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Thread: Dermatillomania linked to Si?

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    Default Dermatillomania linked to Si?

    Are dermatillomania and trichotillomania linked to Si ego types? From experience alone, I believe they might be.


    Excoriation disorder is defined as "repetitive and compulsive picking of skin which results in tissue damage". Its most official name had been "dermatillomania"

    A pair of studies published in 2017 and 2018 were the first to report that individuals with BFRBs have higher rates of sensory over-responsivity to external sensations than the general population. In other words, they respond intensely to things like sounds and textures.
    “It would appear that pulling might therefore be an external attempt on the part of a genetically prone individual to regulate an internal state of sensory imbalance,” he writes.

    According to this model, a person with a BFRB is exposed to the same levels of environmental stimulation as others, but their nervous system is unable to easily manage it. “It is as if the person is standing in the centre of a seesaw, or on a high-wire, with overstimulation on one side, and understimulation on the other, and must lean in either direction (by pulling) at different times, to remain balanced,” he writes.

    Source: https://scroll.in/pulse/891883/why-d...-and-untreated


    On that thought, I’ll say Si could also be involved in the development of more temporary afflictions such as pica as well as in habits like rubbing certain fabrics repeatedly. An offshoot from the same inclination: petting cats or dogs in a special way (and often intrusively) because of an obsession with their fur (poor souls).

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    I would guess it is linked to low-dimensional, mental Si. I understand the point about "individuals with BFRBs have higher rates of sensory over-responsivity to external sensations than the general population" suggests the affected individuals have strong Si or S in general; but I would suggest it's actually weak, but mental Si over which the person has become neurotic, which leads to the over-responsiveness.

    That's just my guess, though. I think your initial guess of this being linked to Si egos is also plausible. And Si egos still have mental Si, so it's possible to become neurotic then, too.

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    I need to have my blood taken periodically. Because of medical treatment, my veins are mush. So they told me it'd be a good idea to manipulate a stress ball for some days prior to the extraction to bring them out. That bugger didn't even last a week with me. I couldn’t resist tearing it to pieces, so good the texture and ripping it felt. When I was younger I would step on pieces of concrete, hard, the sound the smell they gave out when turning into dust so exhilarating. I still catch myself doing that from time to time. I’ve also experienced the intense desire to eat earth, flour, rolled washing cloth and cement and bite deep into wool, because the smell and shape of them gave a strong impression of their taste to me. I actually went through a period of eating chalk. I believe these are some examples of how “ensory over-responsivity to external sensations” can present themselves, plus the obligatory "my clothes feel funny" argument which is mentioned in the article and has been used countless times to exemplify strong Si. Dermatillomania sounds like an extension of the same+ anxiety.

    The case of pica is interesting. Sometimes it can be an external manifestation of an individual’s lack of minerals in the system and anemia. A couple of months after my irrational chalk-eating phase I was hospitalized and, what do you know, I was diagnosed with anemia. I wonder if the desire to compensate with non-nutritious food appears indistinctively or if it is more likely to surface in individuals who have a deeper relationship to o texture or imagined flavours (strong sensory imagination) so the need to ingest these substances is more aptly signalled by the brain.
    Last edited by Rusal; 03-19-2020 at 08:08 AM.

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