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Thread: Dermatillomania linked to Si?

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    Default Dermatillomania linked to Si?

    Are dermatillomania and trichotillomania linked to Si ego types? From experience alone, I believe they might be.


    Excoriation disorder is defined as "repetitive and compulsive picking of skin which results in tissue damage". Its most official name had been "dermatillomania"

    A pair of studies published in 2017 and 2018 were the first to report that individuals with BFRBs have higher rates of sensory over-responsivity to external sensations than the general population. In other words, they respond intensely to things like sounds and textures.
    “It would appear that pulling might therefore be an external attempt on the part of a genetically prone individual to regulate an internal state of sensory imbalance,” he writes.

    According to this model, a person with a BFRB is exposed to the same levels of environmental stimulation as others, but their nervous system is unable to easily manage it. “It is as if the person is standing in the centre of a seesaw, or on a high-wire, with overstimulation on one side, and understimulation on the other, and must lean in either direction (by pulling) at different times, to remain balanced,” he writes.

    Source: https://scroll.in/pulse/891883/why-d...-and-untreated


    On that thought, I’ll say Si could also be involved in the development of more temporary afflictions such as pica as well as in habits like rubbing certain fabrics repeatedly. An offshoot from the same inclination: petting cats or dogs in a special way (and often intrusively) because of an obsession with their fur (poor souls).

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    I would guess it is linked to low-dimensional, mental Si. I understand the point about "individuals with BFRBs have higher rates of sensory over-responsivity to external sensations than the general population" suggests the affected individuals have strong Si or S in general; but I would suggest it's actually weak, but mental Si over which the person has become neurotic, which leads to the over-responsiveness.

    That's just my guess, though. I think your initial guess of this being linked to Si egos is also plausible. And Si egos still have mental Si, so it's possible to become neurotic then, too.

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    I need to have my blood taken periodically. Because of medical treatment, my veins are mush. So they told me it'd be a good idea to manipulate a stress ball for some days prior to the extraction to bring them out. That bugger didn't even last a week with me. I couldn’t resist tearing it to pieces, so good the texture and ripping it felt. When I was younger I would step on pieces of concrete, hard, the sound the smell they gave out when turning into dust so exhilarating. I still catch myself doing that from time to time. I’ve also experienced the intense desire to eat earth, flour, rolled washing cloth and cement and bite deep into wool, because the smell and shape of them gave a strong impression of their taste to me. I actually went through a period of eating chalk. I believe these are some examples of how “ensory over-responsivity to external sensations” can present themselves, plus the obligatory "my clothes feel funny" argument which is mentioned in the article and has been used countless times to exemplify strong Si. Dermatillomania sounds like an extension of the same+ anxiety.

    The case of pica is interesting. Sometimes it can be an external manifestation of an individual’s lack of minerals in the system and anemia. A couple of months after my irrational chalk-eating phase I was hospitalized and, what do you know, I was diagnosed with anemia. I wonder if the desire to compensate with non-nutritious food appears indistinctively or if it is more likely to surface in individuals who have a deeper relationship to o texture or imagined flavours (strong sensory imagination) so the need to ingest these substances is more aptly signalled by the brain.
    Last edited by Rusal; 03-19-2020 at 08:08 AM.

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    I have this. and my finger chewing isn't entirely related to physical sensation. But because the way the skin is already cracked and split bothers me, both the physical sensation and the physical appearance. So I engage in the counterproductive project of fixing the problem by chewing my fingers into having less bothersome, prickly wounds. To smooth them out. The fact that this will just make the problem worse is the furthest thing from my mind while I'm doing it.

    Story of my life really, so if it can be typed it would mean something

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    I have read that it can be a symptom of body dysmorphic disorder (people often have both disorders at the same time). And I have experienced both (skin picking and likely body dysmorphic disorder). I also have relatively high anxiety. And had acne as a teen. And grew up around ESE mother who seemed to have a fixation on female beauty (also would say not so nice things about my appearance when we argued). Therapist said that my mother’s mistake was that she didn’t apologise about saying these things. I guess she didn’t really realise she needed to :/

    Of course, I did not feel like I could go to my mother about the ‘image’ related problems I experienced..this is how it seemed at the time.

    Could also be connected to recreational drug use I believe. (It can replicate the anxiety-less state one finds themselves in when high). Even though if is a very different feeling to being high.

    Everything is connected
    Last edited by Bethany; 04-01-2021 at 08:12 PM.
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    I do a lot of stimming which involves touching a mole on my collarbone. I don't pick to where I hurt my skin.

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    it's neurotic harming own body. more chance it's more met among Ni types

    > From experience alone, I believe they might be.

    This needs significant number of people with different and correctly identified types, to say about types predispositions based on an experience. Not a couple of case, especially with common accuracy problem.
    Types examples: video bloggers, actors

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    Skin picking commenced with the development of an eating disorder years back. I mention that because Bethany raised the subject of BDD, which I still have. I relate to a lot of the thoughts Bethany shares here, and wonder if there is an enneagram connection.

    There are callouses formed in my finger webs and as there is no open wound (harm caused to myself) and no harm caused to others, I see no reason to stop the picking.

    Have thought it could relate to anxiety - good or bad.
    I engage in picking when: deep in concentration, idle, the outlook is fine. Sure, it accelerates when I am vacillating but put on the spot to take action.

    The act of picking could be a cathartic and grounding motion, as the strong skin sensation brings you back to your body

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    I have trichotillomania, but I've finally got a pretty good hold on it after 2-3 yrs struggling. I also used to bite around my nails really bad. I used to pick at my scalp as a kid too.

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    I've never picked my skin but I understand the fidgetiness and wanting to tear things apart just for the sensation. Weirdly enough, I've seen a lot of dogs endlessly eat at their leg until the skin is showing through and raw.
    I can't put my finger on what this is besides a preoccupation with sense due to grooming instincts gone wrong. There's a lot of things mixed in with this, like wanting to take a "complete breath" like breathe as deeply as possible to elicit a flood of satisfaction or to scratch an itch endlessly to make it go away (but of course it just gets worse). So we are kind of like abusing feedback circuits that begin with triggers ingrained with us by pressing the lever like a rat that has learned how to get food

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    Skin picking started as a habit, and turned into a compulsion/addiction. It’s under control now. I’m just more aware now if I do it, and don’t feel like it’s in control of me. Don’t feel worried about it as a problem anymore.

    I found that the longer you do it for, the deeper you are pulled into the hypnotic state it produces..the harder it is to stop. Doing it kind of made me go deeper into my thoughts, thoughts were ‘louder’ and a bit more abstract. Sometimes, there were no thoughts. But with an awareness that there were no thoughts (?) I’m not really sure why I was compelled to achieve this state. Probably to escape the lack of control I felt in my life, or deeply buried unhappiness and disappointment. To be more in touch with my body.

    After doing it I guess I felt a bit lighter or something. Probably have less anxiety after but it’s not something I really noticed that much. I don’t think I ever really notice anxiety that much :s It comes over me unexpectedly or it’s there in the background. But I think what might happen with picking, is you end up with dysregulated anxiety levels, slightly up and down all the time.

    @thistle I’m e9 btw (946)
    Last edited by Bethany; 04-02-2021 at 04:05 PM.
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    I have mild trichotillomania and an obsession with my hair too, I think it's a coping mechanism when having anxiety. I do get some kind of relief from tearing/fidgeting/scratching when I'm tense and anxious. I think it's similar to addictive behaviours like compulsive drinking, eating, smoking, masturbating and so on. For some people it goes way into OCD territory though.
    I rarely feel alone. I rarely talk to anyone, yet in my head i have the most amazing, the most fantastic discussions with the people in my life. In real life, what most people talk about is several orders of magnitude lesser than their inner experiences. Most people never reveal the singularity of their subjective experience.
    Maybe I should learn to explore other people's consciousness. Maybe I should aim for a real space between me and others. Instead of cultivating monologues and fantasies. It's hard, but the alternative to this seems to be madness. ~ lkdhf qkb

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