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Thread: Describe your Learning Style(s)

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    Default Describe your Learning Style(s)

    I have two different approaches (really four): two for scientific material and two for non-technical material:

    For math/science:

    When I'm reading something with logic, I aim to fully understand the material, leaving nothing to the imagination. For instance, if I am given something like computer code, I analyze every step of the code, like it's a big jigsaw puzzle. In the process, I 'put the 'pieces together' visually in my mind, until I get a complete picture of how it works. I insist on getting every step right - at no time in the process do I allow myself to: take what is written at face value without fully comprehending it, skip steps, skip definitions, skim the material, or not read information in parentheses. In other words, every step of the process must be analyzed or I go back to the beginning of the material to understand it.

    When I'm solving a problem, I never break the rules, but I will use anything available to me to solve the problem. If I'm allowed to use the Internet, that will be the first place I look. If library books are allowed, I will do a thorough search through the library catalogue to find the correct information. As long as it is within the rules and parameters of the problem, I wouldn't mind if a solution were to simply 'materialize' on the blackboard.

    This has allowed me to become a deep learner and a good problem solver.

    For non-technical material:

    Now, reading a non-technical article is the exact opposite of something technical: at one time, I would try and read every word of a difficult (say) philosophy article, but, when I got to the end, I would find that I didn't have any concept of what I had just read, so I decided to take the opposite approach; I now read just to get the 'gist' of the article, paper, etc. It is not important that I get every word, but it is important that I don't just skim the material either. I try to read every complete paragraph, and if there is (e.g.) just one point or one word I don't get, then that is suffficient to understand the material as a whole. If, on the other hand, there are big passages of the material I do not understand, I either dump it entirely, or go back and reread the material from the beginning; the point is to just get the main idea of what the material is about without getting stuck on details that are entirely unimportant.

    Now, in writing something non-technical, I use the opposite approach again; it is now important that every sentence, and even every word be communicated properly. I also believe that one should make their writing as understandable as possible, and therefore appeal to the widest audience. I therefore try to write with absolute clarity. For this reason, I don't mind editing my writing again and again. I do it this way, because I noticed that taking care of the finer details of my writing in school could make the difference even between a 'B' and an 'A.' Therefore, I have developed the mentality that things should be 'dumbed down like crazy' to make them accessible and that 'every detail counts.'

    This has allowed me to be decent at understanding the written word, and a good communicator.

    Now, how do you learn?
    Last edited by jason_m; 06-06-2019 at 06:13 PM.

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    Hmm...
    In a school/class setting, I take notes. If that's not enough, I just sit and think about what I've been taught or do/invent problems to solve on it and that usually does the job.

    That does the job because my natural tendency to information since I was a little kid is to tend to ask and answer a lot of questions about the subject until I'm satisfied or can articulate why I disagree with certain things in it.

    All of the visual, auditory, etc. pales in comparison to what spending time with the problem does for me. Just memorizing without understanding it is important, though.

    In an autodidactic setting, I just think about it and do/invent problems. So basically the same thing.

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    I like formulas, graphs, figures and charts. Those four really stimulates imagination.


    Actual solving usually is combination of several processes.


    I do not read others computer code. I code my own (maybe by borrowing and combining) if it is not clear.
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    i like listening to clear, easy to follow instructions ((:

    also, when i learn something, i ask why questions until i cant ask it anymore
    this sometimes results in me learning ab the history behind a lot of things (which is cool!)

    i like being able to understand how everything of whatever im learning connects together

    (and for more physical things i thrive on really specific instructions-- which reminds me, my last bachata class was a mess hahaha)
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    1. I like it when people don't make any assumptions and are empathetic and intelligent about their lessons, and not just stating stupid rules about how things are without saying why. I feel so oblivious as to why I shouldn't put a diesel-fueled spoon into the center of an alligator's stomach, because I don't listen all that much. So please don't assume I know what a diesel-fueled spoon is or how to power one, let alone know the ethical or safety reasons behind why I shouldn't put one in the stomach of an alligator.
    2. When I said I don't listen all that much, I actually mean it. My ears have very low priority in my brains CPU and most auditory information goes straight to my unconscious- if that. I much prefer reading things over and imagining it in my head, than listening to people go on and on and on and nothing coming together because my sense of verbal logic/intelligence is blunted.
    3. Honestly, there's no unique cool way of learning for me... it's just repetition, repetition, repetition. Along with visualization and imagination. It's difficult to learn the word "tuesday" in a language when you don't give a fuck about days of the week and lose track of time like me. But if you use empathy and imagination to see how someone else would use the word and give it meaning, then it becomes easier.

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    I learn through action and youtube videos.

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    Reading, clearing words with a dictionary, and then doing/applying if possible. Listening helps only if it's along with reading or doing but by itself not useful. Then repeating this several times until I get it. I don't have a very sophisticated learning method and notes taken usually turn into a incoherent mess that will confuse me more than help due to me usually not having a clear understanding of that which I take notes of. So yeah, could deeeeefinitely improve on my study skills.

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    Brute force. That's pretty much how I've learned it all. Keep trying again and again and again until you finally "get it" as it were. At least it's an honest way of learning things .

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    Quote Originally Posted by End View Post
    Brute force. That's pretty much how I've learned it all. Keep trying again and again and again until you finally "get it" as it were. At least it's an honest way of learning things .
    Most approaches probably use brute force in some way. Even my approach uses it; the only difference is that I use brute force, but I try to not learn anything by 'rote.' Really, as complicated as I made it sound, that is basically it...

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    Quote Originally Posted by jason_m View Post
    Most approaches probably use brute force in some way. Even my approach uses it; the only difference is that I use brute force, but I try to not learn anything by 'rote.' Really, as complicated as I made it sound, that is basically it...
    Thing is, some things can only be learned by rote. For example, music theory. If ye are not blessed with the gift of "Perfect Pitch" (and it is a thing you either have or don't I must emphasize) then your only other option is to get so damn good at rote "relative" pitch that people mistake you for having that aforementioned gift. To achieve "Perfect" relative pitch as it were. Indeed, ask most any musician. They'll flat out tell ya that some things just gotta be learned by rote. What's a "half-step" up or down from A flat sound like? What note is that? That note can also be said to be what? What is the "Circle of Fifths" and how can you just know what "Key Signature" a given song is using just by ear? I could go on but it is both a field I have but recently been researching and boy is it blowing my mind as I do. It's a whole other angle of reality you didn't even know was there, like when I discovered the "Hero's Journey" in regards to storytelling years ago.

    Pretty much all my favorite stories followed that structure, and as I learned more I got it on yet more fundamental levels. Truly, we humans are all the same, but in ways no SJW, Marxist, Materialist, Death Cult following hater of Christ could ever conceive of. I'm now discovering why I loved Heavy Metal, Gregorian Chants, and such as much as I do. There was a whole friggin' "science" to it that I never knew of until now. Proof once more that there is always, always​, more for us to learn .

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