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Thread: A Primer On My Personality Research (2) - Exertion Theory (dual-types)

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    Default A Primer On My Personality Research (2) - Exertion Theory (dual-types)

    Humans adapt to their environment by modeling it in the brain, and if they are
    smart, modeling the outcome of potential changes to it. Changes to the environment
    create a new state for it, which in turn may be modeled for reasons of determining
    what the outcome of the changed environmental situation will be. We can discern
    two elements of information processing: the "metabolic" form of environmental
    perception before and after change, and the "exerted" form of cause/effect
    analysis.

    We thus perceive a division of kinds of information in the brain, one belonging
    to an "information" domain that models perceptions, and the other belonging to
    an "energy" or "work" domain of learned possible approaches to change and their
    outcomes. Because the modeling of conscious information is by its nature
    psychological, we may extend this principle of divided information to include
    the entire psyche and each of its aspects. We thus say that the division of
    information into domains perceived and energetic is a general attribute of psyche.



    The "Model-A" proposed by Aushura Augusta captures the perceptive side of
    the psyche quite well. Inspired by C.G. Jung's theory of psychological types and
    confident that a better understanding of the differences between people was
    attainable, Augusta sought and found a theory of information perception that had
    been put forward some decades earlier by Anton Kepinsky. Kepinsky, who had created
    the theory in response to the problem of psychopathology, had limited himself,
    like Jung, to the matters of problematic perception which his patients were faced
    with. This point is important, that the forebearer of socionics were clinicians,
    who were faced on a daily basis with the task of finding treatment for people who
    had by their definition deep problems of perception. These clinicians believed
    that the best way to treat their patients was to meet them on their own ground,
    persuading them to view the world in a more adaptable light on terms they could
    understand. This method, inherited from Freud and still dominant today,
    necessitated effective models of perception, the development of which was
    considered by clinicians a matter of professional concern. The belief dominant
    then, and still now, was that if only one could treat the issues of erroneous
    perception, then the behavioral issues would correct themselves. Therefore,
    thought clinicians, the study of behavioral patterns itself was a waste of time
    and energy when better breakthroughs in the understanding of perception, they
    believed, lied just beyond the theoretical horizon. Furthermore, B.F. Skinner
    had already demonstrated that behavior was to a degree conditioned on the basis
    of perceived reward, and although the behaviorists were wholly unconcerned with
    patterns of perception the clinicians thought the study of behavior best left to
    Skinner and his acolytes, with little to no interplay between the two fields.

    For all of these reasons Aushura Augusta found no dearth of information from which
    to construct her desired model of relationships between healthy people, and for
    that reason was inherently limited in the scope of her conclusions. Having
    available only theories of perception from which to construct the basis for her
    relational theory, she limited herself to the consideration of perception and
    presumed, for good or ill, exertion modeling at any given point in her "ring"
    model of progressive perception to be dependent on the same psychological
    functions which dictated perception at the same point in the cycle. Had she
    considered an alternate viewpoint (which may not have been available to her; more
    on this later), she might have realized that people can have very different ideas
    about what kinds of activity may be influenced by their choice of perceptions.
    Therefore because we consider the domains of metabolism and exertion, perception
    and energy distinct from each other, our considerations are removed from Augusta's
    (erroneous) hypothesis that they were unseperate, and therefore from the
    ideological stream of the theoretical institution she founded. (not withstanding
    a direct challenge from within it, which has yet to materialize)

    Having considered where our situation places us from a sociotheoretic context, let us
    discuss what the existence of seperate metabolism and exertion types means to our
    understanding of personality.

    When the brain receives new information, it is stored as various forms of memory.
    These memories comprise the basis for our recognition of persistences of
    perception and therefore, our recognition of our own existence. In addition to
    recognizing our own existence, we further recognize persistences of situation
    and the existence of preferential responses to these situations. Situations
    form the content of our perceptions, just as memories of appropriate response form
    the content of our adaptation strategies. Together these memories form the
    "observation of self-relationship to world" we call psyche.

    Having previously divided the psyche into seperate domains information and
    exertion, we can see that in the interest of survival it is beneficial for one
    to remember -- when considering either the matters of perception relevant to
    information metabolism or the matters of action relevant to exertion -- to recall
    from the psyche those memories which seem relevant to the situation; specifically,
    which perceptions of one's situation are most effective, and which actions will
    best change or influence the situation at hand. The observation of these recalls,
    when we can very easily observe in the behavior of ourselves and others, suggests
    a relationship between the information domain and information metabolism, and the
    energy domain and information exertion.

    The question is, how to structure the relationship between metabolism and
    exertion? Due to the accuracy of Augusta's model-A in modeling information
    metabolism, we can include her theory of personality as one half of our scheme.
    The question remaining to us then, is how to model the second half? What is
    the second half, the exertion domain, like and how do we describe it. To
    understand the exertion domain and its contents, let us examine the substance
    and consequences of Augusta's theory in more detail.

    Like Jung, Augusta suggests that people perceive the world by means of
    functions of psychological processing. These functions have orientation --
    outward or inward, extroverted or introverted -- and specific interests. Augusta,
    however, went further by suggesting that although the functions existed in the
    mind, they could only apprehend the information that met their criterion of
    interest. This meant that each of the functions of the psyche corresponded to
    specific kinds of information elements that existed independently of the mind,
    in the physical world no less. Indeed, Augusta reasoned that there existed a
    precise physical correlation between the psyche and the physical world of static
    and kinetic energies; she even used these precepts to phrase her definitions
    of the eight functions. This point is important: that there exist only eight
    kinds of information available to our perceptions. If we cannot percieve a
    form of information, then we cannot prove it exists experimentally and thus,
    cannot be certain of its existence. Such information is necessarily non-objective
    and useless to our considerations. Given that all of our perceptions are
    accounted for by the functions of our metabolism types, actions, too, must be
    considered in the lense of the eight elements. Therefore we divide the spectrum
    of exerted actions, like our perceptions, into eight distinct categories, each
    of which corresponds to a kind of information. Further, because we can only act
    on the basis of information we are immediately aware of, it is necessary for the
    actions we exert to be performed in the context of the metabolism function we
    are using to perceive our environment at the moment of our intended exertion.
    We further reckon that our exerted energies will influence the environment
    itself, and thereby our perception of it. Given that we can only settle on one
    perception before going through with an activity, we must have moved forward
    from our previous position in Model-A to the next position in the chain. We
    therefore conclude that exerted activities act as mediators of transition from
    one function of perception to another. Because there are eight functions of
    perception there exist eight transitions, and therefore eight mediations and
    eight exerted functions to perform them. The question remaining to us is, what
    is the order of the exerted functions, and how do we explain their relationship
    to each other? To answer this question we must consider the original genesis
    of Model-A itself, and of the Jungian typological ordering that preceded it.

    The origin of modern typology schemes begins with Jung. In 1921 he published an
    essay titled "Psychological Types", in which he discussed typology on the basis
    of two principles, attitude and function. Attitudes, said Jung, could be either
    introverted or extroverted depending on how they related to the concept of
    psychological object. To Jung, the "object" was not a body in space; rather, it
    was a circumstance or concept that demanded attention due to its relevance to
    matters of immediate survival. Like Freud, Jung followed Darwin in believing that
    those psychic aspects which were possessed by humans existed due to their relevance
    to survival. Given that thought was itself a trait of humans, it could not be
    excluded from the possession of its own role in the scheme of human survival.
    Jung considered thought a form of energy, called libido, which was directed toward
    the object, a conception of the relevance of psychic experience to objective
    matters of survival. An extroverted person, observed Jung, survived by attempting
    to assimilate themselves to this object, to relate to it and to bind with it.
    By becoming a part of the object, reasoned the extrovert, one becomes attuned to
    the methods of survival represented by the object and freed from all threat of
    personal destruction; for if the object exists as a representation of the means
    by which to survive, then for as long as means exist for survival the object
    will remain intact and essentially immortal. Thus the extrovert has evolved to
    perceive the object as a source of immortality that denies death.

    The introvert takes a different view. Survival, says the introvert, seeks itself
    at the expense of all else. The introvert views this prerogative as unacceptable:
    spontaneous adaptation without order is to be abhorred because it creates a sense
    of chaos that is torturous to the psyche. The introvert desires to seperate
    themselves from the object, to stand apart from it and free from its influence in
    the service of psyche. Whereas the extrovert attempts to feed the object by means
    of their energy, and thereby attain immortality along with it, the introvert
    seeks to weaken the object in favor of their own psychically motivated goals.
    It is not the pursuit of survival, but the freedom of experience from the chains
    of necessity that the introvert desires. Says Jung, the introvert attempts to
    withdraw libido from the object, to put the object to work for themselves. The
    introvert observes the lengths extroverts go to sustain the object, even to
    their own deaths, and looks upon these terminations of personal experience -- of
    psyche destroyed -- with apprehension and dismay: they see the object as the
    enemy of psyche, just as the extrovert sees the psyche as the enemy of the
    object. For this reason they regard the varying manifestations of extrovert
    assimilation -- collective action, obedience to a leader, loyalty to a group,
    etc. -- with skepticism and suspicion. The introvert distrusts the object and
    accordingly seeks to withdraw interest from it at every opportunity.

    Jung believed the attitudes found expression through functions of relationship
    between elements of the attitudes themselves. Jung distinguished four functions
    of each attitude, calling them thinking, feeling, intuition, and sensation.
    To each of these functions Jung accorded a definition. Thinking was defined as
    the relationship of an attitude to its contrast; feeling the relationship of an
    attitude to itself. Sensation functioned as the perception of the contrasting
    attitude, whereas intuition was the means of an attitude's self perception.
    Given that each attitude was in possession of all four functions, there could
    be distinguished eight functions in total.

    Jung realized from his own experience that one could not perceive the world with
    two or more functions simultaneously. Rather, one must choose which function
    to use, a matter Jung believed determined by one's self confidence in the
    function's use. Asking himself from whence this confidence came, Jung determined
    confidence itself to be, like other aspects of his personal experience, an
    evolutionary trait. Confidence, said Jung, could be defined as the perception of
    personal aptitude to the demands of a situation. If a person were unconfident
    about a situation, it was due to their self-perception of their functions as
    being unequal to the situation's demands. Conversely, a person who felt confident
    in themselves did so because they perceived themselves as being capable of the
    task before them. Confidence, then, evolved as a natural self-signaling or
    personal compass by which individuals could avoid potentially untenable
    situations and seek out those situations best suited to themselves. However it
    is not the situation that brings confidence, but the match of one's instincts
    to the present situation. Instincts are in-born and cannot be
    changed. It is necessary that the criterion for confidence be determined by
    instinctual factors for this very reason, to have a pillar of constancy about
    which one may self-orient. There is, then, no true distinction
    between the suitability of one's instincts to a situation, and one's confidence
    in it. Jung had other criterion for confidence, as well. One of these
    was the concept of differentiation, described by him as the ability to identify
    situation relevant phenomena. The higher a function's differentiation level, the
    better its ability to extract information relevant to the present situation
    from one's environs. There existed, therefore, a correlation between a function's
    level of differentiation and its powers of adaptation. Because confidence is
    dependent on one's ability to adapt, confidence in a function corresponds to
    its level of differentiation. Therefore, said Jung, the attitude and function
    in which one possessed the most confidence was the master of one's personal
    behavior. If a person was most confident relating to the object, they were
    extroverted; if most confident relating to the psyche, introverted. If most
    confident in their ability to relate, rational; if most confident in their
    ability to perceive, irrational. Indeed, the concepts of confidence and
    adeptitude can themselves be contrasted, respectively, as introverted and
    extroverted perceptions of the same idea.

    Jung believed the dominant attitude itself in possession of confidence, which
    it invested in its strongest function. This pairing mastered the personality.
    Jung believed in the existence of four attitude-function pairings in a single
    person, which he called "function-types". The function-types were ordered in
    sequence of apprehension by the master pairing, which first sought to repress
    the attitude opposite itself by setting the strongest function-type of the
    opposing attitude in immediate succession to itself. For the master's influence
    to be successfully received by the opposing attitude, it was necessary for the
    opposing attitude to be represented in the personality by a function-type that
    was capable of conducting the receival. Jung observed that the rational functions
    always received information from the irrational functions, and the irrational
    functions always from the rational. Therefore if the master function-type were
    rational, then the succeeding, or auxiliary, function type was necessarily
    irrational. Conversely, if the master function-type were irrational, the
    auxiliary function-type would need to be rational, or else no communication
    between the function-types could take place. In this way an introvert could
    impress upon the extroverted world the existence of their subjective experience
    in terms the extrovert could understand, and the extrovert their awareness of
    the object in terms the introvert could acknowledge.


    Jung called the primary function and its auxiliary the ego -- effectively uniting
    them with Freud's concept of the same --, and the third and
    fourth, which the primary had brought to heel, the unconscious. Jung limited the
    quantity of functions in the personality to four to represent the archetype of
    mandala, a four-sided figure believed to represent wholeness. (the Christian
    cross, the alchemaic philosopher's stone or lapis, the "tenemos" sacred space,
    etc.) He does not specify attitude orientation rules for the unconscious
    functions, referring to them as functions only. Although Jung numbers his
    functions, he does not suggest a specific order of progression for them. There
    does exist, however, an implied order; for the primary unconscious function,
    called by Jung the "inferior", and its auxiliary rise in retribution to the
    conscious attitude. For them to rise in retribution to the ego, they must follow
    it sequentially: first the ego, then the constellated unconscious. We can draw
    a further implication, one of relation to the attitude of the inferior function
    and its auxiliary, by noting, as Jung did, that the conscious attitude is
    compensated for by the unconscious attitude. This is the extroverted attitude
    in the case of an introvert-oriented ego, and an introverted attitude in the
    case of an extrovert orientation. The existence of this dynamic implies that
    the attitude of the inferior function-type is in opposition to that of the
    primary, and likewise, the attitude of the inferior auxiliary opposite that of
    the primary auxiliary/second function. We conclude that the unconscious always
    appears following the ego's auxiliary, and always in exact opposition to the ego
    in terms of both attitude and function.

    In summary, Jung's typology consisted of four functions, each of which could
    be oriented toward either evolutionary "objective" ends or toward "subjective"
    experiential observations. The former is an extroverted attitude, the latter an
    introverted one. To each person were allowed four function-attitude pairings,
    (function-types) the strongest of which attempted to subvert the attitude
    opposite itself by means of the next strongest. This prompted the emergence of
    the unconscious as a retributionary force on the part of the attitude opposite
    the strongest, carried out by the fourth and third strongest, respectively.
    For example, an extroverted thinking function-type may have as its auxiliary
    either introverted intuition or introverted sensing, the use of which will
    constellate the retribution of the unconscious in the form of introverted
    feeling and the introverted irrational function not paired with extroverted
    thinking. The movement of consciousness from extroverted thinking to introverted
    feeling's auxiilary (and back again to extroverted thinking) reveals the
    "wholeness" archetype to be as the primary mover of not just the pursuit of
    psychic wholeness, but of personality itself.

    As regards Anton Kepenski's work we know little. Let us for the sake of
    completeness relegate the influence of Kepenski on the development of Model-A
    to the background for the remainder of this discussion, and turn our attention
    to Augusta and Jung's influence on her.

    Two legacies of Jung's work are immediately evident in Model-A, the base
    function, which corresponds to Jung's primary function, and the creative
    function, which corresponds to Jung's primary auxiliary or secondary function.
    From there, the similarities grow murkier. Augusta maintained Jung's assertion
    that the unconscious is manifested by the inferior function set, however she
    takes a step further by labeling Jung's unconscious the "super-id" and Jung's
    primary function set the "ego". From here she postulates that everyone
    possesses every function, not just four, and assigns the half of the function
    spectrum not already paired into the ego and super-id to Sigmund Freud's
    concepts of the superego and id. The superego, says Augusta, mediates the
    relationship between the ego and the super-id/inferior function set. Likewise,
    the id mediates the transition from unconsciousness to consciousness. Obeying
    Jung's rules of function pairing as a matter of cognitive necessity, Augusta
    reverses the attitude of the ego to create the id, and the attitude of the
    super-id to create the superego. Thus the functions are ordered in pairings
    ego, superego, super-id, and id, by order of differentiation. In Model-A
    differentiation levels are cyclical, rising and falling as the biochemical
    underpinnings of the functions degrade and resurge. The ego is the most
    differentiated and most confident pairing; it supresses the manifestation of
    the opposite attitude by suppressing its energy. Following the ego is the
    superego, which is dominated by the other function of the same attitude and
    class as the ego. Its partner's relationship to the ego is similar, possessing
    the alternative function of the same attitude and class to that of the
    creative/secondary function. Although the superego represses the unconscious
    super-id due to its attitude polarity, the ego's repression of the id is
    stronger, thus allowing the super-id to follow after the superego. Like Jung's
    unconscious function set, the super-id is in absolute opposition to the ego in
    both attitude and function, providing the "gateway" to the unconscious. Augusta
    reasons that the unconscious is not only compensatory but complementary to the
    ego. The search for an ideal incarnation of this complementarity in another
    person, says Augusta, is the driving force in individual life and by extension,
    society itself. Augusta refers to this complementarity as dual-seeking, and
    its collective pursuit the motive for social activity. She calls this motive
    and the activity it creates "socionic" due to its semi-predictable, systematic
    quality. The collective of all such personalities, she says, are the "socion".

    The transition from unconsciousness back to consciousness is carried out by
    the emergence of the repressed id. We know little of Augusta's understanding
    of the id, save that she called its dominant function the accessor of "personal
    knowledge" and its auxiliary the ". These descriptions are hardly sufficient for
    a proper understanding of their role, and for this reason we will return to them
    later in this discussion.

    Looking at the relationship of the four function pairings each to its opposite,
    it is easy to be stricken as regards the standards for understanding in our
    times as regards the clarity of the relationships to logical apprehension. Is
    it not to be expected that the confident ego would seek to repress the anxious,
    impulsive id? Would it not be the discipline of the consensus-reliant superego
    to disdain the mysticism of the unconscious super-id? We could just as easily
    see the four pairings as characters in themselves: the heroic ego conquering
    the diabolical id, the wise ruler standing in contrast to the inane court
    jester. It is not by accident that these correspondences exist; however for
    the time being let us turn our attention away from this matter to the
    consideration of the functions .

    Augusta draws a clear distinction between functions, which she defines as
    placeholders for consideration of a kind of psychic content, and the content
    itself, which she calls elements of information. The functions, Augusta makes
    clear, are invarible and shared by everyone: they are roles assigned to the
    information elements which are observed when the function is in use. The
    information elements are the form the function takes, and are analogous to
    Jung's function-type concept. However, Augusta takes Jung's concept one step
    farther, analoging the psyche to the physical world. Corresponding to the
    information elements, says Augusta, are information aspects: These aspects
    are independent of the mind: they are, in fact, elements of physical reality.
    Augusta postulates that the mind apprehends the physical world because it
    possesses information element processing systems that can perceive the
    aspects. There exists a corresponding information element to every function-type
    in Jung's psychology, and a corresponding information aspect thereto. This
    is the distinctive mark of Augusta's typology: the world is perceived due to
    compatibilities of mind to the environment, without which there can be no
    processing of information and therefore, no recognition of phenomena. The
    world is neither seperate from the mind nor the mind seperate from the world:
    the two are inseperable halves of an essential whole. Were either not to exist,
    there would be no apprehension of existence and therefore, no existence at all.
    This dualism, which bears unmistakable parallels to Albert Einstein's theory of
    relativity (for reasons we will discuss later) -- that reality is dependent on
    the observer -- is at once a statement of philosophical truth and psychic fact.
    It is philosophical in that it demonstrates an inexorable link between
    information and perception, and psychic in that it captures the relationship
    between the object and the subject as an essential union vital to the correct
    apprehension of reality, an instance of Jung's syzygy archetype, no less. There
    exists only what we perceive, and no more. There is no supraordinate truth
    inaccessible to mankind, only functions of varying degrees of awareness. The
    greater our awareness of an information aspect, the more we can understand about
    it. Because there exists in the socion a type suited to the correct
    understanding of each aspect, it lies within the capacity of humanity to
    apphrehend all that exists, now and forever. There are no limits, in other words.

    It is this statement about the enduring power of human society to master the
    world's information that reveals the true relevance and extent of Augusta's
    theory. The information elements speak to potentials in the here and now and
    into the indefinite future. The ring of Model-A turns forever, from
    consciousness to unconsciousness and back again. Just as each person possesses
    a type, so does each person possess strengths and weaknesses, the use of which
    characterize their contributions and their vices. In each of us, Model-A plays
    a vital, if not defining, role. It defines our talents as well as our
    ineptitudes, our tolerances and our depreciations, our acceptances and our
    dismissals. And yet we are defined, by Model-A, as not solitary characters, but
    halves of a desperately sought whole to which we will spare no resource, no
    effort to experience in its fullest degree.

    Model-A's apprehension demands of us many questions. To accept Model-A, we must
    accept its philosophy and observe its consequences to our apprehension of our
    existence. The relativism of our modern age, who Einstein fathered, is
    superseded by the dualism inherent in Model-A. We are similarly confronted with
    the fact that Einstein himself possessed a type, the organization of which
    played a key part in his discoveries. Without the structure represented by
    Model-A, Einstein could not have created his discoveries. Without the cycle of
    consciousness into unconsciousness, from the extroverted attitude of objective
    apphrehension and assimilation to the introverted attitude of subjective
    relativism, Einstein could never have concluded that the objective reality we
    observe is dependent on our own subjective dispositions. Model-A reveals to
    us that the reverse is equally true, that our subjective dispositions are
    beholden to our environment. Within the lense of this dualism, philosophy's
    ignorance of Model-A is immediately consequential. We are inclined to question
    the assertions of the man who would impress his own private experience upon
    others in opposition to their worldview. The revolutionary who says the world
    is this way and not that way seems at once suspect and unreliable. Just as
    Model-A builds upon the model offered by Jung, so do all advances in human
    understanding appear as elaborated, ever more precise models of the phenomenon
    we apprehend. It is neither proper nor truthful to purport that a
    long-established precedent, such as the existence of time, is outright wrong.
    The assertion of such amounts to the supression of time's perception as an
    unconscious factor: time continues to exist, but the individual in question
    chooses to repress the perception of it, or to dismiss its importance in favor
    of other elements of their experience. As we shall see, Model-A does not
    provide rationale for this person's denial alone; indeed, it anticipates its
    very eventuality.

    Model A reckons eight aspects of information. These aspects are classified
    along three axes: objects vs. fields, statics vs. dynamics, and internal vs.
    external. Augusta acknowledged the orientations described by Jung as "introvert"
    and "extrovert". She observed that the extrovert was cheifly concerned with
    the observation of objects that were of immediate consequence to their
    environment. Augusta's definition of "object" is very broad: anything that is
    considered in the singular is an object. By managing the objects around oneself
    effectively, one effectively assimilates to the larger "psychological object"
    the set of all objects comprise. The extrovert is ever witness to the objects
    that surround them: each is considered independently, and never as a single
    transience. If a set is apprehended at all, then it exists only as an "object"
    in itself, and can be manipulated as such. Orientation to the object-aware
    world draws one's attention to the objects themselves, their movement, their
    properties, their relationships to each other and to themselves. Their
    relationships Augusta termed their "dynamics" because relations are the motive
    for change. Their movements and properties Augusta observed as their "statics"
    because they are representative of time-transient factors that are intrinsic
    to the objects themselves: although they can be augmented, they cannot be
    changed without transforming the object considered. The matter of how these
    transformations come about at all is a factor of relationship between the energy
    and information domains, and is beyond the scope of Model-A. Although we will
    discuss this relationship in detail later, for now let us refrain from the
    consideration of phenomenon not defined by Model-A for purposes of clarity.

    In addition to the object traits just discussed, objects also possess traits
    of externality and internality. Their external traits are their means for
    influencing other objects; their internal traits are representative of
    behavioral influences within the objects themselves. Thus there are two
    axes -- statics vs. dynamics and internalities vs. externalities -- by which
    Augusta apprehends object traits, and to each of these she accords a
    corresponding Jungian function. To their internal statics she corresponds
    intuition; to their external statics she corresponds sensation; to their
    external dynamics she corresponds thinking; and to their internal dynamics she
    corresponds feeling. Each of these functions are oriented towards the object,
    they are so extroverted. Therefore for the extroverted function set we have
    extroverted thinking, extroverted feeling, extroverted intuition, and
    extroverted sensation, corresponding to the information elements of the same.

    Augusta postulates that the consideration of fields implies seperation from
    the consideration of objects and the "psychological object", thus corresponding
    the observation of fields to the intra-psychic or "introverted" attitude
    described by Jung. This attitude is so described "subjective" because of the
    contrast between the observed, which is in fact the ethereal, intransigent
    nature of the field, and the observer, who is the equally intransigent witness
    to the field's nature. Whereas the the extrovert lives in the real-world
    physical realm of imminent survival concerns, the introvert lives in a
    meta-physical reality of long-range observations and timeless truths. These
    long-range observations correspond to the dynamics of observed fields, and
    the timeless truths to their statics. For example, none save an introvert
    could discern patterns in the processes of change, or the existence of physical
    laws such as the persistent force of gravity. Each of these concepts are
    traits not of individual objects but of the set of all objects of a given
    kind, and as such may be considered relevant aspects of the "field" of
    considered objects. Like the extrovert, the introvert is keen to the external
    and internal factors of the fields they observe. If a factor of a field is
    apprehended from without, it is an external factor that may be witnessed by
    objects external to the field. If the factor is an internal feature of the
    field, then it is exclusive to the objects that lie within it. The four
    pairings of internal/external and static/dynamic field factors correspond to
    Jung's four functional manifestations of the introverted attitude. To the
    internal dynamics accords intuition; to the external dynamics accords
    sensation; to the external statics accords thinking; and to the internal
    statics corresponds feeling. This gives us introverted thinking, introverted
    feeling, introverted sensation, and introverted intuition for the introverted
    function set.

    Let us now treat the eight elements in greater detail, starting with the
    extroverted set. To remove ambiguity as to whether the eight elements or the
    eight aspects are being considered, we will refer to them as the "eight
    elemental aspects" to denote that what is being considered is the experience
    of the aspects themselves by means of the elements.

    We begin with extroverted intuition.

    EXTROVERTED INTUITION

    Jung describes extroverted intuition as the awareness of possibilities. These
    possibilities, says Jung, are potential events that may happen at any moment.
    Augusta postulates that this awareness has a physical aspect, equating
    extroverted intuition as an information aspect with the internal statics of
    objects, and as an information element with the perception of the same. Augusta
    describes the internal statics of objects as their potential, equivalent to
    the physical concept of potential energy owing to a state of position to act.
    The question as to what potential is existant, then, is a matter of the
    activity the apphrended object is capable of performing. The nature of this
    activity, which we reckon as apphrehensible only by means of a corresponding
    information element, is a question of the exerted element which serves
    extroverted intuition. We will refrain from discussing exertion elements, except
    in brief, during this portion of our discussion as Augusta does not postulate
    their existence. Rather, we shall treat them to their own section later. For
    now we content ourselves that extroverted intuition is the apphrehension of
    potential for activity by an object.

    Through the lense of extroverted intuition, one sees a world that is comprised
    of potentials for activity possessed by various objects. Because this is the
    entirety of extroverted intuition's experience -- the other elements either pay
    an auxiliary role, as is the case for the other elements of the irrational
    class, or no role at all, in the case of the rational class -- the world seems
    populated entirely by objects and their potentials. In the context of such
    a world, it is easy to discern similarities between objects that possess
    potential behaviors. This is the comparative aspect of intuitive experience,
    which we do not reckon as extroverted intuition because it is only indirectly
    relevant to an object's potential for action: observation of potentials does
    not equate to the perception of similarities between them. It may be that the
    comparative aspect is a function in its own right that is reckoned neither by
    information metabolism as Augusta defines it nor exertion as we define it here.
    Perhaps it is a function of intellect itself, or a native (pure) property of
    intuition. We do not discuss it further here, but only acknowledge its role
    in the intuitive experience.


    Note: this is another in my primer series, and is not yet complete. I'll be editing this post with further discussion as I structure my ideas.
    Edit 5/18: described the rationale for exertion theory, and the basis for believing exertion can be described with socionics information elements.
    Edit: 5/22: began describing the psychological object as postulated by Jung.
    Edit: 5/30: completed discussion of Jung's typology. NOTE: I am unclear as to what Jung's understanding of psychic progression was (if any), although I do not say that in the text. It might be more appropriate to consider this description my attempt to bridge Jung to socionics, rather than what Jung really thought. But as I say in the comments below, I am still researching Jung's understanding of typology at this time.
    Edit: 6/10: Removed the Jungian type derivation. Jung did not attempt to order the functions sequentially that I can deduce. (at the very least, he did not explicitly state the situation as such.) Rather, the "loss-cutter" differentiation process I had described here is the road to expressing Jung's typology as an incomplete expression of Model-A, and further the use of Jung's conscious-unconscious compensation dynamic as a proof of Model-A's urobolic/mandalic nature.
    Edit: 6/11: Restored the Jungian type derivation with the most reasonably correct interpretation of his theory I can contrive. Note that this interpretation is in direct contrast with MBTI on the matter of the 3rd function, which is considered socionics 6th function as opposed to 4th. However, the truth may ultimately lie at the midsection of the two extremes. (we will discuss this later.)
    Edit: 6/15: Discussed Jugn's influence on Augusta and Model-A, and explained that Model-A is a more complete description of the processes first apprehended by Jung, effectively recognizing Jung's typology as a subset of Model-A.
    Edit: 6/19: Preliminary discussion of the eight information elements/aspects. ("elemental aspects")
    Edit: 6/20: Described extroverted intuition as an IM element.

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    Now that sounds interesting. I am looking forward to the next installment.

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    And here it is. I hope I've explained it clearly enough. There may be a sort of disconnect at one point. The theoretical bases for this theory are subtle, but they are there. I need your feedback to know that I've explained this in an intelligible manner.

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    My views on the slave type are.. different. I see the slave type rather as an apparatus that gives shape to the atomic parts of a person's view of reality, and the metabolism as the mechanism that builds up a more complex structure from those parts. I see them as running paralel, and supplementing eachother by expanding their network of information, the master by using the brain's faculty of representation to reproduce what the slave type had thus far shown it, and the slave by exploring the physical world itself... 'Understanding' and 'knowledge' in this way not so much consitute a correspondence between thought and reality, but between the worlds of the master and slave type instead.

    I'm interested in your views though. Do you think our differences in outlook, as master type identicals on the same context line, are determined entirely by the way we choose to act on the information we take in, beyond differences of past and environment...? In our two cases I find that difficult to believe, as, no offence, but there are many people whose view of reality I can assimilate with more ease than yours.

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    Quote Originally Posted by labcoat
    My views on the slave type are.. different. I see the slave type rather as an apparatus that gives shape to the atomic parts of a person's view of reality, and the metabolism as the mechanism that builds up a more complex structure from those parts. I see them as running paralel, and supplementing eachother by expanding their network of information, the master by using the brain's faculty of representation to reproduce what the slave type had thus far shown it, and the slave by exploring the physical world itself... 'Understanding' and 'knowledge' in this way not so much consitute a correspondence between thought and reality, but between the worlds of the master and slave type instead.

    I'm interested in your views though. Do you think our differences in outlook, as master type identicals on the same context line, are determined entirely by the way we choose to act on the information we take in, beyond differences of past and environment...? In our two cases I find that difficult to believe, as, no offence, but there are many people whose view of reality I can assimilate with more ease than yours.
    Definitely not. There are other factors; but socionics does not tell us waht they are or give us hints as to what they may be.

    I am very interested in your view. I suggest that you build up your own structure of metabolism-exertion phenomena... people will probably understand your view better than mine.

    the master by using the brain's faculty of representation to reproduce what the slave type had thus far shown it, and the slave by exploring the physical world itself
    I was actually getting to something like this; however, I thought it prudent to explain how we get to the exertion theory from socionics first.

    Your view is definitely more holistic... I see the meaning of the types to individual; you see the meaning of the types to themselves and each other. (ENFp exertion seeing psychology in everything... you should consider the case of an exertion identical of yours, Xenosaga's Wilhelm character. (ISTp-ENFp) Although actress Tilda Swinton is also that type, and so, probably, was Robert Heinlein. (from whom Wilhelm was inspired))

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    I hope I did not raise the impression that your explanation was difficult to understand; I can see very well how you've built up the idea and whan you are getting at. I'm just having difficulty connecting some of it to my own experiences.

    By the way, it may very well be that our explanations can be reconciled despite that they sound dissimilar. Perhaps the way a person acts has a profound effect on what that person considers correct action, and since integrating knowledge (/metabolizing) is often preceeded by action of some kind, the two strongly affect eachother.

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    I didn't read it all, but let me see if I get the basic picture: Master types dictate the priority of information intake, while Slave types dictate the priority of information exertion? That's actually an interesting idea, that the two could be different. However, Socionics, in its essence, is saying that the two are the same by defining two types as one another's duals. Are you saying that the nature of duality is just an idealistic interpretation of how information exchange occurs between two people? That would broaden the gap of potential human miscommunication to incalculable levels.
    But, for a certainty, back then,
    We loved so many, yet hated so much,
    We hurt others and were hurt ourselves...

    Yet even then, we ran like the wind,
    Whilst our laughter echoed,
    Under cerulean skies...

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    Quote Originally Posted by GillySaysGoodbye
    I didn't read it all, but let me see if I get the basic picture: Master types dictate the priority of information intake, while Slave types dictate the priority of information exertion?
    That's the idea precisely.

    That's actually an interesting idea, that the two could be different. However, Socionics, in its essence, is saying that the two are the same by defining two types as one another's duals. Are you saying that the nature of duality is just an idealistic interpretation of how information exchange occurs between two people? That would broaden the gap of potential human miscommunication to incalculable levels.
    I don't think socionics says anything about this. How did you come upon this belief? I should note that we are talking about two types within the same person, one managing intake and the other the conduction of output. This has nothing (directly) to do with the concept of duality. Duality is a perception; we're talking about perception and exertion both.

    However, you are correct in that exertions can conflict. You can, for example, possess a relationship with a "dual-conflictor" who assists you psychologically but undermines your activities and interests. (does this make sense, labcoat? I've really not thought this relationship through yet.)

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    Then I agree 100% with the idea of exertion types. My mother would be an ideal example of an LSE-LIE, and my dad probably an EII-EIE. I could see myself as an ILE with an Fe dominant exertion type, most likely EIE.

    Do you think exertion types can change? I feel like this would make it fit VERY well with Smilex's theories about types being based on goals and personal mottos.
    But, for a certainty, back then,
    We loved so many, yet hated so much,
    We hurt others and were hurt ourselves...

    Yet even then, we ran like the wind,
    Whilst our laughter echoed,
    Under cerulean skies...

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    Quote Originally Posted by GillySaysGoodbye
    Then I agree 100% with the idea of exertion types. My mother would be an ideal example of an LSE-LIE, and my dad probably an EII-EIE. I could see myself as an ILE with an Fe dominant exertion type, most likely EIE.

    Do you think exertion types can change? I feel like this would make it fit VERY well with Smilex's theories about types being based on goals and personal mottos.
    Yes but... cannot goals be innate as well? I'm open to the question of whether an exertion type can change... however it seems unlikely because there are extremely solid VI correspondences between similar IM-IE type combinations. It would seem to me these correspondences need a reasonable explanation.

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    Doing a little more thinking, I think my IE type is probably more likely IEE, if there is one. My lifelong goals have been to offer protection or assistance to people who have nobody else on their side (Fi, Aristocracy) and to have enough money to simply not have to worry about finances (EP, Se role). My goals are always impeded by objective self-psychoanalysis(Ti PoLR) and unhealthy desires for more money than I need and attempts to gain power over others (Se role). Currently, these desires take shape in wanting to be a defense attorney and, once I'm financially secure, a public defender.
    But, for a certainty, back then,
    We loved so many, yet hated so much,
    We hurt others and were hurt ourselves...

    Yet even then, we ran like the wind,
    Whilst our laughter echoed,
    Under cerulean skies...

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    Quote Originally Posted by GillySaysGoodbye
    Doing a little more thinking, I think my IE type is probably more likely IEE, if there is one. My lifelong goals have been to offer protection or assistance to people who have nobody else on their side (Fi, Aristocracy) and to have enough money to simply not have to worry about finances (EP, Se role). My goals are always impeded by objective self-psychoanalysis(Ti PoLR) and unhealthy desires for more money than I need and attempts to gain power over others (Se role). Currently, these desires take shape in wanting to be a defense attorney and, once I'm financially secure, a public defender.
    Good goals. It is worth discussing (informally) what the exertion types mean to the world one perceives.

    If you are an ENFp exertion type, then everything you perceive appears to have a psychological element. Let's look at an example, labcoat (INTj-ENFp). labcoat begins Model-A progression at , analyzing the structure of the instances before him. When a person talks to labcoat, they speak of possibilities () and how they feel about them (). That is the experience of ENFp exertion. labcoat himself puts forward the structure of the world as he sees it at that moment. Given that structure, he produces possibilities. Let's bring up the analogy of the sun, again. with exertion says that the immediate perception of the sun creates the potential for blindness given the possibility that one looks at it. Obviously not very appealing. wouldn't even bother to ask what the sun is made of: the sun is obviously present and recognized by all who can see it. The very existence of the sun, meanwhile, implies the possibility it will be seen. The witness of this sun, which has observed to exist at this instant, can cause feelings of pain. The possibility of pain suggests that a person will feel apprehensive about the witness of the sun indefinitely. This is itself an important aspect of the relationship of the person to the sun from a psychological PoV.

    In the case of ENTp-ENFp, one would observe the sun as capable of producing heat and light. ( internal object statics of the sun) This would put forward the possibilities of being burned, or being blinded. Creative concludes that one will look away from the sun or seek protection against it, whereas exertion observes this conclusion to be indefinite in nature given the persistence of the sun's internal field statics and the attendent possibilities created by those characteristics. Together, and produce the statement that "one will always seek shelter against the sun." Thus shelter for the sun can be perceived as a psychological motivator.

    In contrast, an ENTp-ENFj would observe the sun to be capable of producing heat and light, creating for themselves the subjective experience of living with this possibility. The experience of this possibility creates the need for a structured response that can progressively provide better and better shelter from the sun. ()

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    ...So the conclusion of looking away from the sun being a "good idea" is invalidated, or at least temporarily suspended, by the fact that the sun keeps shining and producing heat, and that good things can come of this? Is Ti concluding that the sun shining and producing heat is a "bad" thing because of the potential effects on the observer, and implying that it should not exist as such because of this? Would the Fi be implying that this isn't necessarily true because of the good things that come from the sun? That makes no sense. Although I did stare at the sun as a kid
    But, for a certainty, back then,
    We loved so many, yet hated so much,
    We hurt others and were hurt ourselves...

    Yet even then, we ran like the wind,
    Whilst our laughter echoed,
    Under cerulean skies...

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    Quote Originally Posted by GillySaysGoodbye
    ...So the conclusion of looking away from the sun being a "good idea" is invalidated, or at least temporarily suspended, by the fact that the sun keeps shining and producing heat, and that good things can come of this? Is Ti concluding that the sun shining and producing heat is a "bad" thing because of the potential effects on the observer, and implying that it should not exist as such because of this? Would the Fi be implying that this isn't necessarily true because of the good things that come from the sun? That makes no sense. Although I did stare at the sun as a kid
    Well that was an example of a thought process at work. I never said the "good idea" was invalidated at any time. What was concluded was a simple psychological truth, that people will be motivated to look away from the sun.

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    Ok, I see. The Fi says that people won't ALWAYS look away from the sun.
    But, for a certainty, back then,
    We loved so many, yet hated so much,
    We hurt others and were hurt ourselves...

    Yet even then, we ran like the wind,
    Whilst our laughter echoed,
    Under cerulean skies...

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    Quote Originally Posted by GillySaysGoodbye
    Ok, I see. The Fi says that people won't ALWAYS look away from the sun.
    No, it says they will. That's what makes them predictable: they will always look away from the sun because their conclusions will be the same, because their conditions will be the same. Their decision to look away from the sun is an judgement that will persist.

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    If you are an ENFp exertion type, then everything you perceive appears to have a psychological element. Let's look at an example, labcoat (INTj-ENFp). labcoat begins Model-A progression at Introverted Thinking, analyzing the structure of the Extraverted Intution instances before him. When a person talks to labcoat, they speak of possibilities (Extraverted Intution) and how they feel about them (Introverted Feeling). That is the experience of ENFp exertion. labcoat himself puts forward the structure of the world as he sees it at that moment. Given that structure, he produces Extraverted Intution possibilities. Let's bring up the analogy of the sun, again. Introverted Thinking with Extraverted Intution exertion says that the immediate perception of the sun creates the potential for blindness given the possibility that one looks at it. Obviously not very appealing. Introverted Thinking wouldn't even bother to ask what the sun is made of: the sun is obviously present and recognized by all who can see it. The very existence of the sun, meanwhile, implies the possibility it will be seen. The witness of this sun, which Introverted Thinking has observed to exist at this instant, can cause feelings of pain. The possibility of pain suggests that a person will feel apprehensive about the witness of the sun indefinitely. This is itself an important aspect of the relationship of the person to the sun from a psychological PoV.
    Not bad at all, I agree with most of this.

    I think of Ne more as a building block of an Si sensation-gestalt; possibilities being generated by linking an Ne 'asbstract' taken from an Si gestalt that was directly taken in, to another Si gestalt (which could be built from isolate Ne blocks entirely).

    What I am still trying to understand at this point, is how Ne perception-objects line up to form complete gestalts; I gather that their arrangment must somehow be important.

    Also it should be noted that exertion Fi does not make you interested in peoples' 'intentional' (context driven?) feelings, but rather in the objective cq. inherent feeling qualities/associations of an Ne or Se perception-object. In my case it is a very cold, analytical and often cynical evaluation of feelings, and of their existence rather than of their pertinence to specific situations.

    Not being bother by what the sun 'is' beyond it's psychological significance is something I expect every exertion ENFp to identify with, yes. I think very few of us are really interested in subjects like physics or analytical philosophy; both of those are just too far removed from anything valuable from the purely ethical standpoint.

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    Quote Originally Posted by labcoat
    and of their [feelings] existence rather than of their pertinence to specific situations.
    This is Fe.
    But, for a certainty, back then,
    We loved so many, yet hated so much,
    We hurt others and were hurt ourselves...

    Yet even then, we ran like the wind,
    Whilst our laughter echoed,
    Under cerulean skies...

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    No, it isn't. (at least, not conscious )

    Imagine observing a possibility and paying specific attention to yours and other's internal feelings in the context of that possibility. That is exertion in the context of metabolized . Alternately, one might observe the aspects of the possibility that do not change, because those are internal field statics also.

    Compare it to Einstein's ability to perceive the conclusions a person would draw given a possible scenario, which is exertion in the service of . It is worth noting, however, that labcoat's metabolism with exertion perceives on the one hand the positive feelings of the created possibility, and on the other hand the negative possibility suggested by . I perceive something similar: although I have created for myself what I think will be an ideal concept of event progression, I tend to be caught off guard by the flip-side of what that possibility allows to happen. Doomsday scenarios, for example, are imminently apparent.

    (I apologize for the confusion over the expression of ; I had forgotten (disregarded?) my original conclusions, thinking that "in the context of" was an inferior descriptor for the concept of exertion. But really, it's just another way of looking at it. Exertion is a very complex phenomenon.)

    I would recommend looking at an exerted function not as an element in itself, but rather is an "element within another element". For example, metabolism with exertion would be capable of asserting the range of possible happenings at a moment in time. This makes sense if you consider that is a function of memory, and that we remember some things more easily than others.

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    I see. So if the feelings are independant of the context (which changes), they are static, and static ethics = . Right?

    So if I was exertion , I would be good at predicting peoples' real, personal reactions in a possible situation (despite what they might say in a given context () )? Doesn't this basically mean I'm good at seeing through people?

    What else can I tell you that would help me figure out my exertion type?
    But, for a certainty, back then,
    We loved so many, yet hated so much,
    We hurt others and were hurt ourselves...

    Yet even then, we ran like the wind,
    Whilst our laughter echoed,
    Under cerulean skies...

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    So if I was exertion , I would be good at predicting peoples' real, personal reactions in a possible situation (despite what they might say in a given context)? Doesn't this basically mean I'm good at seeing through people?
    Yes, that's correct. At every point in your metabolic process, you are paying attention to a specific element of your situation over the other seven. Actually you only need to identify what the first two functions of your exertion type are, and then you can plot out your entire exertion type by following the type construction rules. You need to answer two questions about yourself: 1) what is the content of the possibilities you consider (e.g., what is happening (), being felt or remaining constant (), being decided (), progressing (), interrelating (), being exchanged (), being realized (), being shared ()), and 2) what are you attempting to structure ( motion, progression, interrelation, exchange paths, feelings, possibilities of manifestation, shared experiences, or another structure)

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    Then I am either or exertion. What would help me decide between these two? Talk to me more about what "progressing" and "interrelating" mean to you.
    But, for a certainty, back then,
    We loved so many, yet hated so much,
    We hurt others and were hurt ourselves...

    Yet even then, we ran like the wind,
    Whilst our laughter echoed,
    Under cerulean skies...

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    In the context of metabolized :

    - possible relationships between groups, the ability to perceive the harmony offered by a possibility, the healing action offered by a possibility, artistic details of an imagined scenario or setting.

    - sequences of event that could begin at any given moment. (for example, the Books of Revelation or of Daniel, a final peace process between Israel and Palestine, or of a phased U.S. withdraw from Iraq.)

    Let's consider how these would manifest in the case of ILE. (although I prefer to use the MBTI nomenclature for the discussion of exertion because ILE-LIE sounds like a tongue twister.) For convenience, let's refer back to the issue of the perception of the sun.

    with might perceive the sun as offering the possibility of sunburn. It might alternately perceive the sun as offering melanin. If you go outside and experience contact with the sun's rays, you may get burned if you stay out too long. Alternately, you may get tanned if you avoid over exposng yourself. If the creative exertion function is , you may be perceived as variously attractive or unattractive depending on whether or not you allow yourself to tan or to burn. If , you may believe that the factor of a burn or tan has conseqeunces to your ability to relate to others, and others may reciprocate.

    with might perceive the sun as offering the capacity for growth, or for an enjoyable sequence of activities throughout one's day. One can speculate that should the sun go supernova, life on earth would prove doomed within a matter of hours. For example, if the sun should offer an enjoyable progression of the day's events, then one would conclude that one should go out and enjoy these events. Alternately, if the sun offers a promise of total annihilation, one would conclude that the world is at an end. In the former case, creative exertion offers a pleasant experience of the world. In the latter case, recommends hopelessness and dispair. would offer outreach to friends and family in the former case, in the latter perhaps contact with a self-help group or doomsday cult.

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    Then I'd be ILE-IEI.
    But, for a certainty, back then,
    We loved so many, yet hated so much,
    We hurt others and were hurt ourselves...

    Yet even then, we ran like the wind,
    Whilst our laughter echoed,
    Under cerulean skies...

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    I think I can see that in your writing, now that you mention it. What do you think, labcoat? (I am using at for this purpose, after all.)

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    I'm studying Jung in more depth now, with plans to check out several volumes of his Collected Works in a few days. (they are at the main university campus, which will send them to the community college library I use to post here.)

    I will be sure to share my findings here, with excerpts. In particular, I want to identify the concepts which formed "Model-J" to the extent it was deemed applicable to personality testing, especially the matter of function order. ("Psychological Types" does not discuss this matter in full, the roles of the second and third function in particular.)

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    Well I have determined this: that Jung's notion of unconscious compensation directly corresponds to socionics dual-seeking IN SOME CASES. Jung used the term, "unconscious" for many different things.

    My comments are in square brackets.


    "No one will maintain that the atomic physicists are a pack of criminals because it is to their efforts that we owe that peculiar flower of human ingenuity, the hydrogen bomb. The vast amount of intellectual work that went into the development of nuclear physics was put forth by men who devoted themselves to their task with the greatest exertions and self-sacrifice and whose moral acheivement could just as easily have earned them the merit of inventing something useful and beneficial to humanity. But even though the first step along the road to a momentous invention may be the outcome of a conscious decision, here, as everywhere, the spontaneous idea -- the hunch or intuition -- plays and important part. In other words, the unconscious collaborates too and often makes decisive contributions. So it is not the conscious effort alone that is responsible for the result; somewhere or other the unconscious, with its barely discernable goals and intentions, has its finger in the pie. If it puts a weapon in your hand, it is aiming at some kind of violence. Knowledge of the truth is the foremost goal of science, and if in pursuit of the longing for light we stumble upon an immense danger, then one has the impression more of fatality than of premeditation."

    "A human relationship is not based on differentiation and perfection, for these only emphasize the differences or call forth the exact opposite; it is based, rather, on imperfection, on what is weak, helpless and in need of support -- the very ground and motive of dependence. The perfect has no need of the other, but weakness has, for it seeks support and does not confront its partner with anything that might force him into an inferior position and even humiliate him. "

    "The question of human relationship and of the inner cohesion of our society is an urgent one in view of the atomization of the pent-up mass man, whose personal relationships are undermined by general mistrust." [Jung contrasts a weak intuition of the socion, which transcends national boundaries, with the "mass man" who, he says, has lost sight of himself in a world of consumerism. The nation, says Jung, undermines the pursuit of a more perfect union. (which could be equated to a socion-aware world)]"

    - The Undiscovered Self

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    from toronto with love ScarlettLux's Avatar
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    Layman's terms, LAYMAN'S TERMS!!!


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    somewhere or other the unconscious, with its barely discernable goals and intentions, has its finger in the pie.
    Jung's unconscious -- or inferior -- function corresponds to socionics' 5th function. (not the 4th function as I mistakenly suggested above)

    The 5th function influences the 1st, right? That's what Jung means here.

    The 5th function leads into the 6th. It is from the 6th function that we draw our respective ideas as to the meaning of "life, the universe, and everything."

    Knowledge of the truth is the foremost goal of science, and if in pursuit of the longing for light we stumble upon an immense danger, then one has the impression more of fatality than of premeditation."
    Jung's type is particularly relevant to that statement: ENFp desires above all knowledge due to 6th function . Naturally they project this desire onto their perception of others' desires, and thus come to say that "knowledge is the absolute end all, be all of everything." No wonder Jung applauded Adam and Eve for partaking of the fruit of the Tree of Knowledge. It would seem further, that ENFps in particular would look favorably upon the acquisition of knowledge at any price. (although does not mean knowledge alone; it also means communication or the ability to communicate effectively.)

    Was Eve an ENFp? Or an ESFp?

    is often correlated with light because the photon is a medium of communication.

    "The question of human relationship and of the inner cohesion of our society is an urgent one in view of the atomization of the pent-up mass man, whose personal relationships are undermined by general mistrust."
    Here Jung is saying that what Augusta would call the socion needs to be understood as soon as possible, because its use minimizes distrust of others by providing a capacity to "know" a person and their intentions very quickly. In a socionics-aware world there is little opporunity for successful deceit.

    A human relationship is not based on differentiation and perfection, for these only emphasize the differences or call forth the exact opposite; it is based, rather, on imperfection, on what is weak, helpless and in need of support -- the very ground and motive of dependence. The perfect has no need of the other, but weakness has, for it seeks support and does not confront its partner with anything that might force him into an inferior position and even humiliate him.
    Above, Jung first observes the existence of the conflictor relation (intuitively), and second the existence of and need for duality. He only observes their existence, and not their actual structure.

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    I've reached a conclusion: Jung had no concept of procedural function order. He only numbered them, he did not order them at all. The concept of function order probably advented with Kempinsky. (obviously one needs a process for metabolism to take place) I'll have to redo that last paragraph.

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    Ti centric krieger's Avatar
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    It's news to me that he numbered them at all... I've never read any of that in Psychological Types. Which of his works does he do that in?

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    Quote Originally Posted by labcoat
    It's news to me that he numbered them at all... I've never read any of that in Psychological Types. Which of his works does he do that in?
    Auxiliary/secondary, tertiary/third, inferior/fourth. Remember Jung called the inferior "the fourth". (Satan as the fourth function of the Godhead, for example) Also notable: eight functions doesn't fit as well into his "mandala" view of psychic wholeness. So to say, his view of totally and Self constrained his thinking....

    "Most people have one function, a few have two or three, individuated personality has four functions..." - that's from the Jung lexicon.

    He talks about the 1st, 2nd, and inferior functions in Psychological Types. ( vs , for example, pairings with an auxiliary) But he never, ever suggested a process. That's the biggest difference between MBTI/Jung-based typologies and socionics cyberneticism. Jung also failed to distinguish between "functions" and "function-attitude pairings" (function types) at crucial points in his discussion of the types, leading to several different interpretations of his typology. MBTI proponents tend to perceive Jung as describing the use of functions as a matter of choice. It has led to the "development" myth and further, the myth of conscious "choice" as regards function use.

    I've found further books on Jung. I'll share what I learn from them.

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    Dream Symbolism in Relation to Alchemy p.371
    11. DREAM:
    The dreamer, the doctor, a pilot and the unkown woman are travelling by airplane. A croquet ball suddenly smashes the mirror, an indispensable instrument of navigation, and the airplane crashes to the ground. Here again there is the same doubt: to whom does the unknown woman belong?

    Here again the dreamer and the three dream figures form a quaternity. The unknown woman or anima always represents the "inferior," i.e., the undifferentiated function, which in the case of our dreamer is feeling. The croquet ball is connected with the "round" motif and is therefore a symbol of wholeness, that is, of the self, here shown to be hostile to the intellect (the mirror). Evidently the dreamer "navigates" too much by the intellect and thus upsets the process of individuation.
    Notice that the feeling is discussed without reference to attitude.

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    I revised the description of Jung's typology. Next is an in-depth discussion of Model-A and its relationship to Jung's psychology, followed by an analysis of exetion's relevance to our experience of Model-A.

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    Presented Jung's typology as a precursor of Model-A that describes the same phenomenon as that described by Model-A, but in less detail. Also presented the relevance of Model-A to the kinds of arguments a person is likely to pose in a given situation.

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    Described as the perception of potential ranges of activity by an object.

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    from toronto with love ScarlettLux's Avatar
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    Well tcaud.. tell me I'm ESFp exertion type. I think it makes perfect sense.


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    Quote Originally Posted by ScarlettLux
    Well tcaud.. tell me I'm ESFp exertion type. I think it makes perfect sense.
    Yes I think I agree. You do VI quite well with Audry Hepburn, even though you are a different race.

    And with exertion typing we have a wide enough type range to correlate VI with type at a very high degree of accuracy.

    Here's something interesting: if UDP is INTj-ESTj as he and I believe, then doesn't that mean your relationship with him is one of "perfect" beneficiary/benefit?

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    from toronto with love ScarlettLux's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tcaudilllg
    Quote Originally Posted by ScarlettLux
    Well tcaud.. tell me I'm ESFp exertion type. I think it makes perfect sense.
    Yes I think I agree. You do VI quite well with Audry Hepburn, even though you are a different race.

    And with exertion typing we have a wide enough type range to correlate VI with type at a very high degree of accuracy.

    Here's something interesting: if UDP is INTj-ESTj as he and I believe, then doesn't that mean your relationship with him is one of "perfect" beneficiary/benefit?
    Hahaha... you really think Audrey is an INFp-ESFp? After that video of her in Beta Videos thread.. she seems INFj.. bleh. I didn't feel any inkling of connection with her.

    What is so interesting about that? Is our interaction very telling of this "perfect" Beneficiary/Benefit thing? And how so..?


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    Quote Originally Posted by ScarlettLux
    Quote Originally Posted by tcaudilllg
    Quote Originally Posted by ScarlettLux
    Well tcaud.. tell me I'm ESFp exertion type. I think it makes perfect sense.
    Yes I think I agree. You do VI quite well with Audry Hepburn, even though you are a different race.

    And with exertion typing we have a wide enough type range to correlate VI with type at a very high degree of accuracy.

    Here's something interesting: if UDP is INTj-ESTj as he and I believe, then doesn't that mean your relationship with him is one of "perfect" beneficiary/benefit?
    Hahaha... you really think Audrey is an INFp-ESFp? After that video of her in Beta Videos thread.. she seems INFj.. bleh. I didn't feel any inkling of connection with her.

    What is so interesting about that? Is our interaction very telling of this "perfect" Beneficiary/Benefit thing? And how so..?
    I've seen very little such interaction between you two on this forum. What I am saying is, in your case your relations with UDP should flow exactly like Augusta describes, with no deviations. (although, we have no access to her original descriptions, do we?) Consider, if you were an INFj exertion type, then although you would not perceive UDP as being capable of assisting you personally, you would find it easy and preferable to collaborate with him on mutual goals because your work styles are complementary. You would also be capable of understanding his "angle" on a situation easily. As it is, you are his perfect benefactor, a sort of super-guardian angel that leads him toward "the path" and gives him everything he needs to get there.

    Audry is INFp-ESFp, I'm quite certain of that. But she may be on a different wavelength than you psychic domain-wise.

    Here's something interesting: I am your exertion benefactor! Through my work I give you something only I can give, and in the giving I can feel fulfilled and worthwhile.

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