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06-23-2006, 05:19 AM
I've really been looking into some MBTI et al descriptions of INTJ, and this came up and struck me as intersting, because it relates personally --


Page 182 of "Please Understand Me (I)"


Costeffectiveness is a concept which has a strong imperative for INTJs, who frequently select occupations in engineering, particularly human engineering. They also can be found in the physical sciences, in rolse which require development , such as curriculum building, and in general, any job which requires the creation and appliacation of technology in complex areas

I was wondering just what is meant by "human engineering". I looked it up and http://www.answers.com/main/ntquery?s=Human%20Engineering&gwp=16#after_ad2
had some to do with ergonomics, but this stands out most for me -


Ergonomics

The branch of science that deals with human work and the efficient use of energy, including anatomical, physiological, biomechanical, and psychosocial factors.

That does interest me a lot, but on a larger scale than, say, how to fit a chair to a workdesk, of course.


So, for now, my question is - do you have any advice for someone who is interested in such? I'm going to bring up this sort of thing when I see my guidance conselor in a few months back at university. (She knows I'm an INTJ as per discussion of such)

mimisor
06-27-2006, 11:41 AM
Aha...You have a guidance counselor? :?

06-27-2006, 11:59 AM
"Academic Advisor"

Whatever they're called.

Scrummy
06-27-2006, 01:02 PM
I'm familiar with traditional ergonomics in the form of the Alexander Technique. I know they train instructors and practitioners. You might want to look into the system, even though it is nothing more than teaching the most efficient use of the body in the mundane activities (sitting, standing, walking, running, speaking, etc.). On what level did you want to apply this stuff?


Aha...You have a guidance counselor? :?
Most people in high school and universities in the U.S. have one - usually, they just help you develop a course of study that will suit your ultimate carreer goals.

06-27-2006, 02:23 PM
I'm familiar with traditional ergonomics in the form of the Alexander Technique. I know they train instructors and practitioners. You might want to look into the system, even though it is nothing more than teaching the most efficient use of the body in the mundane activities (sitting, standing, walking, running, speaking, etc.). On what level did you want to apply this stuff?


Then I need to look into something else. That is not the priority of what I care about. Yeah, I consider such things, but my main focus is on things that are not so mundane. A different sort of human engineering.

It has come to my occurance
that most people have no idea how to go about life as a human, or what that entials.

Furthermore, in a lot of my studying lately, I'm trying to work on ways to improve in that area - progress. Human progress and the like. But before we can really go forward, we have to make sure everyone can stand on their two feet, instead of crawling around on their hands and knees.

Of course, the further you go into that... the more complicated it becomes. I know, subjectively for myself, what I consider progress and improvement forward. But how to translate taht into other things... other people, other situations, other countries, cultures, and continents.... that is the more of an issue. But I know I have to start with myself first, and hopefully I can learn from there and along the way. It is a complicated matter that I don't have written out very well at this time, but it is greatly in my mind.

pokeball
06-27-2006, 10:51 PM
"The branch of science that deals with human work and the efficient use of energy, including anatomical, physiological, biomechanical, and psychosocial factors." does not have to deal with furniture only....

My INTj friend has degees in botany and soil science. A lot of his ideas when I talk about horticultural genetics are about productivity, usefulness of mass crops, efficiency of usage.... For example, he was curious if I could make a Japanese Ramana Rose hybrid to have gold blooms (which is a highly productive color due to ultraviolet spectrums and insect attraction to pollen) with better a branching habit (which equates to more blooms due to more stems within vertical and horizontal space) yet retain their massive hip size while reducing the seed count. This way he could use the same amount of land for: rose honey, rose beer and rose jam (personally Id use the September harvest of ping pong sized hips for vitamin C tablets but whatever) in the most efficient way possible.


So, as you can see, many things can be efficient uses in the terms stated...

06-28-2006, 01:55 AM
While not the most convincing matter - roses.... -, I get your points.
"The branch of science that deals with human work and the efficient use of energy, including anatomical, physiological, biomechanical, and psychosocial factors." does not have to deal with furniture only....


In my opinion a lot of things can be done better, or more efficiently, if you will. So perhaps I will look into it further.


Also, the nature of logotherapy, which came up in some material I've lately read

pokeball
06-28-2006, 02:17 AM
Im glad you get the point.