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Thread: Official Book Thread

  1. #241
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    Reading The Rabbit Hunter by the Lars Kepler duo. I have a man crush on the protagonist.

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    Just finished Homo Dues by Yuval Noah Harari.

    Now I am doing my best to ward of the existential crisis it caused.

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    Finishing up The Dragon Factory by Jonathan Maberry. I really like the static of transgenics as described by the author. It's like, always in the backseat of my mind as I read the book. Suggesting anything and everything in the context related to genetics and virology is possible in a scifi envieroment that is still heavily defined by occurances in the here and now. Giving off a sort of blurred line to reality.
    "The society that separates its scholars from its warriors will have its thinking done by cowards and its fighting by fools." ―Thucydides



  4. #244
    Socionics is a spook ashlesha's Avatar
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    Woman at Point Zero by Nawal El-Saadawi. "based on a true story" about an Egyptian woman facing execution for murder, the horrible trials of her life, and what led her to that point. The authors style of prose and the way she kept repeating certain things didn't really do it for me, but it was still a well written and very emotionally engaging book. I think I gave it 4 stars.

    The Family by Mario Puzzo. A fictional rendering of the life of the Borgia pope and his family. I don't really get into the dry, matter of fact style of writing. I was moved along by the twisty, fast moving plot, out of curiosity, even without caring much one way or the other about what would happen. I had trouble keeping track of the various allegiances, fights, and significance of all the cities and leaders in the book. I gave it 3 stars.

    Little Bird of Heaven by Joyce Carol Oates. A woman is murdered, and her son and the daughter of the accused are drawn into each other's lives. At times in the first half, I got impatient because I felt like it hovered too long sucking every last drop of meaning out of every mundane event, but as the book progressed I fell more deeply into the story. The prose is pretty incredible and quotable and I can't remember the last time I've read a book with characters that felt so full and "real." I gave it 4 stars but it made me want to read more Oates.

    So, First Love by Joyce Carol Oates. A Gothic short story, marketed on the back cover as " incestuous forbidden love" but actually about child molestation. So beautifully written,which i expected. A lot is hinted at and skirted around, engaging the imagination for better or worse. A very distinct mood. My only complaint is that it felt sort of light and one dimensional for a book with such a heavy and disturbing topic. But to be fair Im not sure how much more could have been accomplished in 70 some pages. 4 stars again, but I was considering giving it 5.

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    Quote Originally Posted by reverie View Post
    Alright. I finished In the Shadow of Blackbirds. 5 stars. Really great book. I liked it so much I'm now reading The Cure for Dreaming by Cat Winters, and so far I like it a lot, too. Books I'm thinking of reading next...I was thinking either Neil Gaimans American Gods, or Daphne Du Mauriers My Cousin Rachel. I must stay off the internet and fill my free time with reading. I have a goodreads reading goal to meet and I have 32 more books to go till January 1st... I'm taking this very seriously

    I'm also in the middle of reading my kids Gregor the Overlander by Suzanne Collins. It's ok. I have The House with a Clock in its Walls by Lewis Barnavelt on hold for when we are finished with Gregor the Overlander. I think it sounds pretty awesome. I also have Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark (Collected by American Folklore) by Alvin Schwartz to start after that is done. They both got pretty good reviews, so... (Is obviously ready for Halloween )
    Awesome. I started American Gods, but had to take a break to read A Storm of Swords. I will make my way back to it though. I also read Shirley Jackson's The Haunting of Hill House. I thought it was really good. Much better than the movie, as is usually the case. Glad to meet a fellow horror fan!

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    *AIR RAID SIRENS* ballistic gerbil's Avatar
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    i'm reading The Stand for my third time, loving the ominous creep of the superflu through the first section of the book (and savoring the foreshadowing of things to come).

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    The "Knowledge Trilogy" (The Discoverers, The Creators, The Seekers) by Daniel J. Boorstin is incredible. I've read few books greater, and many books lesser. It is a history and biography of knowledge in "Western Civilization", with many biographies and histories of notable people intertwined. It is like an encyclopedia in terms of its scope, but something you can actually read from beginning to end.

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    I journey onwards into the realms of Jonathan Maberry. Only to follow Joe Ledger. Reading Assassin's Code right now. The Narrative is close to what Alex DeLarge would describe as ultra-violence.
    "The society that separates its scholars from its warriors will have its thinking done by cowards and its fighting by fools." ―Thucydides



  9. #249
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    Quote Originally Posted by reverie View Post
    I started on Stephen Kings Salems Lot. Took me a while to get into. I noticed it takes me a while to get into any Stephen King book. Like at least 60 pages. But I usually start appreciating them half way through. 11/22/63 and It were both enormous books, and anyone who can write a book in which I read a book that long is seriously talented, me thinks. I think he just takes his time in setting things up, maybe that's what it is. Now I'm going to have to read The Stand, too, since @bgdjf brought it up. I keep hearing good things about it!
    And Hearts in Atlantis! Then The Dark Tower. If you miss any of the characters.
    "The society that separates its scholars from its warriors will have its thinking done by cowards and its fighting by fools." ―Thucydides



  10. #250
    *AIR RAID SIRENS* ballistic gerbil's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by reverie View Post
    I started on Stephen Kings Salems Lot. Took me a while to get into. I noticed it takes me a while to get into any Stephen King book. Like at least 60 pages. But I usually start appreciating them half way through. 11/22/63 and It were both enormous books, and anyone who can write a book in which I read a book that long is seriously talented, me thinks. I think he just takes his time in setting things up, maybe that's what it is. Now I'm going to have to read The Stand, too, since @bgdjf brought it up. I keep hearing good things about it!
    11/22/63 i had a bit of a slog to get through, i enjoyed it in the end but it never truly grabbed me like The Stand (especially) and The Dark Tower did.
    Last edited by ballistic gerbil; 09-20-2017 at 08:57 PM.

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    Time to tackle Dostoyevsky
    awldjkwepierpgokqweølfqøerlkfdaergnhtm¨å¨æ''-we-fqpoeufasdøflthøljwtlhkjrøtlhhhhhhhhhhsapfoeporipr
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    I read White Oleander by Janet Fitch and liked it a lot. I would love to read more fiction but I find it difficult to predict what I would enjoy.

    Think I'll try Vernor Vinge next, in the mood for sci fi.

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    Thinking, Fast and Slow by Daniel Kahneman (who won the Nobel prize) is one epic book. It has more insight into the human mind than the entirety of Socionics.

    It also explains why we tend to believe in Socionics explanations.

    Reviews:

    https://www.theguardian.com/science/...-slow-tributes

    https://www.theguardian.com/books/20...aniel-kahneman

  14. #254
    Socionics is a spook ashlesha's Avatar
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    I haven't been reading much lately because I started interview with the vampire by anne rice which is like, just interesting enough for me to not want to ditch it, but not interesting enough to usually be in the mood to read it....

    anybody able to tell me if pretty much stays at the same level throughout or if it picks up? I'm on about page 40 or so.

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    Quote Originally Posted by lump View Post
    I haven't been reading much lately because I started interview with the vampire by anne rice which is like, just interesting enough for me to not want to ditch it, but not interesting enough to usually be in the mood to read it....

    anybody able to tell me if pretty much stays at the same level throughout or if it picks up? I'm on about page 40 or so.
    I would say it is basically the same tone and pace all the way through. I personally thought it was very good.

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    Quote Originally Posted by reverie View Post
    I finally finished Mary Shelley's Frankenstein yesterday. I gave it 5/5. I really liked it, but thinking about the classic Frankenstein movie, I'm really glad they made Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, because I feel like it captures the books atmosphere perfectly and was much closer to the book. I can't even look at the classic the same again because I feel like they really butchered Frankenstein's monster. It still has a sentimental and nostalgic appeal, but I feel like they really just didn't do it justice. I'm kind of disturbed about it after reading the book. It seemed more like a shallow rendition that doesn't capture the complexity of Frankenstein's monster. Kind of insulting. Evidently Mary Shelley wrote Frankenstein at the age of 18. I think that is really incredible. She was with Lord Byron, Pery Shelley, and a few others at the time, and they were bored because of the weather, and Byron challenged that they all write a ghost story.
    I liked The Last Man by her also, although this seems to be an atypical view.

  17. #257
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    George Orwell- 1984. Read and wonder and think and analyse.
    I love Jack London- White Fang, Martin Eden and stories. He is one of my favourite writers.
    Paris Wife- Paula McLain- story of one of Hemingways wifes.

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    awldjkwepierpgokqweølfqøerlkfdaergnhtm¨å¨æ''-we-fqpoeufasdøflthøljwtlhkjrøtlhhhhhhhhhhsapfoeporipr
    "WELL I'M SORRY THAT I LIKE TO HAVE OPEN COMMUNICATION IN MY RELATIONSHIPS" - Galen 2k13

  19. #259
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    Hard Times in Paradise by David and Micki Colfax

    "A man with a definite belief always appears bizarre, because he does not change with the world; he has climbed into a fixed star, and the earth whizzes below him like a zoetrope."
    ........ G. ........... K. ............... C ........ H ........ E ...... S ........ T ...... E ........ R ........ T ........ O ........ N ........


    "Having a clear faith, based on the creed of the Church, is often labeled today as fundamentalism... Whereas relativism, which is letting oneself be tossed and swept along
    by every wind of teaching, looks like the only
    attitude acceptable to today's standards."
    - Pope Benedict the XVI, "The Dictatorship of Relativism"

    .
    .
    .


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    Even though I am an Agnostic, I am reading this Hitch book because I LOVE Hitch.



    Also....



    .....because it looked interesting

  21. #261
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    My ADD progression right now is:
    Ego Tunnel by Thomas Metzinger - exploring how the self manifests
    Deep Learning by Goodfellow et al - well-written exposition of "deep" learning concepts
    Adults in the Room by Varoufakis - talking about the Greek Debt Crisis and the way the insider politics worked during that
    Plus about ten other books as I cycle through unfocused interests.
    Then I just got Peterson's 12 rules yesterday.. all good so far.

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    Socionics is a spook ashlesha's Avatar
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    I'm "reading" a book of essays by Camille Paglia but it's taking me 12 million years bcuz I don't want to let my team down in tri-peaks solitaire.



    Her arrogant trolliness makes her an entertaining writer, though, and she's thought-provoking, even when her essays are reviews of books I've never heard of.

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    Quote Originally Posted by aster View Post
    I finished The Secret History today and I'm still reeling. I'm in love. I'm stunned. I'm mind blown. I think I adore Donna Tartt. One of my new favorite books.


    The beginning, I thought was wonderful, and then the second part, I started reading and couldn't stop and I was dying with anticipation, and then one part, I was so overcome with embarrassment I couldn't read, I covered my shirt over my head, and I was like oh no, I can't watch this go down. And now I'm just stunned, I'm sad, I'm nostalgic. And it was horrible and beautiful and intense and I just loved it.


    I need to find someone else that has read it that loves it to gush about it with. God. I don't think I know anyone that likes this kind of stuff irl.
    https://community.qvc.com/t5/Book-Cl...t/td-p/3434898 ? .... except the conversation's a little old.

    A recent one: https://www.mumsnet.com/Talk/what_we...ut-time-travel mumsnet haha, no idea if the conversation is indepth at all.

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    Richard Noll’s ‘New Preface’ for ‘The Jung Cult’

    PUBLISHED SEPTEMBER 15, 2015 BY ADMIN

    ABSTRACT: Richard Noll is a historian of psychiatry who wrote two controversial volumes on C.G. Jung in the 1990s: The Jung Cult (1994) and The Aryan Christ (1997). A third volume, Mysteria, was also set for publication by Princeton University Press (1994/1995), but was suppressed at the behest of the Jung family. Noll has previously made his ‘New Preface’ to the paperback edition of The Jung Cult available to scholars through gated communities such as Academia.edu and ResearchGate. However, with the permission of the author, the ‘New Preface’ for ‘The Jung Cult’ (1997) is now made available in an ungated format for the first time. – OJJT.
    Preface to the New Edition

    IT IS WITH great pleasure that I introduce this first paperback edition of my book to readers who may have had a difficult time finding the hardcover edition in bookstores.
    When The Jung Cult appeared in September 1994 it was met by tremendous international controversy. Within a few weeks of its appearance, its publisher, Princeton University Press, was inundated with telephone calls and letters from around the world expressing objection to the conclusions I reached in this book. These conclusions were reached only after a careful analysis of published and archival sources on C. G. Jung. Many people who objected to the book never read it, and their reactions came from what others—often their Jungian analysts—told them was in it. The strong reaction to what many heard was in this book still, unfortunately, echoes the opinions of many who consider themselves “Jungians.” A typical reaction was that of a close associate of Jung’s later days who described my work as lacking “even a hook for projection.”
    My hope is that this new paperback edition will find its way into the hands of those who find C. G. Jung a fascinating—or perplexing—figure and who want to learn more about the historical context of his ideas. No other book currently exists that can give you, the reader, an inside look into the historical reality of C. G. Jung’s world during the most creative years of his life (1913-1925). But be warned: this is a book that the Jungian analytic community and the Jung family consider to be forbidden fruit.
    Despite its portrayal as such in Jungian journals, this book is not an exercise in debunking Jung. There is much that I admire about Jung and I owe much—personally and professionally—to some aspects of his work. I am not a fundamentalist Christian (nor a Christian of any sort) looking to burn Jung at the stake for his polytheism and paganism, and I am not a Freudian out for revenge, as some reviewers have incorrectly surmised. What I have tried to do is what Jung himself said many times he preferred: to be seen as the vividly unconventional man that he truly was, warts and all. If there are those who read this book and feel a sense of disappointment, it is because my attempt to put Jung back into history, to show how his ideas were rooted in the cultural currents of his age, conflict with the usual spiritualized—and highly unreal—images of Jung that are found in Memories, Dreams, Reflections. MDR is a book falsely passed off as his autobiography, and its contents are widely disseminated in a vast Jungian literature which uncritically accepts this distorted picture.
    For those who are not scholars and who rely only on what they are told about C. G. Jung in Jungian books and journals, I can understand how some of the material I present in this book may be shocking. If so, the fault lies not in these pages but in the implicit conspiracy of silence concerning the historical truth about Jung and his movement One of the critical issues I raise early in this book is that for generations those near Jung knew the truth behind the distortions that were deliberately presented to the public concerning him; and yet, for various reasons, they kept their silence. The truth about Jung’s conscious falsification of his evidence for a collective unconscious, or about his racialist attitudes and anti-Semitism, or about his lifelong practice of polygamy were all known by people like C. A. Meier and Aniela Jaffé and many others who were in his inner circle for decades — but, to preserve the image of Jung as a guru-like holy man or god-man, they all kept quiet or lied about the evidence. It is ironic that a movement priding itself on making the unconscious conscious can continue to be so resistant to accepting Jung as a human being who lived in a particular cultural context and in a particular era of history. For a variety of complex reasons, there seems to be a great need on the part of not only Jungian analysts but also Jung’s family to keep him out of historical view.
    Why should a historical work on C. G. Jung be so controversial?
    Let me see if I can explore some of the reasons that have made The Jung Cult a topic of hot debate in newspapers throughout Europe, England, South America, and the United States, where a front-page story on the controversy appeared in the New York Times on June 3, 1995.
    The first reason may seem innocuous initially, but it draws our attention precisely to the greater problem at hand: this book is the first comprehensive treatment of the historical context of the early life and work of C. G. Jung. True, there have been books on Jung before this one; however, without exception, they have all imprisoned him within the context of his relationship with Sigmund Freud. Although this was a very important relationship for Jung, his life both before and after Freud has been sorely neglected by scholars because of the almost exclusive focus on his Freudian years. This is true even for a useful book on Jung by Peter Homans, Jung in Context, which unfortunately is ahistorical in its approach and now seems quite out-dated because of this characteristic. But other than the work of Homans and an excellent book by John Kerr, who again puts Jung under the Freudian lens, there is nowhere for an intelligent person with an interest in Jung to go for serious scholarly information. There are armies of Freud scholars; it is a very telling fact that only now, 35 years after Jung’s death, are Jung historians beginning to appear. As I point out in The Jung Cult, Jungians as a rule have always been metaphysicians, not historians. Like Jung, they have traditionally been much more interested in mystery than in history.
    And when believing in myth becomes more important than attempting to discern historical fact, we have a very serious problem indeed.
    Because most Jungians seem to have little interest in history — including their own — they were shocked by what I uncovered and presented in this book. In particular, many expressed disbelief (again, without sifting the evidence for my argument) in my hypothesis that during the years of the Great War Jung deliberately set out to form a religious cult based on Aryan mysticism and polytheistic paganism. In December 1913 Jung had an experience (documented in this book) in which he underwent a visionary initiation into the Hellenistic mysteries of Mithras — the oldest of all the Aryan mystery cults of the Hellenistic world. At the climax of his initiatory experience he became a god — but not just any god: he became the Aryan Christ. Jung believed and acted — consciously — like a religious prophet who sought to bring about a new spiritual age. His “psychological” theories and his therapeutic techniques were based on these core experiences. I argue in this book that his psychological theories of the collective unconscious and the archetypes are essentially masks, a pseudoscientific cover to hide the practices of what was essentially a new religious movement in which Jung taught people to have trance visions and to contact the “gods” directly.
    Jung was a bitter enemy of the orthodoxies of Judeo-Christianity, especially the Roman Catholic Church. Why? Because— and this is what his disciples have long forgotten—Jung believed that Christianity was a Jewish cancer, a “foreign growth” imposed on the Germans (such as himself), which cut them off from their biological and spiritual roots and made them ill. Jews were too “civilized,” too cut off from the natural religion of the sun and sky that the Germans practiced only a thousand years ago. They had no concept of “rebirth” nor any mystery cults, and therefore they could not be redeemed. To maintain the racial purity of his cult in Switzerland, he denied membership to Jews for decades, and in later years maintained a quota on their membership. As late as 1944 Jung’s closest associates, including C. A. Meier, drew; up a secret document which set a “Jewish quota” to Jung’s Psychological Club in Zurich. Jolande Jacobi, Aniela Jaffé, and many other familiar Jungian authors and analysts knew of this and kept silent. Not surprisingly, there was much pro-Nazi sentiment among those in Jung’s Psychology Club in the 1930s. To my knowledge, even as of this late date (1996) no one in Zurich—certainly no one in the Jung family—has ever attempted to make a formal apology for these attitudes or actions.
    Raising such issues only served to open old wounds that Jung’s disciples and his family would have rather kept closed. Although they had been apprised of The Jung Cult and its contents and conclusions many months before it appeared, no one in Jung’s family seemed to take much notice until the hardcover edition of my book finally appeared in September 1994. And then Jung’s family pressured Princeton University, the publisher of that edition, to stop its publication and distribution.
    Princeton University Press is the publisher of the Collected Works of C. G. Jung and of many occultist works of pseudo-scholarship that promote Jungian ideas. Books like the I Ching, Esther Harding’s The 1 and the Not-1, and Erich Neumann’s bizarre works of mystical/Jungian archaeology are, like the Collected Works, part of the publishing program that has earned Princeton—and the Jung family substantial sums over the years. Given the fact that the Jung family and the Jung estate are important to this Ivy League publisher, when complaints about my book came from Switzerland, the editors of Princeton University Press took it quite seriously — so seriously, in fact, that in February 1995 the director of Princeton University Press, two editors, and a retired consultant all flew to Zurich for a weekend of meetings with the Jung family, the agents of the Jung estates (Niedieck Linder), and the keepers of the flame at the Psychological Club in Zurich.
    As I was told by my editor after her return from Zurich, Franz Jung—C. G.’s 86-year-old son—and others in Zurich demanded that The Jung Cult be immediately taken out of distribution. This demand was refused. However, a planned anthology of Jung’s writings on the ancient mysteries, which I edited and to which I had contributed a lengthy introduction, was soon cancelled. Although from a legal point of view the cancellation of the book was entirely legitimate, these actions raised ethical issues which affect not only me but all scholars who may want to do serious scholarly research on C. G. Jung.
    One of the most distressing subtexts to the controversy surrounding The Jung Cult involves the Manuscript Division of the Library of Congress. In the course of polishing The Jung Cult for publication, I learned that a photocopy of the copious clinical notes (and other materials) belonging to an early associate of Jung’s had been deposited at the Library of Congress. These documents were the personal papers of J. J. Honegger, a young physician and assistant to Jung who committed suicide in the spring of 1911. Honegger left no legal provisions for the disposition of his papers, and they subsequently came into the possession of C. G. Jung. Jung kept them for decades, and then one day turned them over to his associate, C. A. Meier. Meier sat on them for years, and then finally deposited them in the archives of the E. T. H. university library in Zurich, where many of Jung’s professional papers are housed. A Jungian disciple in America got possession of photocopies of these documents, kept them himself for some time, and then in November 1993 deposited them in the Library of Congress.
    However, when the Jungians in Switzerland learned that these papers had been deposited in the Library of Congress without their prior knowledge or permission, they demanded that Honegger’s papers be immediately sent back to Switzerland. For two years the Library of Congress refused to send them back to Switzerland, and it was ultimately able to keep them, subject to certain restrictions imposed by the Jung family and their associates. Thus, the Library of Congress refused access to the papers unless the permission of certain Jungians in Zurich was first gained in writing. This proved to be an insurmountable problem. My letters to the Jungians in Switzerland went unanswered—not surprisingly, for apparently they didn’t want anyone to read these documents. I also made persistent requests to the Library of Congress. After the flap over the proposed Freud exhibit that was “postponed,” the Library of Congress answered my requests with a letter stating that the documents were being sent back to the American Jungian from whom they had been received. Case closed.
    Why are Honegger’s papers so important that the Jung inner circle does not want anyone to see them? I believe, and I argue in this volume, that it is because they contain the clinical notes of 1909-1910 on the famous case history of the Solar Phallus Man, which Jung pointed to as the most convincing evidence he had ever encountered of the collective unconscious. The Solar Phallus Man was an institutionalized patient who saw a phallus hanging from the sun. Jung argued throughout his life that this patient was describing an image from an ancient mystery cult liturgy that had only been translated and published in 1910— supposedly years after the delusion had been reported. Jung thought the delusion was based on material arising from an archaic, phylogenetic layer of the unconscious mind. As I demonstrate in this book, Jung had a tendency to lie about many, indeed most, of the details of this case over the course of his career. These clinical notes likely contain the truth — but it is perhaps a truth that the Jung family and Jung’s remaining disciples do not want revealed. There is a distinct possibility that the publication of the Honegger papers will demonstrate conclusively not only that C. G. Jung was mistaken about his idea of a collective unconscious but that he lied about this case later in order to cover up his mistake.
    Unless and until the Jung family releases Honegger’s papers, the public will not know the facts of the matter.
    That said, there is much work yet to be done for young scholars who want to fill in the missing parts of the story of C. G. Jung. I wrote The Jung Cult with future generations of scholars in mind. There is no need to wait for the Jung family to open Jung’s personal documents to historians. Tucked away, unread, in archives all over the world is a wealth of material that can add to our woefully incomplete knowledge of this extraordinary man and his life. Jung had not only colleagues to whom he wrote but also several generations of disciples, many of whom kept dream diaries and other documents. Since the latter were generally wealthy and had a sense of history, they were able to provide for the safety of this material, so that a surprising number of such items have survived.
    This volume, then, is a beginning. I leave it to others to complete the story.
    Richard Noll, Ph.D.

    http://ojjt.org/2015/09/richard-noll...the-jung-cult/



  25. #265
    ouronis's Avatar
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    I am about done reading this and I think the main character's POV is Fi (or at least introverted feeler) https://www.goodreads.com/work/quotes/48253660-borne


  26. #266
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    @ouronis, I started reading a book in the trilogy by Jeff VanderMeer and got to page three before I abandoned it. I thought it might be a fluke and felt I should give his writing another chance and I found this: https://www.tor.com/2017/11/08/this-...l-of-monsters/,
    but this time I again only got about to page three.

    Even though the guy seems to be getting awards, I find him to be unreadable.

    I don't think the problem is his Fi-base, if he is Fi-base. I picked up a book called "Linger" by Maggie Stiefvater and immediately recognized it as a clear window into the mind of an ESI. VanderMeer's writing is just unreadable to me.

  27. #267
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    Quote Originally Posted by Adam Strange View Post
    @ouronis, I started reading a book in the trilogy by Jeff VanderMeer and got to page three before I abandoned it. I thought it might be a fluke and felt I should give his writing another chance and I found this: https://www.tor.com/2017/11/08/this-...l-of-monsters/,
    but this time I again only got about to page three.

    Even though the guy seems to be getting awards, I find him to be unreadable.

    I don't think the problem is his Fi-base, if he is Fi-base. I picked up a book called "Linger" by Maggie Stiefvater and immediately recognized it as a clear window into the mind of an ESI. VanderMeer's writing is just unreadable to me.
    I found the writing to be stilted, not the best I've ever read. The story too. The setting is mostly mangled tropes. But ultimately I was able to immerse anyway. All in all I've enjoyed it as a light read.

    The character's pov reads like Fi, with the character being EII and the author interjecting the vivid descriptions of things.

  28. #268
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    Ultimately, I read for edification and I prefer that the author have some style and grace. The number of authors whose stories meet those criteria for me is almost nil now.

    Snow Crash and The Diamond Age and Interface were the last books I read that approached that standard.

    I just read a short story by Neil Gaiman which was very readable and meant nothing.
    Gun, with Occasional Music, by Jonathan Lethem, is a tour de force of style and is lots of fun, but is just a pleasant way to waste time.

    I just read The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo, which was both readable and enjoyable. I think the girl is clearly ILI and Mikael Blomkvist is clearly SEE. I enjoyed spending time with them, but I didn't learn anything.

    A friend gave me a copy of The Later Roman Empire (A.D. 354-378) by Ammianus Marcellinus, and I found it to be not that great stylistically, but was very interesting from the standpoint of what the author thought was worth reporting. It is very hard to find books which combine style and information.

    The problem might be with me.
    Last edited by Adam Strange; 03-08-2018 at 04:02 AM.

  29. #269
    Socionics is a spook ashlesha's Avatar
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    I've gotten back into the habit of reading for the last few days and I finally finished paglias "sex, art, and American culture." I've talked about her in a few posts already so maybe it's overkill but I like the closure of talking about something after I read it. She's a good author for where I am internally right now, wanting to kinda shake some dust bunnies loose in my head, get things moving, you know, because she's challenging and her polarizing, hyperbolic style makes her impossible to brush off or read without thinking. The thing I really took away from the book as useful in that respect is this idea of eclecticism and historical context, seeing things as they have developed and continue to within this huge timeframe of human history and accounting for the things you feel in your gut, the sex of it, less intellectualized, and pulling from various areas without too much specialization. I guess this is why she focuses so goddamn much on her generation in the 60s and how the postmodernist French intellectuals in the 70s fucked everything up, blah, blah, but it can feel kinda like the 50 yr olds I know who only listen to 80s music and just can't get over their youths lol. My favorite part of the book was the transcript of people asking her questions and her answers because seeing her in a position where she's sort of defending her ideas in a dialogue in a way where she's not being *totally* polarizing bcuz of due respect to the people listening to her I felt like I was getting where she stands better than when she's waving her arms around to get attention. As entertaining as she is when she's being a complete bitch, I wish there was more of that.
    Last edited by ashlesha; 03-13-2018 at 02:03 PM.

  30. #270
    cunnilingus epilepsy inducer
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    This year:

    Against the Ethicists by Sextus Empiricus
    Skin in the Game by Nassim Taleb
    The Master and His Emissary by Iain Mcgilchrist (re-read but did not finish re-read)
    Aesop's Fables (currently reading)
    Last edited by leckysupport; 03-21-2018 at 02:36 PM.
    ἀταραξία

  31. #271
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    Quote Originally Posted by aster View Post
    Haven't read that one, but I read her Raven Cycle series, and they seemed so Gamma to me. I think her main character Blue was ESI E4 and her love interest, Gansey, was LIE-Ni 8w7.
    Many thanks, @aster. Now I have something else to read.

    It is really interesting and odd to spend time inside the head of a dual.

  32. #272
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    I've been really enjoying Schopenhauer's "The World as Will and Idea" especially since it inspired Jung to create his typology.

  33. #273
    Socionics is a spook ashlesha's Avatar
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    Finished James Baldwin's If Beale Street Could Talk. I'm not blown away by his novels as much as I am by his social essays (with the important exception of Giovannis Room), but of course it was solid. I found myself oddly relieved when it ended before the resolution and then realized I didn't really want to know what was going to happen.

    About to start Petersons 12 Rules and find out what the big deal is about lobsters.

  34. #274
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    War and peace - it's like watching a period TV show but a lot better.

  35. #275
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    @aster When I read the first Throne of Glass book, I almost sent one of the romantic banter scenes to my SLE friend b/c I felt she would love it. It is actually exactly like how her real relationships are.

  36. #276
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    I'm reading the Burrow and other short stories by kafka, I love kafka. He is like a spiritual guide, artistic mentor, parent figure all in one. When I read him I feel nourished beyond anything I've ever experienced. The most moving things I read of his were actually his diaries and Conversations with Kafka by Gustav Janouch. Both of them had me breaking down and laughing out loud in cafes.

  37. #277
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    the shadow of the wind by carlos ruiz zafón





    awldjkwepierpgokqweølfqøerlkfdaergnhtm¨å¨æ''-we-fqpoeufasdøflthøljwtlhkjrøtlhhhhhhhhhhsapfoeporipr
    "WELL I'M SORRY THAT I LIKE TO HAVE OPEN COMMUNICATION IN MY RELATIONSHIPS" - Galen 2k13

  38. #278

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    I love Asian literature. I finished The House of Sleeping Beauties by Yasunari Kawabata. Now I'm reading:

    Spring Snow by Yukio Mishima
    Moshi Moshi by Banana Yoshimoto

    I also love books on self-improvement & psychology. I enjoyed Don't Shoot The Dog by Karen Pryor, and I'm also reading Marsha Linehan's work on DBT on people with BPD.

    Other authors I like are Kurt Vonnegut and Milan Kundera.

  39. #279
    ooo's Avatar
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    the biography of James de Rothschild (lol I can't drop it!)

  40. #280
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    Osamu Dazai is the Japanese Bukowski - short novels about loser protagonists with ... life ... problems. Anyway, I find that sort of novel a very compelling read and I blazed through No Longer Human and then picked up The Setting Sun, which I'm reading now.

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