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Thread: Trauma and effect on type - personal musings

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    the Lycanthrope Remiel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sbbds View Post
    It’s too bad you had to act like an insulting, neurotic little bitch to finally get your point across after all this time, after changing your stance multiple times too.

    I don’t think it’s bad or unnatural, up to a point mind you if it also comes with self-awareness. “Fake it till you make it” is a thing for a reason. However, it’s probably true that most people on the internet who are doing it in a way that stands out as unnatural are probably doing it unhealthily.
    I think it's funny that you're arriving at this point contradicting yourself and while not sharing my sentiment that such actions is pathetic but rather saying it's unhealthy. Also, I was not insulting until you were, takes two to tango. My stance never changed, but since this conversation is done through quotes, it will be clear to all who read it that you eventually did. This gives me great pleasure. Thank you.
    "The society that separates its scholars from its warriors will have its thinking done by cowards and its fighting by fools." ―Thucydides



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    f.k.a Oprah sbbds's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Remiel View Post
    I think it's funny that you're arriving at this point contradicting yourself and while not sharing my sentiment that such actions is pathetic but rather saying it's unhealthy. Also, I was not insulting until you were, takes two to tango. My stance never changed, but since this conversation is done through quotes, it will be clear to all who read it that you eventually did. This gives me great pleasure. Thank you.
    Nope. Read it again.

    Really no reason for you to have gotten all moody, negative and shitty towards me.

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    f.k.a Oprah sbbds's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Remiel View Post
    I cant give any useful input in regard to typology in a broader sense but for myself and in extension my type it has affected my emotional development.
    There has been instances where I go blank and 'see red' so to speak, I've been told that my pupils have expanded to the point of blotting out my irises.
    Nothing like that has happened recently but I can still feel it coming on if I am put in a situation where I am unable to defend myself the way I want when someone slights me.

    The most fascinating part of it though is how it has made it's mark on my sexual preferences, making me completely dominant and somewhat sadistic. (Don't confuse that what abuse though, which is something completely different.) From what I understand about the origin of fetishism it's often correlated with turning a need upside down.
    If you've been made to feel powerless, being powerful can become your fetish etc. A phenomenon like that will much likely integrate well with socionics.
    Quote Originally Posted by wonderland View Post
    I remember reading about the opposite, men who had power in work, family settings ftom a young age who go to dominatrix. Humans are fascinating.
    Quote Originally Posted by Remiel View Post
    That's not the opposite, it's the exact thing I said. They have power, they desire giving it and responsibility up by going to a dominatrix. Making them sexually submissive.
    Quote Originally Posted by Remiel View Post
    Seems pretty straight forward to me. I think you're twisting it around one too many times in your noggin. Anything can be angled if you have no interest in being right.
    Here again you’re the one misinterpreting someone from your own misunderstanding and being insulting towards them inordinately. They obviously meant that it was the opposite situation from YOURS, not from the concept you were trying to explain.

    Having experienced a shit past can be glorified by some people and they can wallow in it and in those behavioural patterns. I gently suggest you cut this one out now.

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    the Lycanthrope Remiel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sbbds View Post
    Here again you’re the one misinterpreting someone from your own misunderstanding and being insulting towards them inordinately. They obviously meant that it was the opposite situation from YOURS, not from the concept you were trying to explain.

    Having experienced a shit past can be glorified by some people and they can wallow in it and in those behavioural patterns. I gently suggest you cut this one out now.
    It's not my problem if someone is too slow on the uptake. How's your uncle these days niffer?
    "The society that separates its scholars from its warriors will have its thinking done by cowards and its fighting by fools." ―Thucydides



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    f.k.a Oprah sbbds's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Remiel View Post
    It's not my problem if someone is too slow on the uptake. How's your uncle these days niffer?
    It is if that person is you.

    What about my uncle? He’s fine. If you’re asking me a random question to try to get me to admit to being niffer, it’s also fine lol. Mods already know.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sbbds View Post
    It is if that person is you.
    Your frail ego is about as charmig as the rest of your cantankerous self as usual I see.
    "The society that separates its scholars from its warriors will have its thinking done by cowards and its fighting by fools." ―Thucydides



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    I happen to believe that "type" is something which is set very early, probably before birth. How one reacts to trauma is probably characteristic of ones' type and other characteristics, such as instincts, enneagram, level of healthiness, how much support a person can find to counteract trauma, etc.

    I have no doubt, though, that trauma affects a person's life.

    My two younger siblings and I were raised in a family where the LSE mother was a violent narcissist and the SLI father was absent and didn't defend us against her in the little amount of time he was around. This profoundly affected me and my sisters.

    I, an LIE and the oldest, to this day feel like a case of severely retarded development. I didn't have a GF until I was 25 and still feel like I missed the boat on most of life. My life didn't really start until I escaped my parent's house. However, my experiences may have affected how my LIE-ness manifests, because I find I am extremely protective of the weak, and cold and vengeful towards abusers, which is something that I don't particularly see in most other LIE's whom I know IRL. They seem to be content to reap society's rewards without considering how those rewards came about, or who might have been harmed in the process.

    My next younger sister, an LSE, married an IEI because she was comfortable with being hated and conflicted. They don't have any kids.

    My youngest sister, an LII, collapsed into herself, tried to drink herself to death, has had a few bad marriages, is now married to an LSE (same type as her abusive mother, so she's still trying to fix that relationship) and has a "no contact" rule with our parents. She, also, doesn't have any kids.

    Each of us reacted slightly differently to similar trauma, but I don't think it affected our types, per se.
    Last edited by Adam Strange; 12-02-2018 at 07:46 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Adam Strange View Post
    ........I find I am extremely protective of the weak and cold and vengeful towards abusers........
    People under stress often manifest dual-like personas and ESIs have been known to often behave like a self-righteous Jeanne d'Arcs. I would guess that you had been in dual mode a lot as a child - and now it's automatic.

    I've met some war vets who underwent such severe trauma that type was no longer distinguishable.

    a.k.a. I/O

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    I had the thought as a teen that if I had had an easier childhood, I would be one hell of an asshole.
    Funny how trauma seems, from just this thread, to sooth edges or sharpen them regarding what we start with.
    I read a lot about becoming tougher, the softening counterpart, I think, is less discussed... or at least not at long lenght. Hm...

    I like taoism and the idea of action through non-action @Aramas brough up. It's a thing I try to keep in mind actually. It feels like I am nothing when I manage to be that, it's at the same time scary and relieving.
    I sometimes get the impression that many spiritual stuff say the same thing but for different people. One just have to find which words resonate with themselves. Or make them, whatev.
    Like there is an "ultimate truth" but also not. Anyhoo.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Venus Rose View Post
    Yes, I addressed that here though...
    Sort of. The ego functions are generally used more than other functions, even when healthy. I'm not saying they're necessarily used more, just in a more unhealthy way. Trauma may manifest in other ways too, though. I've seen ESEs become more withdrawn which actually goes against their default behavior rather than accentuating it.

    The generalizations you make about the other blocks are more far-fetched - the idea of a "PoLR hit" is problematic in the first place IMO. If you gave some examples it would be clearer.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Adam Strange View Post
    I happen to believe that "type" is something which is set very early, probably before birth. How one reacts to trauma is probably characteristic of ones' type and other characteristics, such as instincts, enneagram, level of healthiness, how much support a person can find to counteract trauma, etc.

    I have no doubt, though, that trauma affects a person's life.

    My two younger siblings and I were raised in a family where the LSE mother was a violent narcissist and the SLI father was absent and didn't defend us against her in the little amount of time he was around. This profoundly affected me and my sisters.

    I, an LIE and the oldest, to this day feel like a case of severely retarded development. I didn't have a GF until I was 25 and still feel like I missed the boat on most of life. My life didn't really start until I escaped my parent's house. However, my experiences may have affected how my LIE-ness manifests, because I find I am extremely protective of the weak, and cold and vengeful towards abusers, which is something that I don't particularly see in most other LIE's whom I know IRL. They seem to be content to reap society's rewards without considering how those rewards came about, or who might have been harmed in the process.

    My next younger sister, an LSE, married an IEI because she was comfortable with being hated and conflicted. They don't have any kids.

    My youngest sister, an LII, collapsed into herself, tried to drink herself to death, has had a few bad marriages, is now married to an LSE (same type as her abusive mother, so she's still trying to fix that relationship) and has a "no contact" rule with our parents. She, also, doesn't have any kids.

    Each of us reacted slightly differently to similar trauma, but I don't think it affected our types, per se.
    It seems like a pattern develops eh? Your parents stole your life and you don't want to spend what's left of it on kids. It's a good way to not perpetuate trauma anyway. Can't repeat a cycle if you don't make one.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Venus Rose View Post
    Alright, so I thought I would make a post addressing some of the broad concerns that I observed in the replies.

    On trauma and difference in personality type.

    I do think that trauma affects each human being differently, based on their personality type. However, I purposely skipped over this, in the OP, because I felt that there is more than enough information out that on how stress and/or trauma will affect your type (MBTI, socionics, enneagram, etc.) specifically. And I also think it's extremely intuitive to figure out. I don't mean to say that this is not an important point! It's very important, but I wanted to focus on things that I, personally, haven't seen stated anywhere else. I am still pretty new to socionics, and if there is already information floating around about socionics as it pertains to trauma, I unfortunately haven't come across it yet.

    On developmental trauma.

    I take a slightly different view on developmental trauma. I don't believe there is such a thing as "not having a sense of self" due to a personality disorder, a developmental trauma, or anything else. I do think that a child has somewhat of an innate temperament, and that gets modified and adjusted according to environment. During psychological development, the child learns to connect with the caregiver - specially the primary caregiver - and feels connected and seen. You can sense this connection with children who haven't even learned to speak, but yet you are communicating with them. We carry this with us, for the rest of our lives, as non-verbal communication. I feel like it's possibly the most beautiful part about an exchange - the emotions are experienced, words are said without speaking, almost as if there is a palpable line connecting the two. A lot can be said in this way. It is very powerful.

    I stress this part about connection because I think those with developmental traumas have had this line of connection severed, or short-circuited. It is an extremely painful way to be, and it affects their sense of self. This is where I don't completely agree with personality disorders making it such that someone doesn't have a sense of self. Because the self is a potential, it is a seed - and you had that seed in you the moment you were born. No one can destroy it. But due to lack of attachment and communication (or what Psychology refers to as lack of reflective functioning or mentalization), that seed wasn't allowed to flourish. It feels like you do not exist in the eyes of others. And that is a very painful experience for the one going through it. But that inherent potential for a "self" is still there, even if you don't technically have a sense of it (self). Or, even when your sense of self feels chaotic and shifty.

    The attachment facilitates development of the theory of mind (also ref: mirror task). This is what creates a sense of self in the individual, and that self does not exist if it is not so in the eyes of others. Attachment is a crucial thing, and damage to it can greatly harm the individual. Also something slightly random, but this is the reason why identity is important to people. If you cannot respect their self-expression, their sense of self, it feels like they do not completely exist. Hence, I feel like, people get upset over that.

    Anyways, coming back to trauma and type - this type of trauma clearly affects type. There is no question about that. Not in the sense that it changes your type, per se, but that it affects your personality type nonetheless - perhaps in the expression of it.

    Trauma that does not occur during development, has a higher probability of being dealt with better, assuming adequate support and no other compounding factor(s).

    Developmental trauma may very well affect the individual for life.

    Also, perhaps slightly tangential, but everyone has all functions. In the case of something like trauma, the psyche feels like it disintegrates, and the individual is in survival mode. So, I am not sure there is any point in trying to differentiate between how an "Ni dom" may respond to trauma, or any other type. Though they will, obviously, have their own unique responses varying by type - eventually. But at the very focal point of the traumatic experience, I am not sure that even matters, since everything will feel like chaos and blur.

    On unfair treatment of certain personality types, based on status quo.

    From my own experience, I would say society doesn't care nor treat the vulnerable very well. This is compounded by cowardly behaviors by the "henchmen" if you will, of sociopaths. And sociopaths are, unfortunately, everywhere. And no one has the guts to put an end to cruelty happening right in front of their eyes, lest they become the victim themselves.

    So, I would say that not only do people, taken as a whole, not seem to care about those that healthy, and may be mistreated - they frequently overlook those that are vulnerable and/or being abused. There is the case of mob mentality as well.

    I would suggest that people who need help, find someone they feel safe with and makes them feel better.

    => I should also add, since this seems to be causing some confusion: My take on trauma, for this specific OP, was based on trauma due to abuse experienced through the vulnerable function. So everything else that I mentioned also came out of that central idea. I do not mean to suggest that all traumas are experienced the way I described them. However, I feel - I hope! - that there is quite a bit in there that many people will be able to relate to. I think my central theme(s) were: abuse of vulnerable aspects of the personality type, attempt at coping with that abuse, and the resultant fracture in personality. But I do think that what I described broadens beyond that as well.

    It's not possible to over-use the ego block.

    I don't really agree, but I don't have a lot to say on this, at the moment. I do understand what you are trying to say. It wouldn't make sense to over-use something that you are already expending maximum energy on. But what I was attempting to point out, was that people may go into over-drive on their primary functions (should also throw in inferior grip theory from MBTI, since it would probably be in conjunction with that) when they are under great stress. And in such a way that most others would find it extreme and repelling.

    An individual is more than their type.

    There is way too much that can be said about this. Esoteric systems like the enneagram, and probably several more, are founded on the idea that ultimately "who you are" is oneness. That is something interesting to ponder, but I am not going in that direction, for this post.

    Abuse through the suggestive function(s).

    Very interesting. This is not something I had thought about before, and would love to hear people expand more on that.
    Abuse through the suggestive function is the easiest. It's the function of which one has the least conscious knowledge, so it's like the backdoor into a person's psyche. Someone tends to accept whatever information comes in on that function without criticism. Once habits are made in that area, they are supposedly very difficult to break, and can take years to reprogram.

    If the programming is good, it becomes a spine that's very hard to break. Conversely, if it's filled with unhelpful suggestions and methods, it can be like the thing that always trips you up.

    It's a point of extreme sensitivity, in other words. People often get the PoLR and suggestive function's traits mixed up. The PoLR can be a painful area but only if people have received lots of criticism about it, or they ignore it without backup from the superid and it comes knocking unexpectedly one day. The suggestive function on the other hand is the softest and almost always present button in the core of a person's unconscious psyche.

    The DS is the function that you secretly want to succeed at the most but you don't tell anyone openly about it. It's the teddy bear at the bottom of your heart. If you're told that you fail at it, or that it's meaningless and not worth your time (or, worst of all, that it's evil), it hurts deeply. The DS is the source of a person's compassion. This is why conflict hurts so badly. Imagine someone telling you that the thing you love the most is worthless garbage.

    Tell an Fi dom that they're stupid or can't do anything right, or an Ne dom that they look fucked up, or a Ti dom that no one likes them, or an Ni dom that they seem pretty weak, etc.

    It's possible that duals are not aware of each other's weaknesses at first, and they accidentally hurt each other. They think to themselves, "Wow, I didn't expect that to hurt." That's because for the dual, the weakest function is the strongest. They have absolutely no issues there and don't expect anyone to be the same. People are afraid of duals when they've had negative experiences with the DS function.

    Sometimes the DS is so sensitive that even mentioning the topic is enough to cause extreme pain.

    Your dual and conflictor are the two types that have the best ability to either make you or break you.

    It's sometimes hard to tell the difference between the PoLR and DS. They are both not so good areas. The difference between them is something you can sense in practice by observing what someone will never be good at no matter how hard they try, versus something that is a very deeply hidden strength at a core of a person's psyche.

    For example, an Ni dominant type has very deeply hidden toughness of Se, while the Fi dominant types can have a shocking intellect, and the Ti dominant types can, on rare occasion, make Hitler's charisma look like child's play.

    People who are really really mean to people are often people who were denied help with the DS function or people who had the PoLR imposed on them, or both. People can get so fucked up that they deny aid with the DS or from the dual type. Look at Voldemort. He pushed Bellatrix away even though she was the only one who really wanted to help him completely (she was the only undying, perfectly loyal servant he had), and if he had taken her advice and let her kill Harry Potter, Dumbledore's plan would have failed and Voldemort would have won. He literally had to do absolutely nothing to win, but he fucked up.
    Last edited by Aramas; 12-03-2018 at 12:47 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Aramas View Post
    It seems like a pattern develops eh? Your parents stole your life and you don't want to spend what's left of it on kids. It's a good way to not perpetuate trauma anyway. Can't repeat a cycle if you don't make one.
    &Aramas, no, I don’t think that’s the reason why they didn’t have kids. They have both stated that they are afraid that they would screw up their kids as badly as they, themselves, were screwed up.
    Personally, I think that they’d both make better parents than our parents were, but it’s not my decision.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Adam Strange View Post
    I happen to believe that "type" is something which is set very early, probably before birth. How one reacts to trauma is probably characteristic of ones' type and other characteristics, such as instincts, enneagram, level of healthiness, how much support a person can find to counteract trauma, etc.

    I have no doubt, though, that trauma affects a person's life.

    My two younger siblings and I were raised in a family where the LSE mother was a violent narcissist and the SLI father was absent and didn't defend us against her in the little amount of time he was around. This profoundly affected me and my sisters.

    I, an LIE and the oldest, to this day feel like a case of severely retarded development. I didn't have a GF until I was 25 and still feel like I missed the boat on most of life. My life didn't really start until I escaped my parent's house. However, my experiences may have affected how my LIE-ness manifests, because I find I am extremely protective of the weak, and cold and vengeful towards abusers, which is something that I don't particularly see in most other LIE's whom I know IRL. They seem to be content to reap society's rewards without considering how those rewards came about, or who might have been harmed in the process.

    My next younger sister, an LSE, married an IEI because she was comfortable with being hated and conflicted. They don't have any kids.

    My youngest sister, an LII, collapsed into herself, tried to drink herself to death, has had a few bad marriages, is now married to an LSE (same type as her abusive mother, so she's still trying to fix that relationship) and has a "no contact" rule with our parents. She, also, doesn't have any kids.

    Each of us reacted slightly differently to similar trauma, but I don't think it affected our types, per se.
    I also have become extremely protective of the weak and have a killer instinct toward abusers. I’ve even put myself in danger a few times in the city to protect people. I think it’s a combination of being a parent, which made me more likely to catalog every threat in my environment and analyse who is vulnerable to the threats, and having been through situations where I experienced other people with their heads wrapped in bystander-effect gauze, and just simple hypervigilance.

    I wasn’t always like this because when I was younger I probably didn’t think I had the power to intervene. The change came in adulthood, not even young adulthood, and it feels like a set of strategies and preferences appended to me and not arising directly from my core personality.

    I think also the influence of an Se dominant 8 taught me some of these behaviors.

    So where @Rebelondeck is attributing this sort of thing to ESIness, which I can understand the justification for, ime this is a reaction to my past and a personal choice I made about how I want to live my life—I will come to the aid of someone in trouble if I can, systemically I’m ready to mobilize, and my safety is not necessarily more important to me than someone else’s.

    I’ve seen too much to make a different choice.
    LSI: “I still can’t figure out Pinterest.”

    Me: “It’s just, like, idea boards.”

    LSI: “I don’t have ideas.”

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    Quote Originally Posted by Aramas View Post
    Abuse through the suggestive function is the easiest.
    Role and suggestive have the similar strenght and are the weakest by Jung (though he did not described "role" one). The most problematic types are superego - they have the abbility to produce neurotic psyche issues the most. While duals have _the least_ possibility for this.
    Hypotethically, the difference mb in acceptance of duals influence, while superego create inner conflicts which lead to neurotic symptoms. People resist to superego influence as it was given in "wrong" way, instead of processing it; this influence may go on deeper levels and stay there unresolved by conscious normal processes, the inner conflict stays and produces symptoms. While duals influence you absorb, it does not create stable inner conflict in unconsciousness, it does not freezes somewhere as has no resistance.

    Mb superegos may create psyche issues through your suggestive (in conjuction with your role) function the most. While duals should to have the least chance for this.
    You may dislike something did at your suggestive region by your dual, but it does not create traumas or psyche issues, - it's processed as should.

    > It's possible that duals are not aware of each other's weaknesses at first, and they accidentally hurt each other.

    The reason of problems is mostly in own weak regions.
    Duals may understand the weaknesses of each other. But it needs time to adopt the behavior. T types generally see good logical problems of F types. But to deal with people needs taking into account also emotions, what is weak side of T types. They need to study how to express own opinions and to behave to hurt the feelings of their dual lesser. While F types are motivated by emotions to think many things, while they'd need to think better, to become lesser asured where they have the lack of info, to accept easier another sometimes lesser pleasant views - so to lesser provoke the critique and disagreements.
    Duals adopt to each other easier than other types.

    > People are afraid of duals when they've had negative experiences with the DS function.

    People have irrational trust to duals the most, and should to keep it despite their experience with some examples. The same is with all IR - they are stable, may be changed only the perception of concrete people.

    What you say is baseless heresy, controversing to the practice. You assign to duals the effects of superegos.
    While what Venus Rose does in this theme is the rationalization of the wrong opinion about own type.
    Last edited by Sol; 12-03-2018 at 01:41 PM.
    Types examples: video bloggers, actors

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    My response to trauma as an adolescent was emotional instability/bpd-like behavior, nihilistic risk-seeking, hypersexuality. Maybe some of it was just teenbrain - some of it leaked into adulthood but was tempered by my ability to self regulate and gauge consequences. I guess this is somewhat consistent with gamma sf ego functions if that's what you type me but they're such common symptoms that i'm skeptical that it's related to type.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Venus Rose View Post
    The ego block will likely be overused in an unhealthy way, where the individual over-does what he naturally does well, causing many around him to be repelled as they see him as rather extreme in his behavior. This may be due to anxiety, paranoia, and general sense of not being able to feel safe. He will get the feeling that his ego functions are not enough, and he needs more in order to go back to feeling safe and healthy again. There will be denial that serious trauma often causes long-term consequences, and the individual may initially deny the seriousness of his psychological injury and assume that he is going to quickly be able to go back to the way he used to be.
    Quote Originally Posted by Venus Rose View Post
    All of this will cause added stress, including headaches, nightmares, feelings of anguish and being unable to deal with what one is going through. The best way to break out of that cycle is to focus once again on what you are strong at (ego) and what helps you and soothes you most (super-id).
    This seems like a contradiction.

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    I don't feel like I have that much of anything constructive to say about this that hasn't already been said. But since other people have shared their own responses, I figure I might as well share mine.

    There have been a few things in my life that could be considered traumatic, and my way of dealing with them was not dealing with them. I'm even hesitant to call them traumatic as I always think of how it could be worse. I could probably have something horrible happen to me and tell no one ever and deny that I was traumatized by it. I go with complete avoidance, repression, withdrawal, denial. I have actually experienced very strong & deep denial before to the point it scared me when I 'woke' up. I felt like Leo at the the end of Shutter Island. It really made me distrustful of my own perception. I never acted out as a child or got in trouble at school. I actually strived to never get in trouble, was happy with fading into the woodwork, and not make any waves at all. But I was a fearful, quiet, and anxious child. Things that deeply disturbed me I would rather not address and pretend they didn't happen. They tend to rear their ugly head by appearing as constant themes in my nightmares and me being very weird and avoidant about certain subject matters. I feel like it might have developed my enneagram type and stacking more than anything..

    I ran my raw genetic data through a site that told you if you are more prone to developing diseases or psychological disorders. Something that stuck out to me is that I'm evidently 99% more susceptible to developing PTSD than the general population. TBH I wasn't surprised by that. How accurate it is, I'm not sure. But I suppose some people are just more genetically susceptible and they have identified the gene they believe is responsible. I don't think I have PTSD, but I just thought it was interesting...
    Last edited by aster; 12-03-2018 at 03:14 PM.
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    “Sweatpants are a sign of defeat. You lost control of your life so you bought some sweatpants.”
    ~Karl

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    Quote Originally Posted by golden View Post
    ......So where @Rebelondeck is attributing this sort of thing to ESIness,........
    While under stress, for which one is not coping well, behaviour can be colored by dual-like processing. I certainly didn't mean to imply that caring for others was limited to ESIness; it's more about the way one goes about caring. One can achieve the same result from various processing configurations. For example, EIEs have been known to act rashly (impatiently?) and put themselves in danger whereas LSIs will often think before heading into the breach but this doesn't imply they won't go; when EIEs are in real impending danger, they've been known to get pensive and actually grow quiet......

    a.k.a. I/O

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    My main trauma is personnality typing

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    Quote Originally Posted by ashlesha View Post
    My response to trauma as an adolescent was emotional instability/bpd-like behavior, nihilistic risk-seeking, hypersexuality
    behavior = personal traits + environment
    besides Jung's type and age there are different traits

    hypersexuality is common for manic phases
    nihilistic risk-seeking may correlate with bipolar disorder too

    bipolar disorders (and mb border states) have genetic predisposition

    > Maybe some of it was just teenbrain

    in teenager times psyche is lesser stable and some behavior anomalies appear easier
    also kids have no other people to care about and hence feel lesser need to behave reasonably. they tend to experiment for a fun
    also with aging people study to control the behavior and biology some improves to make it easier

    The approach "something made my mood bad and that somehow has changed radically my behavior" is doubtful and too partial. Base Fi types, like possibly miss Rose has, tend to see and explain the world through their personal feelings.
    For example, she tried to asure me that her clear Se valued art taste is the result of external influence, but not from her types predispositions. Nice try. Fresh approach in heresies.

    Quote Originally Posted by aster View Post
    I'm evidently 99% more susceptible to developing PTSD than the general population. TBH I wasn't surprised by that. How accurate it is, I'm not sure. But I suppose some people are just more genetically susceptible and they have identified the gene they believe is responsible. I don't think I have PTSD, but I just thought it was interesting
    E9 keep much inside and this may predispose to PTSD. to get it you'd need to get a strong shock. with safe life this will not happen even you have the predisposition
    Types examples: video bloggers, actors

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