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Thread: Limits of bodily autonomy

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    Moderator xerx's Avatar
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    Default Limits of bodily autonomy

    What, if anything, should you be banned from doing with your body?

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    Poptart's Avatar
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    You should be banned from interfering with certain parts of your body, if you’re in public.

    Other than that I don’t care.

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    The Morning Star EUDAEMONIUM's Avatar
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    This is a really hard question for me to answer.

    For example, you could say that people are free to do as they please as long as it doesn't hurt anyone.

    But what if someone is hurting themselves? What if they try to commit suicide? Should we stop them or allow them?

    If you say they should be allowed to hurt or even kill themselves if they like, where does this stop? For example, if a mentally ill person is hurting themselves is it a violation of their autonomy to prevent that and treat them?

    If you say that is allowable, where would this stop. You could then use that as an excuse to force people to do anything you deem to be in the best interest of their health. If this person disagrees they are deemed "mentally ill".

    If you say you shouldn't treat a mentally ill person out of respect to their autonomy, they will kill themselves, and you are left with a country of untreated mentally ill people injuring and killing themselves.


    I can't actually think of a definitive answer to this.
    The Barnum or Forer effect is the tendency for people to judge that general, universally valid statements about personality are actually specific descriptions of their own personalities. A "universally valid" statement is one that is true of everyone—or, more likely, nearly everyone. It is not known why people tend to make such misjudgments, but the effect has been experimentally reproduced.

    The psychologist Paul Meehl named this fallacy "the P.T. Barnum effect" because Barnum built his circus and dime museum on the principle of having something for everyone. It is also called "the Forer effect" after its discoverer, the psychologist Bertram R. Forer, who modestly dubbed it "the fallacy of personal validation".

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    persimmonism's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eudaimonia View Post
    This is a really hard question for me to answer.

    For example, you could say that people are free to do as they please as long as it doesn't hurt anyone.

    But what if someone is hurting themselves? What if they try to commit suicide? Should we stop them or allow them?

    If you say they should be allowed to hurt or even kill themselves if they like, where does this stop? For example, if a mentally ill person is hurting themselves is it a violation of their autonomy to prevent that and treat them?

    If you say that is allowable, where would this stop. You could then use that as an excuse to force people to do anything you deem to be in the best interest of their health. If this person disagrees they are deemed "mentally ill".

    If you say you shouldn't treat a mentally ill person out of respect to their autonomy, they will kill themselves, and you are left with a country of untreated mentally ill people injuring and killing themselves.


    I can't actually think of a definitive answer to this.
    Great points. Yeah.. it gets tricky in situations like this site's topic (questioning medicalization of gender dysphoria) for example

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