying overpriced services and software.

    It's gone now but it looked innocent like this:



    not there on google anymore
    Last edited by fireee; 08-21-2020 at 08:35 PM.

  9. #9
    Haikus
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    wtf is this thread.

  10. #10
    Haikus
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    Quote Originally Posted by onfireee View Post
    Lol, ya k.

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