View Poll Results: Do you believe in God?

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  • Yes

    22 39.29%
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    18 32.14%
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    8 14.29%
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Thread: Do you believe in God?

  1. #441

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    This question has never been relevant.

  2. #442

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    Yup! It's the most important relationship in my life.

  3. #443

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    I don't "believe" in god, I think that its existance is the most logical option.

  4. #444
    Muddy's Avatar
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    I subscribe to biocentrism, which is the idea that death is simply impossible to experience and therefore we must always be alive and conscious in some form, and that the laws of physics are shaped around supporting the existence of life/consciousness.

  5. #445
    Not Sh!t coeruleum's Avatar
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    I believe in a pantheist God. Everything is logically a better god than nothing (atheism.) There are also plenty of things now that could blow the gods of various prehistoric religions to smithereens. The God of Abraham couldn't take down iron chariots, and whatever that exactly referred to, it makes him sound like some sort of fairy being scared off by iron who we really would've accidentally killed like at the beginning of Also Sprach Zarathustra as soon as we had cannons, never mind tanks and bombs. God is real and gods are real by various definitions of gods, but no cosmic parent is going to save you. It's better just not to navel-gaze.

  6. #446
    Not Sh!t coeruleum's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Muddy View Post
    I subscribe to biocentrism, which is the idea that death is simply impossible to experience and therefore we must always be alive and conscious in some form, and that the laws of physics are shaped around supporting the existence of life/consciousness.
    There were plenty of times in the past I wasn't conscious (like before birth) and there will be plenty of times in the future I won't be (sleep.) I don't intend to be eternally dead ever and I hope to avoid ever being dead at all (who knows exactly what'll happen?) but biocentrism seems pretty self-evidently false.

  7. #447
    Not Sh!t coeruleum's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mclane View Post
    I don't "believe" in god, I think that its existance is the most logical option.
    That's still a form of belief (rationalism,) just not the kind organized religion pushes, which is an important distinction when actually talking about god so that's good to bring up. What kind of god do you believe in, deist, Spinoza's god, some sort of Brahman type god or Gaia entity who works miracles?

  8. #448
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    I believe in reincarnation, and some sort of unnamed spiritual energy that we’re all floating in that’s shaping us.

    I have prayed to a god when I was young in dire times (or at least, dire times for an 8 year old ) but I never got any answers. But I only did it because I felt like I was supposed to because of society. When I was a kid, I used to let others opinions shape me a lot so when I saw religious people in the world I kind of thought, hey am I supposed to do this too? But when I tried it I just felt empty and almost stupid lol. Before I let anyone’s beliefs touch me I was basically a natural atheist. I come from a mixed religion household and I was never taught to believe one thing or the other, or really anything. They just let me think whatever, which is one of the very few little things I will thank my parents for. I have never been to a church in my life either. I’ve joked that I’d probably start burning if I tried to enter one and they’d reject me. But even when I “tried” to pray as a kid, I wasn’t a believer. I was just an agnostic kid.

    I believe more in the power of nature which can seem unexplainable, but science can explain whatever questions we pose.
    And I'm what you desire, like a siren in the night



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  9. #449
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    The two main types of gods humans follow are 1) discrete entities of "magical" power such as in polytheist traditions that may or may not embody forces of nature; and 2) a "thing" so massive and all-encompassing in reach, that it can be better explained as an illusion of our anthropic frame of perception, rather than the apparent object we make it out to be.
    The former is at least falsifiable, even if it's true that we've never encountered it. The latter type is more in line with monotheism.

    Theological explanations for the apparently contradictory or aloof actions of a monotheistic god often cite their utter lack of obligation to the creations they love, despite their seemingly random willingness to selectively help certain loyal followers in times of need. This is a sharp departure from the initiative motive many people have for following a monotheistic faith, being the promise of at least some sort of assistance in either this life or the next in exchange for loyalty to the deity; once this aspect of equivalent exchange goes away, you're left with nothing but "following god for God's sake," which becomes silly descriptive nihilism. Those who were bound to worship God for its own sake will end up worshiping, and reaping the due reward, no matter what, and those who were bound not to, never can and never will with the same righteous motivations, and will never be duly rewarded no matter how hard they fake it.
    Not only does this destroy the monotheistic carrot of God's unwavering love or eternal afterlife, it also reduces your theology back to the same hard determinism you'd get from Reductive Physicalism, and all the theological framework is now fluff that serves no apparent purpose.


    To the apparent statistical improbability of something so final and infinite having such an overstated interest in something as minuscule in its creations of Humanity - or alternately, the unlikelihood of the grand creator operating on assumptions that otherwise seem uniquely anthropic - there's the Iranaean Theodicy, the idea that a creator's intent for creating us in an imperfect world is for it to serve as a testing ground for our virtue. One could take this a step further and infer that any god that needs a testing ground to complete his own creations is not "omnipotent" in the sense of having all possible power, but may be "quasi-omnipotent" by simply being the most powerful entity in existence. This description is closer to the first type of god, the "powerful spirit," rather than a god of the infinite.
    What's peculiar about this perspective is that when moral determinism is applied, the choices a person makes given the circumstances of making them hinge on traits of moral virtue innate to themselves; we all know we have an easier time making "better" choices when our strength is up and our wits about us, so the formula for one's moral merit is some function of their mental fortitude - their strength. Their power to resist temptation.
    More powerful beings are more moral, and will be judged more favorably in the end. Might makes Right - therefore, the selection of the Righteous from Unrighteous is the selection of the Strong from the weak.
    But we already have this in the absence of monotheistic god, in the form of Natural Selection. God's behavior matches the uncaring tides of Nature, making him redundant.

    The questions raised by theology are grimly answered by an entirely different framework. The only thing theology leaves us with is the useless artifact of anthropomorphizing nature, in the form of "god."

    And that is its gravest mistake. Projecting a human face into the night sky that tried to smother us in our crib across the strange aeons when we were coming of age.

    "Love" god? How many of you were born mighty? Our angry mother tried to abort us. Several times. And fools still aspire to live "in accordance with her" instead of finally giving her the good arm-twisting she deserves.
    If God exists, you don't want to meet him. We are no children of his. If he were in you, you'd be walking to him already, because nothing would be more desirable. And if you don't have him in you now, you never did and never will.
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    Shut the fuck up, dumbass.


  10. #450
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    My family drilled the teachings of Christianity into me for much of my life, and so, as was almost inevitable, I spent a number of years practicing that religion. I stopped practicing it at the age of about 14, and, at that point, became an atheist. My atheism took shape as a result of God's overwhelming silence. He never answered my prayers and, in general, never revealed himself to me in any way, shape, or form. It looked exactly like there was no God. Then, ten years later, I had some extraordinary experiences that led me to conclude that there is a higher power. That higher power is likely enough me--I have discovered that I have many of the key characteristics of God--and likely enough not me. I don't know for sure. What I do know for sure is that there is a God. I believe that this being called God plays an active role in shaping the past, present, and future of this universe. I think that He is making it all up as He goes along, and constantly revising.

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