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Thread: Neurotypical Introversion vs. Aspergers Syndrome

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    suedehead's Avatar
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    Default Neurotypical Introversion vs. Aspergers Syndrome

    What's the difference in terms of social behavior and cognition?

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    ouronis's Avatar
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    one is suedehead and the other is not
    salmon

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    social behavior = posting these topics on the forum
    cognition = the madness behind that

    *i've been contemplating posting something dumb all morning, unrelated to this*

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    Asperger's is not
    1. introversion.
    2. related to burgers and outer area around buttocks and rectum opening.

    If you look at diagnosed cases it becomes very clear that the diagnosis itself is very hazy. It is much blurrier than the original. In original report written by Hans Asperger it sounded lot like NTs (and maybe there was an IEI in the mix) gone wrong . These days it sounds a lot like unsociable LSIs.

    I have met one identical case to original report. LII, I think. He had an ESE friend/babysitter around the same age. Very responsive to Fe when directed to him but usually got lost from the real world. He used some violence because as I said that he didn't understand immediate world around him.

    Anyway, it is not social introversion. It is much closer of having poor capacity being socially acceptable while not being handicapped in any other way.
    Enneagram 3 blindspot. Visual deficits in 4, 8. Triple instinctual blindspot.

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    Haikus Beautiful sky's Avatar
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    Are you trying to self diagnose?

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    I think a good litmus test is whether a person's communication deficits extend to their private life or socializing in an anonymous setting like an internet forum. The most reclusive neurotypical probably displays normative social/empathetic behavior when communicating with their parents or close friends for example. In contrast, I barely communicate with my parents unless I need something from them (in which case, I bark orders at them coldly), and I can't remember ever engaging in a reciprocal interaction with a single person on here. There's an insuperable barrier between me and other people.
    Last edited by suedehead; 04-15-2016 at 02:41 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by suedehead View Post
    I think a good litmus test is whether a person's communication deficits extend to their private life or socializing in an anonymous setting like an internet forum. The most reclusive neurotypical probably displays normative social/empathetic behavior when communicating with their parents or close friends for example. In contrast, I barely communicate with my parents unless I need something from them (in which case, I bark orders at them coldly), and I can't remember ever engaging in a reciprocal interaction with a single person on here. There's an insuperable barrier between me and other people.
    That seems to have more to do with you not being willing to listen to anything beyond what you've already decided (if you're not just a troll playing around) than anything else. I don't know suede, are you a troll? Are you giggling to yourself as you post topic after topic regarding your supposed deficits and watch as people take you seriously?

    If you're not a troll, then yeah something seems to be going on with you, but I don't know what it is.

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    My grievances are genuine, in spite of the occasional rhetorical flourish.

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    ok. maybe you could make a list of those grievances and talk to a counselor to see if they could help you sort them out?



    as for my limited knowledge of autism - a key feature is that the autistic don't read subtlety very well. Bad at picking up on between-the-lines stuff, subtle humor, and expressions/tone of voice. Nuance is missed. It's a little like when you're speaking to a non-native speaker in your native language and even though they are fluent, there are some figures of speech, or usage of words that they don't pick up on and the meaning either gets distorted or missed. The autistic can have a huge vocabulary but still miss the meaning of something. I was just watching the newest episode of Bones - and Bones is probably a good example of this. She's very smart, but doesn't get a lot of jokes and doesn't follow non-linear reasoning very well.

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    Is it possible for someone who finds meaning in nearly every social situation or exaggerates and can mull over every second of every interaction (before and after it occurs) with a human, to have Asperger's?

    It could have been a misdiagnosis for me.

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    24601 ClownsandEntropy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chryssie View Post
    Is it possible for someone who finds meaning in nearly every social situation or exaggerates and can mull over every second of every interaction (before and after it occurs) with a human, to have Asperger's?

    It could have been a misdiagnosis for me.
    Those on the autism spectrum generally have a form of mind-blindness: They find it hard to understand people's inner thoughts and feelings, because they don't naturally pick those things up.

    Someone on the spectrum who is overly sensitive to the fact that they're mind-blind may focus on that a lot, which would lead them to, as you say, mull over every interaction.

    However, I don't know if that's considered a typical autism spectrum behaviour.

    The other possibility is that you overly focus on it because it's one of your narrow interests. It doesn't sound like this is the case, though. Do you feel like you enter flow and get huge levels of enjoyment from just thinking and reflecting about people's reactions?
    Warm Regards,



    Clowns & Entropy

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    Quote Originally Posted by ClownsandEntropy View Post
    Those on the autism spectrum generally have a form of mind-blindness: They find it hard to understand people's inner thoughts and feelings, because they don't naturally pick those things up.

    Someone on the spectrum who is overly sensitive to the fact that they're mind-blind may focus on that a lot, which would lead them to, as you say, mull over every interaction.

    However, I don't know if that's considered a typical autism spectrum behaviour.

    The other possibility is that you overly focus on it because it's one of your narrow interests. It doesn't sound like this is the case, though. Do you feel like you enter flow and get huge levels of enjoyment from just thinking and reflecting about people's reactions?
    I don't get much enjoyment from it because it's mostly anxiety based, focusing on everything that went wrong and how an interaction may have negatively affected our relationship or whether there was a missed opportunity I didn't take advantage of. I don't talk much, possibly one of the reasons being so that I wouldn't be overwhelmed about having to analyze and keep track of all their reactions, and so there'd be less chance of a given interaction going wrong and thus giving a more negative net attraction.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chryssie View Post
    I don't get much enjoyment from it because it's mostly anxiety based, focusing on everything that went wrong and how an interaction may have negatively affected our relationship or whether there was a missed opportunity I didn't take advantage of. I don't talk much, possibly one of the reasons being so that I wouldn't be overwhelmed about having to analyze and keep track of all their reactions, and so there'd be less chance of a given interaction going wrong and thus giving a more negative net attraction.
    Probably not Aspergers, but something worth working through anyway. It's good you've got a firm grasp on the problem, though, it should be easier for you to overcome?
    Warm Regards,



    Clowns & Entropy

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