Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Exercise research

  1. #1
    Enlightened Hedonist
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    18,039
    Mentioned
    427 Post(s)
    Tagged
    4 Thread(s)

    Default Exercise research

    If you know about any interesting exercise research, or find any, post it here!

    There is the wikipedia page:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exercise

    which cites this paper in a table:

    Egan, B. and Zierath, J.R., 2013. Exercise metabolism and the molecular regulation of skeletal muscle adaptation. Cell metabolism, 17(2), pp.162-184. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cmet.2012.12.012

    The sort of questions I'm interested in personally are:

    What is the optimal amount of exercise to do for the health benefits (i.e. fitness, quality of life, longevity), in terms of time and energy?

    What are the best (or alternatively, simplest) exercises to do?

    What are effective exercises to do with a minimum amount of effort? What exercises can be done when engaged doing something else? (for example, using an exercise pedal).

  2. #2
    ouronis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    TIM
    ref to ptr to self
    Posts
    2,724
    Mentioned
    118 Post(s)
    Tagged
    2 Thread(s)

    Default

    Benefits of cardiovascular fitness:
    https://www.ntnu.edu/cerg/vo2max

    How much exercise to offset sitting:
    https://bjsm.bmj.com/content/54/24/1499

  3. #3
    BIG SHOT
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    USA
    TIM
    ESI-Fi 6w5 sp/sx
    Posts
    377
    Mentioned
    15 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Subteigh View Post
    What is the optimal amount of exercise to do for the health benefits (i.e. fitness, quality of life, longevity), in terms of time and energy?
    Cardio has tons of benefits.

    Quote Originally Posted by Subteigh View Post
    What are the best (or alternatively, simplest) exercises to do?
    Best? Depends on your goals. Simplest? You can always do bodyweight exercises. Push-ups, pull-ups, squats, and planks.

    Quote Originally Posted by Subteigh View Post
    What are effective exercises to do with a minimum amount of effort? What exercises can be done when engaged doing something else? (for example, using an exercise pedal).
    Depends on your perception of effort. Strength training with barbells requires focus so you don't get hurt but can be short and easy. Jogging, you can listen to music during but, for me, is more a pain in the ass.

  4. #4
    Enlightened Hedonist
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    18,039
    Mentioned
    427 Post(s)
    Tagged
    4 Thread(s)

    Default

    There's this pdf file that has where people rank by age in terms of push-ups, sit-ups, and 1.5 miles runs: http://nlcja.com/files/Cooper%20Scale.pdf

    I don't know if that is actually reliable data for the whole of society, but I have found it to be a useful motivator.

  5. #5
    Enlightened Hedonist
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    18,039
    Mentioned
    427 Post(s)
    Tagged
    4 Thread(s)

    Default

    Paluch, A.E., Gabriel, K.P., Fulton, J.E., Lewis, C.E., Schreiner, P.J., Sternfeld, B., Sidney, S., Siddique, J., Whitaker, K.M. and Carnethon, M.R., 2021. Steps per Day and All-Cause Mortality in Middle-aged Adults in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Study. JAMA network open, 4(9), pp.e2124516-e2124516
    https://doi.org/10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2021.24516

    Key Points

    Question Are step volume or intensity associated with premature mortality among middle-aged Black and White women and men?

    Findings In this cohort study of 2110 adults with a mean follow-up of 10.8 years, participants taking at least 7000 steps/d, compared with those taking fewer than 7000 steps/d, had a 50% to 70% lower risk of mortality. There was no association of step intensity with mortality regardless of adjustment for step volume.

    Meaning This cohort study found that higher daily step volume was associated with a lower risk of premature all-cause mortality among Black and White middle-aged women and men.
    Abstract

    Importance Steps per day is a meaningful metric for physical activity promotion in clinical and population settings. To guide promotion strategies of step goals, it is important to understand the association of steps with clinical end points, including mortality.

    Objective To estimate the association of steps per day with premature (age 41-65 years) all-cause mortality among Black and White men and women.

    Design, Setting, and Participants This prospective cohort study was part of the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study. Participants were aged 38 to 50 years and wore an accelerometer from 2005 to 2006. Participants were followed for a mean (SD) of 10.8 (0.9) years. Data were analyzed in 2020 and 2021.

    Exposure Daily steps volume, classified as low (<7000 steps/d), moderate (7000-9999 steps/d), and high (≥10 000 steps/d) and stepping intensity, classified as peak 30-minute stepping rate and time spent at 100 steps/min or more.

    Main Outcomes and Measures All-cause mortality.

    Results A total of 2110 participants from the CARDIA study were included, with a mean (SD) age of 45.2 (3.6) years, 1205 (57.1%) women, 888 (42.1%) Black participants, and a median (interquartile range [IQR]) of 9146 (7307-11 162) steps/d. During 22 845 person years of follow-up, 72 participants (3.4%) died. Using multivariable adjusted Cox proportional hazards models, compared with participants in the low step group, there was significantly lower risk of mortality in the moderate (hazard ratio [HR], 0.28 [95% CI, 0.15-0.54]; risk difference [RD], 53 [95% CI, 27-78] events per 1000 people) and high (HR, 0.45 [95% CI, 0.25-0.81]; RD, 41 [95% CI, 15-68] events per 1000 people) step groups. Compared with the low step group, moderate/high step rate was associated with reduced risk of mortality in Black participants (HR, 0.30 [95% CI, 0.14-0.63]) and in White participants (HR, 0.37 [95% CI, 0.17-0.81]). Similarly, compared with the low step group, moderate/high step rate was associated with reduce risk of mortality in women (HR, 0.28 [95% CI, 0.12-0.63]) and men (HR, 0.42 [95% CI, 0.20-0.88]). There was no significant association between peak 30-minute intensity (lowest vs highest tertile: HR, 0.98 [95% CI, 0.54-1.77]) or time at 100 steps/min or more (lowest vs highest tertile: HR, 1.38 [95% CI, 0.73-2.61]) with risk of mortality.

    Conclusions and Relevance This cohort study found that among Black and White men and women in middle adulthood, participants who took approximately 7000 steps/d or more experienced lower mortality rates compared with participants taking fewer than 7000 steps/d. There was no association of step intensity with mortality.

  6. #6
    Enlightened Hedonist
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    18,039
    Mentioned
    427 Post(s)
    Tagged
    4 Thread(s)

    Default

    Hall, K.S., Hyde, E.T., Bassett, D.R., Carlson, S.A., Carnethon, M.R., Ekelund, U., Evenson, K.R., Galuska, D.A., Kraus, W.E., Lee, I.M. and Matthews, C.E., 2020. Systematic review of the prospective association of daily step counts with risk of mortality, cardiovascular disease, and dysglycemia. International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 17(1), pp.1-14.
    https://doi.org/10.1186/s12966-020-00978-9

    Abstract
    Background

    Daily step counts is an intuitive metric that has demonstrated success in motivating physical activity in adults and may hold potential for future public health physical activity recommendations. This review seeks to clarify the pattern of the associations between daily steps and subsequent all-cause mortality, cardiovascular disease (CVD) morbidity and mortality, and dysglycemia, as well as the number of daily steps needed for health outcomes.
    Methods

    A systematic review was conducted to identify prospective studies assessing daily step count measured by pedometer or accelerometer and their associations with all-cause mortality, CVD morbidity or mortality, and dysglycemia (dysglycemia or diabetes incidence, insulin sensitivity, fasting glucose, HbA1c). The search was performed across the Medline, Embase, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Library databases from inception to August 1, 2019. Eligibility criteria included longitudinal design with health outcomes assessed at baseline and subsequent timepoints; defining steps per day as the exposure; reporting all-cause mortality, CVD morbidity or mortality, and/or dysglycemia outcomes; adults ≥18 years old; and non-patient populations.
    Results

    Seventeen prospective studies involving over 30,000 adults were identified. Five studies reported on all-cause mortality (follow-up time 4–10 years), four on cardiovascular risk or events (6 months to 6 years), and eight on dysglycemia outcomes (3 months to 5 years). For each 1000 daily step count increase at baseline, risk reductions in all-cause mortality (6–36%) and CVD (5–21%) at follow-up were estimated across a subsample of included studies. There was no evidence of significant interaction by age, sex, health conditions or behaviors (e.g., alcohol use, smoking status, diet) among studies that tested for interactions. Studies examining dysglycemia outcomes report inconsistent findings, partially due to heterogeneity across studies of glycemia-related biomarker outcomes, analytic approaches, and sample characteristics.
    Conclusions

    Evidence from longitudinal data consistently demonstrated that walking an additional 1000 steps per day can help lower the risk of all-cause mortality, and CVD morbidity and mortality in adults, and that health benefits are present below 10,000 steps per day. However, the shape of the dose-response relation is not yet clear. Data are currently lacking to identify a specific minimum threshold of daily step counts needed to obtain overall health benefit.

  7. #7
    Number 9 large's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    Baking bread
    TIM
    ESTp 7w8 Aries Sp/Sx
    Posts
    4,397
    Mentioned
    244 Post(s)
    Tagged
    2 Thread(s)

    Default

    this is what real Te looks like @Adam Strange
    ~ ESTP ~ SLE ~ 7w8 ~ Sp/Sx ~ Fire ~ Aries ~ Beta ~ Gryffindor ~ Summer ~ SLUEN ~

  8. #8
    Enlightened Hedonist
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    18,039
    Mentioned
    427 Post(s)
    Tagged
    4 Thread(s)

    Default

    Althoff, T., Hicks, J.L., King, A.C., Delp, S.L. and Leskovec, J., 2017. Large-scale physical activity data reveal worldwide activity inequality. Nature, 547(7663), pp.336-339.

    Abstract

    Understanding the basic principles that govern physical activity is needed to curb the global pandemic of physical inactivity1–7 and the 5.3 million deaths per year associated with in-activity2. Our knowledge, however, remains limited owing to the lack of large-scale measurements of physical activity patterns across free-living populations worldwide1, 6. Here, we leverage the wide usage of smartphones with built-in accelerometry to measure physical activity at planetary scale. We study a dataset consisting of 68 million days of physical activity for 717,527 people, giving us a window into activity in 111 countries across the globe. We find inequality in how activity is distributed within countries and that this inequality is a better predictor of obesity prevalence in the population than average activity volume. Reduced activity in females contributes to a large portion of the observed activity inequality. Aspects of the built environment, such as the walkability of a city, were associated with less gender gap in activity and activity inequality. In more walkable cities, activity is greater throughout the day and throughout the week, across age, gender, and body mass index (BMI) groups, with the greatest increases in activity for females. Our findings have implications for global public health policy and urban planning and highlight the role of activity inequality and the built environment for improving physical activity and health.

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •