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Thread: Dietary Supplements (for optimal health)

  1. #81
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    Shivappa, N., Steck, S.E., Hurley, T.G., Hussey, J.R. and Hébert, J.R., 2014. Designing and developing a literature-derived, population-based dietary inflammatory index. Public health nutrition, 17(8), pp.1689-1696. (direct link to pdf file)
    https://doi.org/10.1017/S1368980013002115

    Abstract
    Objective

    To design and develop a literature-derived, population-based dietary inflammatory index (DII) to compare diverse populations on the inflammatory potential of their diets.
    Design

    Peer-reviewed primary research articles published through December 2010 on the effect of diet on inflammation were screened for possible inclusion in the DII scoring algorithm. Qualifying articles were scored according to whether each dietary parameter increased (+1), decreased (−1) or had no (0) effect on six inflammatory biomarkers: IL-1β, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, TNF-α and C-reactive protein.
    Setting

    The Dietary Inflammatory Index Development Study was conducted in the Cancer Prevention and Control Program of the University of South Carolina in Columbia, SC, USA from 2011 to 2012.
    Results

    A total of ≈6500 articles published through December 2010 on the effect of dietary parameters on the six inflammatory markers were screened for inclusion in the DII scoring algorithm. Eleven food consumption data sets from countries around the world were identified that allowed individuals’ intakes to be expressed relative to the range of intakes of the forty-five food parameters observed across these diverse populations. Qualifying articles (n 1943) were read and scored based on the forty-five pro- and anti-inflammatory food parameters identified in the search. When fit to this composite global database, the DII score of the maximally pro-inflammatory diet was +7·98, the maximally anti-inflammatory DII score was −8·87 and the median was +0·23.
    Conclusions

    The DII reflects both a robust literature base and standardization of individual intakes to global referent values. The success of this first-of-a-kind attempt at relating intakes of inflammation-modulating foods relative to global norms sets the stage for use of the DII in a wide variety of epidemiological and clinical studies.

    Keywords
    Nutrition assessment
    Inflammation
    Reference values
    Methodological research and developmen

  2. #82
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    Sharma, A., Saha, B.K., Kumar, R. and Varadwaj, P.K., 2021. OlfactionBase: a repository to explore odors, odorants, olfactory receptors and odorant–receptor interactions. Nucleic Acids Research.
    https://doi.org/10.1093/nar/gkab763

    Abstract

    Olfaction is a multi-stage process that initiates with the odorants entering the nose and terminates with the brain recognizing the odor associated with the odorant. In a very intricate way, the process incorporates various components functioning together and in synchronization. OlfactionBase is a free, open-access web server that aims to bring together knowledge about many aspects of the olfaction mechanism in one place. OlfactionBase contains detailed information of components like odors, odorants, and odorless compounds with physicochemical and ADMET properties, olfactory receptors (ORs), odorant- and pheromone binding proteins, OR-odorant interactions in Human and Mus musculus. The dynamic, user-friendly interface of the resource facilitates exploration of different entities: finding chemical compounds having desired odor, finding odorants associated with OR, associating chemical features with odor and OR, finding sequence information of ORs and related proteins. Finally, the data in OlfactionBase on odors, odorants, olfactory receptors, human and mouse OR-odorant pairs, and other associated proteins could aid in the inference and improved understanding of odor perception, which might provide new insights into the mechanism underlying olfaction. The OlfactionBase is available at https://bioserver.iiita.ac.in/olfactionbase/
    https://olfab.iiita.ac.in/olfactionbase/olfaction-wheel

  3. #83
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    Patan, M.J., Kennedy, D.O., Husberg, C., Hustvedt, S.O., Calder, P.C., Khan, J., Forster, J. and Jackson, P.A., 2021. Supplementation with oil rich in eicosapentaenoic acid, but not in docosahexaenoic acid, improves global cognitive function in healthy, young adults: results from randomized controlled trials. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.
    https://doi.org/10.1093/ajcn/nqab174

    ABSTRACT

    Background

    Evidence regarding the effects of the omega-3 (ɷ-3) PUFAs (n–3 PUFAs) DHA and EPA on cognition is lacking.
    Objectives

    We investigated whether supplementation with oils rich in EPA or DHA improves cognition, prefrontal cortex (PFC) hemoglobin (Hb) oxygenation, and memory consolidation.
    Methods

    Healthy adults (n = 310; age range: 25–49 y) completed a 26-wk randomized controlled trial in which they consumed either 900 mg DHA/d and 270 mg EPA/d (DHA-rich oil), 360 mg DHA/d and 900 mg EPA/d (EPA-rich oil), or 3000 mg/d refined olive oil (placebo). Cognitive performance and memory consolidation were assessed via computerized cognitive test battery. PFC Hb oxygenation was measured using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS).
    Results

    Both global accuracy and speed improved with EPA-rich oil compared with placebo and DHA-rich oil [EPA vs. placebo accuracy: estimated marginal mean (EMM) = 0.17 (95% CI: 0.09, 0.24) vs. EMM = 0.03 (95% CI = −0.04, 0.11); P = 0.044; EPA vs. placebo speed: EMM = −0.15 (95% CI: −0.22, −0.07) vs. EMM = 0.03 (95% CI: −0.05, 0.10); P = 0.003]. Accuracy of memory was improved with EPA compared with DHA [EMM = 0.66 (95% CI: 0.26, 1.06) vs. EMM = −0.08 (95% CI: −0.49, 0.33); P = 0.034]. Both EPA- and DHA-rich oils showed trends towards reduced PFC oxygenated Hb (oxy-Hb) compared with placebo [placebo: EMM = 27.36 µM (95% CI: 25.73, 28.98); DHA: EMM = 24.62 µM (95% CI: 22.75, 26.48); P = 0.060; EPA: EMM = 24.97 µM (95% CI: 23.35, 26.59); P = 0.082].
    Conclusions

    EPA supplementation improved global cognitive function and was superior to the oil enriched with DHA. Interpreted within a neural efficiency framework, reduced PFC oxygenated Hb suggests that n–3 PUFAs may be associated with increased efficiency.

    These trials were registered in the clinical trials registry (https://clinicaltrials.gov/) as NCT03158545, NCT03592251, NCT02763514.
    eicosapentaenoic acid, docosahexaenoic acid, n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, self-micro-emulsifying, cognition, memory
    Topic:

    alveolar ventilation function omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid cognition docosahexaenoic acids mental processes oils spectroscopy, near-infrared memory cell respiration cognitive ability young adult memory consolidation

    Issue Section:
    Dietary supplements

  4. #84
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    Kennedy, E.T., Buttriss, J.L., Bureau‐Franz, I., Klassen Wígger, P. and Drewnowski, A., 2021. Future of food: Innovating towards sustainable healthy diets. Nutrition Bulletin, 46(3), pp.260-263.

    INTRODUCTION

    The United Nations (UN) has set out Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to alleviate hunger and poverty and to ensure health and wellbeing for all in a more resilient and equitable food system. The constraints and challenges are known, and all stakeholders were asked by the UN to identify and implement ‘game changing ideas’ to help achieve the SDGs. We need actions geared towards delivery of healthy, affordable, sustainable and culturally acceptable diets. New measures and metrics are being applied to industry portfolios and to local and regional diets to report on progress and inform actions. Innovation is one of the key enablers.

  5. #85
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    Steenson, S. and Buttriss, J.L., 2021. Healthier and more sustainable diets: What changes are needed in high‐income countries?. Nutrition Bulletin, 46(3), pp.279-309.

    Abstract

    Debate persists around the food production and dietary changes needed to improve sustainability of our global food system. We reviewed 29 studies in high-income countries that used various methodologies to define a healthier, more sustainable diet. Diets aligned with dietary guidelines, containing less meat and higher amounts of plant-derived foods (vegetables, pulses [beans/lentils], fruit, wholegrains, nuts, seeds) would likely offer environmental benefits (~20–50% lower greenhouse gas emissions [GHGE] and land use) and improve population health, although may not reduce water footprint. Changes in consumption of milk products and eggs were inconsistent in optimisation studies, perhaps reflecting trade-offs between their nutrient contribution and environmental impact. Foods high in fat, salt and/or sugar, and beverages (e.g. tea, coffee and fruit juices) contributed substantially to environmental footprints in some studies. Vegetarian and vegan diets may deliver larger environmental benefits, but are unlikely to be widely adopted, and may reduce intakes and/or bioavailability of some essential nutrients (e.g. iron, zinc, iodine and B12). We recommend adherence to existing government dietary guidelines as a more realistic goal to improve environmental (e.g. 30% lower GHGE in the UK) and health impacts of diets, recognising that adherence is currently relatively poor. Wider considerations include: context-specific nutritional, health, cost and cultural needs; need for public engagement to understand barriers/motivators; better understanding of the wider implications and trade-offs linked to dietary and food system changes and how these can be managed, so that benefits in high-income countries do not come at the expense of greater ‘outsourced’ environmental impacts in other regions.

  6. #86
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    Starck, C.S., Blumfield, M., Keighley, T., Marshall, S., Petocz, P., Inan-Eroglu, E., Abbott, K., Cassettari, T., Ali, A., Wham, C. and Kruger, R., 2021. Nutrient dense, low-cost foods can improve the affordability and quality of the new zealand diet—a substitution modeling study. International journal of environmental research and public health, 18(15), p.7950.
    https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18157950

    Abstract

    The high prevalence of non-communicable disease in New Zealand (NZ) is driven in part by unhealthy diet selections, with food costs contributing to an increased risk for vulnerable population groups. This study aimed to: (i) identify the nutrient density-to-cost ratio of NZ foods; (ii) model the impact of substituting foods with a lower nutrient density-to-cost ratio with those with a higher nutrient density-to-cost ratio on diet quality and affordability in representative NZ population samples for low and medium socioeconomic status (SES) households by ethnicity; and (iii) evaluate food processing level. Foods were categorized, coded for processing level and discretionary status, analyzed for nutrient density and cost, and ranked by nutrient density-to-cost ratio. The top quartile of nutrient dense, low-cost foods were 56% unprocessed (vegetables, fruit, porridge, pasta, rice, nuts/seeds), 31% ultra-processed (vegetable dishes, fortified bread, breakfast cereals unfortified <15 g sugars/100 g and fortified 15–30 g sugars/100 g), 6% processed (fruit juice), and 6% culinary processed (oils). Using substitution modeling, diet quality improved by 59% and 71% for adults and children, respectively, and affordability increased by 20–24%, depending on ethnicity and SES. The NZ diet can be made healthier and more affordable when nutritious, low-cost foods are selected. Processing levels in the healthier, modeled diet suggest that some non-discretionary ultra-processed foods may provide a valuable source of low-cost nutrition for food insecure populations.

    Keywords: diet; cost and cost analysis; food security; food quality; socioeconomic factors; ethnic groups; nutrients; economic models

  7. #87
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    Colombo, M., Dolezalova, N., Despotovic, A., Reed, A.B., Morelli, D., Aral, M. and Plans, D., 2021. Development of a digitally-obtainable 10-year all-cause mortality risk score based on data from 497,712 UK Biobank participants. medRxiv. (direct link to pdf file)
    https://doi.org/10.1101/2021.06.23.21259387

    Lastly, regular glucosamine use was identified as protective in our model. Often used for treatment of joint pain, glucosamine’s beneficial effect on ACM has been established in literature by reducing one’s risk of developing several age-related diseases.
    According to this paper, regularly taking glucosamine significantly reduces individuals' "10-year all-cause mortality risk score".

    I intend to take 1.5g of glucosamine sulfate a day as a result. Supposedly (according to examine.com) consuming it with food divided into 3 doses is best, but I'd be unlikely to be willing to do anything other than 1 dose a day.

    Other papers worry about confusing cause and effect etc. (i.e. whether those who take it have lower all-cause mortality because they engage in healthier behaviours distinct from taking it). However, it has been shown to increase life expectancy in mice and worms so I'm persuaded it could be advantageous.

  8. #88
    Haikus
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    Supplements I take:

    Vit B6, B12, flushing Niacin
    Vit C, crave it especially in the summer heat and late winter.
    Vit D 8000 IU for years
    Vit E
    Zinc as needed. Immune system improvement and anti-inflammator
    Sometimes magnesium byglysinate. as needed
    GABBA, or gamma aminobutric acid, precursor of gluthoime, a Nerotransmiiter, nervous system calming, to sleep. Clinically proven.
    Melatonin, rarely to sleep
    Protein - high quality isolate
    NAC n-acetyl-cyteisine, clinically proven antioxidant for heart, kidneys, most especially lungs. Recently banned in the USA, probably because it works and doesn't make the big pharma $$$ honk honk.
    Creatine chlorhydrate, for athletic performance and cardiovascular endurance, clinically proven. I take the hydrate version over the monohydrate as it works better and is more easily absorbed. Plus it doesn't taste rank like mono does. It's the more supreme product. To bad you can't find it right now in Canada thanks to supply chain issues in China, nice going China you suck. Maybe you shouldn't have been playing with dangerous pathogens in incompetent laboratories.

    Drostanalone propionate, definition, hardening, drying, and wellbeing.
    Testosterone cypionate, size, strength, wellbeing, also cured peripheral nerve damage in my hands from chainsaw vibrations over the years, amoung many benfits
    Trenbolone enanthate, size and strength and aesthetic.
    Mesterolone, SHGB promotor and physical and emotional well-being and libido.
    Cabergoline, dopamine antagonist, prolactin inhibitor and libido enhancer
    Exemastane, suicidal aromatize inhibitor for estrogen control.

    There are two schools of thought on the usefulness of vitamins and minerals. I think anything the body is absorbing through the digestive track does play a role in function and metabolism. Many products cannot be absorbed and are exreted through the urinary system. Everything costs $$ and why waste it on BS?

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