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Thread: Math and Socionics Type

  1. #41
    Aramas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by one View Post
    Yes.


    I don't have a consistent hobby too. When I want to do something for fun, I just do it. If I get bored with it, I stop doing it. After a while I come back to them one by one anyway. I notice some people are consistent with their hobbies and they thrive when they have a routine. But for some people it's just not realistic because their mood changes a lot or they have a variety of things they want to try. I think for the latter doing things on the fly and pursuing an activity based on mood is better. If you push yourself to a routine, there will be a disconnect between your actions and your mood which makes you sad/anxious. And you will most likely end up not doing anything, e.g. you want to try pottery, but no you can't do that because you should be practicing how to draw every Sunday. That's your routine now. Well good luck because the whole routine just makes doing it extra depressing. Better eat junk and watch TV to ease discomfort.

    I think it's scary to do the latter though, because of our idea that we should be achieving some random goal and it would feel like you're drifting in life. But I notice in myself that I would normally try and read up on random unrelated things. Sometimes there will be no output at all from these things. But after a while I would have a eureka moment as I would be able to find the relation of these things to one another. That is when it will all make sense. Everything will be done after sometime, and then it's like I'll be entering another phase in life again (It's like the meaning of The World card in tarot if you're familiar with it.). It takes a lot more time compared to just focusing on one thing but I'd rather die than focus on one thing in life.

    So I guess for others, it's their natural inclination to maintain a hobby because it's their job to master what is already existing. But for others, they unconsciously seek different types of activities because what they're good at is synthesizing information.

    It's also akin to:

    vs


    Those are my thoughts and experiences on it, but you might want to find out yourself what works for you.
    Who knows, maybe my interest in True Blood will be useful someday.

    I've been rewatching the series and I just found out that they're doing a reboot so that's kind of a funny coincidence.

  2. #42
    pronounced " " Nobody's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chin Diaper 007 View Post
    Heh Gulenko's cognitive styles describe academic text booky material as causal deterministic. That said it tends look bit too clear to me. One LII commented my writing: your writing style reminds me of academic papers.
    Yeah, I guess I always had the habit of looking too far into what I'm learning and then getting really confused and feeling like I'm just memorizing stuff to get by, but not really learning. I suppose if I just take it for what it is, it would be easy. But I don't think my mind is satisfied with that.

    I actually had an engineering class where the professor said not to try and understand the material because even he couldn't (and he was PHD with tenure); suffice to say that everyone failed that class, but he had to grade on a curve so a majority passed anyway. I stopped going halfway out of lack of interest and retook the class another time, but it didn't seem to help much. In reflection after university, I've been really interested in quantum physics and how it related to electrical engineering and now it all makes a very intuitive sense. I wish I had the wisdom to spend time working and studying things on my own and maybe going to university later; it would have been a breeze.
    Now I realize there is a huge disconnect in academia where they focus on teaching formulaic understanding (causal deterministic?) over trying to represent a whole picture of things to students, which I just "need" for some reason or I don't know what decisions to take because my mind can't truly rest; sometimes I think academics are afraid to present theories or conceptualizations that might not be completely right because society and academia seems to like punishing people for being wrong. So we just get the pure formulas and if someone is really good at reading between the formulas/lines, then they are "genius" and if they do some science breakthroughs maybe some of their intuition becomes accepted theory. It's like society wants people to be just smart enough and just stupid enough, but nothing more or less. It's really...uninspiring? I think the human race could be soooo much better than we are, but I suppose it can't really happen, if society doesn't actually value that.
    Or maybe I'm wrong about everything. But it doesn't seem so.
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    Quote Originally Posted by YXPR View Post
    I cried once during a math class.
    even ppl who love math might cry in math, just fyi. Like an actor might cry during a theater production, etc


    Cry. To quote Will Smith, "Ain't no shame in it." Crying people recover more quickly from stressful scenarios than people who don't cry. So, it just makes sense to cry.
    Last edited by nanashi; 01-20-2021 at 02:25 AM.
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    I wonder what each type might love about math.


    For me, I've enjoyed what I experience as a truth in it.


    There is a sense of beauty and timelessness in it.

    I grew up with bohemian artists, and a lot of things like poetry left me dissatisfied. They were nebulous and highly specialized for one scenario and maybe even one subset of people, and not straightforward, which I struggled with. I gained patience and would ask for what they meant when writing it or what the point was. And some would relay one while others wanted it to be a 'choose your own adventure,' explorative thought piece, which is fine but not what I craved as a kid. I wanted non-fiction.


    And I'm really interested in math's applicability/helpfulness/usefulness as a tool/resource. And I like this quality of reliability and structure. You can build using it.

    tangent epilogue: I've since become appreciative of fiction. There's a lot of research on how it develops humans.
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    a two horned unicorn renegade Chin Diaper 007's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nobody View Post
    Yeah, I guess I always had the habit of looking too far into what I'm learning and then getting really confused and feeling like I'm just memorizing stuff to get by, but not really learning. I suppose if I just take it for what it is, it would be easy. But I don't think my mind is satisfied with that.

    I actually had an engineering class where the professor said not to try and understand the material because even he couldn't (and he was PHD with tenure); suffice to say that everyone failed that class, but he had to grade on a curve so a majority passed anyway. I stopped going halfway out of lack of interest and retook the class another time, but it didn't seem to help much. In reflection after university, I've been really interested in quantum physics and how it related to electrical engineering and now it all makes a very intuitive sense. I wish I had the wisdom to spend time working and studying things on my own and maybe going to university later; it would have been a breeze.
    Now I realize there is a huge disconnect in academia where they focus on teaching formulaic understanding (causal deterministic?) over trying to represent a whole picture of things to students, which I just "need" for some reason or I don't know what decisions to take because my mind can't truly rest; sometimes I think academics are afraid to present theories or conceptualizations that might not be completely right because society and academia seems to like punishing people for being wrong. So we just get the pure formulas and if someone is really good at reading between the formulas/lines, then they are "genius" and if they do some science breakthroughs maybe some of their intuition becomes accepted theory. It's like society wants people to be just smart enough and just stupid enough, but nothing more or less. It's really...uninspiring? I think the human race could be soooo much better than we are, but I suppose it can't really happen, if society doesn't actually value that.
    Or maybe I'm wrong about everything. But it doesn't seem so.
    Holographical thinking might be very useful in structural chemistry and stuff. Never appreciated those cubes so much although I lacked aversion.
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    I agree that math is probably most interesting for Ti and NT types. I never liked math much, I could do well enough to get my MSc. degree in engineering but I never really enjoyed it. It was just too abstract, too removed from the real world and requiring too much memorization and boring pen and paper practice exercises. Any kind of applied math was more interesting, as was geometry. Calculus was the worst I think. Understanding the principles wasn't too hard and instead of practicing how to solve problems I could usually guess in the exam what kind of formula was required for a specific kind of problem and more or less guess my way through. I was content with barely passing grades if it meant that I didn't have to sit and solve math problems, it was just too boring. The ones who actually were excited by math were usually Alpha NTs.

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    My dad is LSE and he loves maths and always used to help me with maths homework. hes an engineer.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Northstar View Post
    I agree that math is probably most interesting for Ti and NT types. I never liked math much, I could do well enough to get my MSc. degree in engineering but I never really enjoyed it. It was just too abstract, too removed from the real world and requiring too much memorization and boring pen and paper practice exercises. Any kind of applied math was more interesting, as was geometry. Calculus was the worst I think. Understanding the principles wasn't too hard and instead of practicing how to solve problems I could usually guess in the exam what kind of formula was required for a specific kind of problem and more or less guess my way through. I was content with barely passing grades if it meant that I didn't have to sit and solve math problems, it was just too boring. The ones who actually were excited by math were usually Alpha NTs.
    we should teach math with a LOT more application and movement and real-world problem-solving
    ENTj-Ni sx/so

  9. #49
    Decisive Queen StarPath's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Number 9 large View Post
    My dad is LSE and he loves maths and always used to help me with maths homework. hes an engineer.
    A LSE-Si that I know is excellent at math.
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  10. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by nanashi View Post
    we should teach math with a LOT more application and movement and real-world problem-solving
    I couldn't agree more! I learn math better when it is connected to a scientific discipline than when it is just by itself.
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