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Thread: Queen Elizabeth I

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    Default Queen Elizabeth I



    Queen Elizabeth I of England (and Ireland), born in 1533, coronation in 1559, died in 1603. She was the last monarch of the Tudor dynasty, and did not produce any heirs.

    Elizabeth's reign is known as the Elizabethan era. The period is famous for the flourishing of English drama, led by playwrights such as William Shakespeare and Christopher Marlowe, and for the seafaring prowess of English adventurers such as Francis Drake. Some historians depict Elizabeth as a short-tempered, sometimes indecisive ruler, who enjoyed more than her share of luck. Towards the end of her reign, a series of economic and military problems weakened her popularity. Elizabeth is acknowledged as a charismatic performer and a dogged survivor in an era when government was ramshackle and limited, and when monarchs in neighbouring countries faced internal problems that jeopardised their thrones.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elizabeth_I_of_England

    Elizabeth’s character was something of a mystery to most people in 1558. She had learned early on to keep her own counsel, control her emotions, and to behave circumspectly in public, thus giving the lie to any adverse rumours about her. [...] Always dignified and stately in her bearing, she could also be vain, willful, dictatorial, temperamental and imperious. Her sense of humour sometimes had a malicious edge to it, and she was capable of making sharp, cutting remarks, yet she could be warm and compassionate when occasion demanded, particularly towards the old and the sick, the bereaved and those who had suffered misfortune. She had courage, both in her convictions and in the face of danger, and was not above metaphorically thumbing her nose at her enemies. Possessing an innate humanity, she was not normally cruel – unlike most rulers of her day – and many regarded her as being unusually tolerant in that age of religious dogmatism. She saw herself as a paragon of ‘honour and honesty’ who dealt with others in a straightforward manner and would stand by ‘the word of a prince’, but the reality was somewhat different. She could prevaricate, dissemble and deceive as well as any other ruler of her time. The need constantly to economise had made her so careful with money as to appear parsimonious, and to the end of her life she would avoid spending it if she could. Caution was her watchword in all her dealings: she took no more risks than she had to. She had learned in a hard school.
    [Elizabeth] had a formidable intelligence, an acute mind and a remarkably good memory. Ascham declared he had never known a woman with a quicker apprehension or a more retentive memory. Her mind, he enthused, was seemingly free from all female weakness, and she was ‘endued with a masculine power of application’; he delighted in the fact that she could discourse intelligently on any intellectual subject.
    Elizabeth’s physical health was robust, and she had boundless energy, but her troubled adolescence had made her neurotic and she suffered intermittent panic attacks, irrational fears and bouts of emotional paralysis, when she was incapable of knowing what to do. She could not tolerate loud noises, although she had a quick temper and was not above shouting and swearing at her hapless advisers.
    The Queen was an exacting and demanding mistress who expected high standards to prevail in her household. She disliked employing anyone who was ugly, and once turned down an application for a position from a man whose handsome face was marred by a missing tooth.
    There is no doubt that [Elizabeth] found it an advantage being a young, marriageable female in a court of men: flirtation was her life blood, and she was well aware that her attraction for men was not entirely due to her exalted status. Like her mother, she knew how to charm the opposite sex into thinking her beautiful by her wit and vivacity, her lively conversation and her expressive eyes. Her personality was compelling and charismatic: she was, as one courtier claimed, at once ‘so effervescent, so intimate and so regal’.
    [Elizabeth] had also learned to use her femininity to advantage, artfully stressing her womanly weaknesses and shortcomings, even indulging in effective storms of weeping, whilst at the same time displaying many of the qualities most admired in men. She had wisdom, common-sense, staying power, integrity and tenacity, which, along with the ability to compromise, a hard-headed sense of realism, and a devious, subtle brain, would make her a monarch worthy of respect. Men might despise her sex, and they might mistake her finely-calculated sense of timing for dithering, but they learned to appreciate her abilities, even if they did not always understand how her mind worked, her unpredictability, her tendency to unconventional behaviour, and – above all – her ability to change her mind far more than they deemed necessary, or put off making decisions for what seemed an inordinate length of time.
    Sir John Hayward wrote: If ever any person had either the gift or the style to win the hearts of the people, it was this Queen. All her faculties were in motion, and every motion seemed a well-guided action; her eye was set upon one, her ear listened to another, her judgement ran upon a third, to a fourth she addressed her speech; her spirit seemed to be everywhere. Some she pitied, some she commended, some she thanked, at others she pleasantly and wittily jested, condemning no person, neglecting no office, and distributing her smiles, looks and graces so artfully that thereupon the people again redoubled the testimony of their joys, and afterwards, raising everything to the highest strain, filled the ears of all men with immoderate extolling of their prince.
    (quotes from The Life of Elizabeth I by Alison Weir)
    Last edited by hag; 03-02-2019 at 05:13 PM.
    "hag is the elizabeth bathory of t16t" – Luminous Lynx

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    Default Elizabeth: The Virgin Queen


     
    "hag is the elizabeth bathory of t16t" – Luminous Lynx

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    Kids Turned Out Fine Chae's Avatar
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    Coool, you provided awesome information. Interesting woman. I type her Beta rational, tritype 835 or 385, 135 if I'm wrong about 8.

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    Definitely an xIE type.

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    LIE

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    Gamma rational.

    Once you give gamma a power and they'll keep it. Betas are the ones who look for it.
    Sol mb F type due to his inability to think alternatives.


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    Well Henry the 8 was SEE and she had to be 1/3rd likely a Benefit of either SEE or his wife at the time. SEE final

    She is certainly SEE

    he could also be vain, willful, dictatorial, temperamental and imperious.
    -
    Dual type (as per tcaudilllg)
    Enneagram 2w1sw(1w9) helps others to live up to their own standards of what a good person is and is very behind the scenes in the process.
    Tritype 1-2-6 stacking sp/sx


    I'm constantly looking to align the real with the ideal.I've been more oriented toward being overly idealistic by expecting the real to match the ideal. My thinking side is dominent. The result is that sometimes I can be overly impersonal or self-centered in my approach, not being understanding of others in the process and simply thinking "you should do this" or "everyone should follor this rule"..."regardless of how they feel or where they're coming from"which just isn't a good attitude to have. It is a way, though, to give oneself an artificial sense of self-justification. LSE

    Best description of functions:
    http://socionicsstudy.blogspot.com/2...functions.html

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    aka He Died With a Felafel Delilah's Avatar
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    @Vespertine : I am mighty surprised by this " She disliked employing anyone who was ugly, and once turned down an application for a position from a man whose handsome face was marred by a missing tooth." lol

    Need some more info so let us know as you progress along in the biography. Is it interesting?
    "Inasmuch as it is nothing but pure communicability, every face, even the most noble and beautiful, is always suspended on the edge of an abyss"

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    Humanist Beautiful sky's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Delilah View Post
    @Vespertine : I am mighty surprised by this " She disliked employing anyone who was ugly, and once turned down an application for a position from a man whose handsome face was marred by a missing tooth." lol

    Need some more info so let us know as you progress along in the biography. Is it interesting?
    vain right?
    -
    Dual type (as per tcaudilllg)
    Enneagram 2w1sw(1w9) helps others to live up to their own standards of what a good person is and is very behind the scenes in the process.
    Tritype 1-2-6 stacking sp/sx


    I'm constantly looking to align the real with the ideal.I've been more oriented toward being overly idealistic by expecting the real to match the ideal. My thinking side is dominent. The result is that sometimes I can be overly impersonal or self-centered in my approach, not being understanding of others in the process and simply thinking "you should do this" or "everyone should follor this rule"..."regardless of how they feel or where they're coming from"which just isn't a good attitude to have. It is a way, though, to give oneself an artificial sense of self-justification. LSE

    Best description of functions:
    http://socionicsstudy.blogspot.com/2...functions.html

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    The petition reminded Elizabeth that it would be better for her ‘and her kingdom if she would take a consort who might relieve her of those labours which are only fit for men’, and the Speaker, Sir Thomas Gargrave, kneeling, candidly reminded her that, while princes are mortal, commonwealths are immortal. If she remained ‘unmarried and, as it were, a vestal virgin’, such a thing would be ‘contrary to the public respects’.

    When she heard his words, the Queen was plainly astonished at his boldness in broaching such a delicate issue, but she recovered herself and responded graciously, saying, ‘In a matter most unpleasing, pleasing to me is the apparent goodwill of you and my people.’ She stated that she had chosen to stay single despite being offered marriage by ‘most potent princes’, and that she considered she already had a husband and children. Showing them her coronation ring, she declared, as she was to do on many subsequent occasions: ‘I am already bound unto a husband, which is the kingdom of England.’ As for children, ‘Every one of you, and as many as are Englishmen, are children and kinsmen to me.’ She was gratified that the deputation had not named any potential husband, ‘For that were most unbeseeming the majesty of an absolute princess, and unbeseeming your wisdom, who are subjects born.’ [...] Concluding, she declared: ‘In the end, this shall be for me sufficient, that a marble stone shall declare that a queen, having reigned such a time, lived and died a virgin.’ Thus was born the legend of the Virgin Queen, upon which Elizabeth would capitalise to full advantage, and which would achieve cult status in the years to come.
    Privately, she was inclined towards a single existence. In 1559, she confided to a German envoy that ‘she had found the celibate life so agreeable, and was so accustomed to it that she would rather go into a nunnery, or for that matter suffer death’, than be forced to renounce it. The Imperial ambassador was informed by her that she would much prefer to be a ‘beggarwoman and single, far rather than a queen and married’. [...] She seems to have regarded marriage as a refuge for those who could not contain their lust: in 1576, she told Parliament that she held nothing against matrimony, nor would she ‘judge amiss of such as, forced by necessity, cannot dispose themselves to another life’. She herself was determined not to give in to such fleshly weakness.
    Many people believed, and some still do, that because Elizabeth loved courtship and flirtation she was sexually immoral, but in fact she lived a very circumscribed life – she was hardly ever alone, being (as she said herself) ‘always surrounded by my Ladies of the Bedchamber and maids of honour’, who slept in her room – and she valued herself and her honour highly: it would have been unthinkable for the Queen of England to become some man’s plaything. ‘My life is in the open, and I have so many witnesses,’ she once said, having learned what was being said about her abroad. ‘I cannot understand how so bad a judgement can have been formed of me.’ She had, moreover, learned what happened to queens – and, for that matter, princesses – who were suspected of overstepping the bounds of morality, and it had been a grim lesson. Besides, while she remained unattainable, she remained in control of her relationships, and that was how she liked things to be.
    .
    Last edited by hag; 03-02-2019 at 05:14 PM.

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    aka He Died With a Felafel Delilah's Avatar
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    So far she gives off the impressions Se and Fe imo; to be constantly surrounded by others in ways as to also indicate an alibi of sorts (last paragraph) seems leaning extrovert (?) EIE is not a bad typing for her;
    "Inasmuch as it is nothing but pure communicability, every face, even the most noble and beautiful, is always suspended on the edge of an abyss"

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    Many people believed, and some still do, that because Elizabeth loved courtship and flirtation she was sexually immoral, but in fact she lived a very circumscribed life – she was hardly ever alone,

    So Fi flexible. so so so so
    -
    Dual type (as per tcaudilllg)
    Enneagram 2w1sw(1w9) helps others to live up to their own standards of what a good person is and is very behind the scenes in the process.
    Tritype 1-2-6 stacking sp/sx


    I'm constantly looking to align the real with the ideal.I've been more oriented toward being overly idealistic by expecting the real to match the ideal. My thinking side is dominent. The result is that sometimes I can be overly impersonal or self-centered in my approach, not being understanding of others in the process and simply thinking "you should do this" or "everyone should follor this rule"..."regardless of how they feel or where they're coming from"which just isn't a good attitude to have. It is a way, though, to give oneself an artificial sense of self-justification. LSE

    Best description of functions:
    http://socionicsstudy.blogspot.com/2...functions.html

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    Queen Elizabeth had from adolescence been imbued with the beliefs and teachings of the Cambridge reformers who tutored her, yet although she grew up in and professed the Protestant faith, she was no reformer herself; it was the traditional ritual and ceremony of religion, the glorious anthems and motets sung by her choristers, and the intellectual satisfaction of theological literature that appealed to her. She knew that literature well, informing Parliament in 1566 that ‘I studied nothing but divinity till I came to the Crown.’ Furthermore, in an age in which people were burned for their beliefs, she held surprisingly enlightened views. ‘There is only one Jesus Christ,’ she declared to one French ambassador, André Hurault, Sieur de Maisse. ‘The rest is a dispute over trifles.’
    When she learned that King Philip was persecuting Protestants in the Spanish Netherlands, she wrote to ask him why it mattered to him if his subjects chose to go to the Devil in their own way. She shocked one of Philip’s ambassadors by flippantly expressing her hope that she would be saved as well as the Bishop of Rome, as English Protestants called the Pope. Later in the reign, she refused to allow Sir Walter Raleigh’s suspected atheism to be investigated, on the grounds that she enjoyed theological arguments with him.
    Sermons – one of the chief features of morning services in Protestant churches – were her particular bugbear, and woe betide those clergymen who preached for more than an hour. She had even less time for those who attempted to instruct her from the pulpit as she sat in the royal closet with its lattice window, which she might have open or shut, according to her mood. ‘To your text, Mr Dean! To your text!’ she would shout, or she would send a message to the preacher, warning him to desist from an offending theme.
    Yet there were more cogent reasons for Elizabeth’s dislike of sermons: preaching offered a forum for men to air their opinions, which, given the religious climate of the times, could only lead to disputes and cause public unrest. Those extreme Protestants who would come to be known as Puritans were heartily disapproved of by Elizabeth, not only for their fanaticism, but also because they insisted upon a ‘preaching ministry’. Most of her subjects applauded her stand against Puritanism, especially after 1585 when she quashed a Puritan Bill aimed at banning all sports and entertainments on Sundays. The Queen felt that her people had a right to spend their only day of rest enjoying themselves as they pleased, without interference from killjoys. She also refused to agree to the suggestion – again from a Puritan source – that heresy, adultery and blasphemy be made criminal offences. In her opinion, those things were matters of conscience, not of law.
    Like most of her subjects, the Queen was horrified and repelled by reports of the mass burnings of heretics by the Inquisition in Spain. As far as she was concerned, a man’s conscience was his own. According to Sir Francis Bacon, she lived by the maxim, ‘Consciences are not to be forced’, and she ‘would not have any unnecessarily sifted to know what affection they had towards the old religion’. Her Majesty, he wrote, had no ‘liking to make windows into men’s hearts and secret thoughts’. All she wanted from her subjects was loyalty to herself and the state and outward conformity to her laws governing religion.
    .
    "hag is the elizabeth bathory of t16t" – Luminous Lynx

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    Spiritual greed para's Avatar
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    LIE.
    Nothing is so difficult as not deceiving oneself.

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    Quote Originally Posted by para View Post
    LIE.

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    Elizabeth's father was Henry VIII.

    Henry VIII of England - ENFP - Huxley




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    Elizabeth's mother was Anne Boleyn.

    Anne Boleyn - ESFP - Napoleon ?




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    Elizabeth I of England - INTJ - Robespierre

    The wooden head of a funeral effigy of Queen Elizabeth I.





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    Queen Elizabeth I of England - Robespierre


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    Mary I of Scotland - Mary Stuart - ESTJ - Stierlitz ?










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    Maria Stuart - Stierlitz ??


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