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Thread: The Fundamental Nature of MBTI

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    machintruc's Avatar
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    Default The Fundamental Nature of MBTI

    I don't really understand that article, but it seems interesting...

    http://player2000gi.alotspace.com/jungian_functions.htm
    Last edited by silke; 02-19-2014 at 05:49 AM. Reason: fixed article link

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    Yes, that is an interesting article that I read a couple of years ago. You should notice that it describes introverted thinking (Ti) as a right brain function, and introverted intuition (Ni) as a left brain function. The main reason for that claim is that in MBTT Ti is described as "holistic" and non-linear, and that is linked with having irrational (P) behaviour. INTPs are like that, and they are supposed to have Ti as leading function (that is the false assumption they make). In Socionics we would expect the opposite to be true: that Ni is a right brain function and Ti a left brain function, because it is the thinking of an INTp that is holistic and non-linear, whereas INTjs think more like Ni is described in that article.

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    In smilexian socionics, all introvert functions are considered to operate 'wholistically'.

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    Quote Originally Posted by labcoat
    In smilexian socionics, all introvert functions are considered to operate 'wholistically'.
    But what does it mean in this context? How would you describe your own thinking process, labcoat?

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    Ti centric krieger's Avatar
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    My thought is definitely wholisitic. The difference between me and you though is that for me wholistic evaluation is a means of reaching conclusions, whereas for you it is a method of exploration.

    Your introvert function tells you what direction to go in. Mine tells me wether I'm there or not.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Phaedrus
    Yes, that is an interesting article that I read a couple of years ago. You should notice that it describes introverted thinking (Ti) as a right brain function, and introverted intuition (Ni) as a left brain function. The main reason for that claim is that in MBTT Ti is described as "holistic" and non-linear, and that is linked with having irrational (P) behaviour. INTPs are like that, and they are supposed to have Ti as leading function (that is the false assumption they make). In Socionics we would expect the opposite to be true: that Ni is a right brain function and Ti a left brain function, because it is the thinking of an INTp that is holistic and non-linear, whereas INTjs think more like Ni is described in that article.
    I'm inclined to disagree. Sort of.

    The correct definition of J and P for MBTT users is dynamic and static, not rational and irrational. That is, if you're going to criticize them for not properly typing people, it should be with that definition in mind, because that's the only one they claim to use. As an LII I should always test INTP. If sometimes I test INTJ, it's a problem. I should test the same as other statics, such as ENTP, ESFP, and ISTP.

    The issue is how to tell apart rationality and staticity. Rationals are primarily concerned with making intentional decisions, irrationals are primarily concerned with making neutral observations. Statics are people who try to make simpler observations and more involved decisions. Dynamics make more involved observations and simpler decisions.

    If you ask me questions that indicate whether I focus more on decision-making or observation-making, it'll produce an answer indicating rationality. If you ask me whether I prefer to finalize my decisions quickly, or keep them open-ended for a long time, the answer will indicate staticity. The confusing thing for test-makers is that extroverts will answer the same on both questions, but introverts will answer the opposite.

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