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Thread: MBTI - Your childhood type - can you relate?

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    Default MBTI - Your childhood type - can you relate?

    Can you relate to your childhood MBTI description?

    I find I can pretty much relate to everything about the EN*P personality. It also kind of strikes home how badly I needed some kind of guidance as a child rather than being punished EN*P.

    I can especially relate to:

    ENPs are not very concerned with their grades, or with doing their homework. They will resist doing assignments that they find tedious. They are far more interested in understanding the theory behind a problem than they are in actually doing the problem. They learn best by theory rather than by example. They need to understand the theory before they can do anything. Teachers should communicate the theory behind the practical application in order to get through to the ENP.

    Let's use division as an example. Some children learn how to divide numbers best by doing it over and over again. They learn by example and repetition. Once they have done a lot of different division problems, they understand how it works and are comfortable with dividing numbers. ENPs learn division best by understanding the concepting of dividing a whole number into smaller parts. They see a circle with a line drawn down the middle, and understand that the whole has been cut in half, or "divided" in half. Once they understand the theory, they can apply this to their division problems and they are comfortable with dividing numbers.
    I learned to despise math because of this. I would try to actually visualize this stuff so I could learn and had teachers make me stop. I figured out at a young age that I learn different than other kids. I HAD to have the theory, concept, why etc. of something before I could begin to grasp it. To force me to go through the details first was just downright unproductive.

    I would try to do it my way but would get in trouble and be accused of being uncooperative. When in reality, it was them actually being uncooperative....I knew exactly what needed to be done. I learn by understanding, not remembering. As a child though, I had a hard time explaining it and thought I must just be stupid. I really withdrew in the classroom because of it.

    People would get angry at me and tell me I was smart but just really lazy because I couldn't learn in repetitive detailed ways.

    Because I don't care about grades or anything, mostly I just gave up trying to deal with them and prefered to just fail rather than do something I knew was futile.

    I can also relate to the personality change that happens around 13. When I was 12 I went through a major shift in personality. I definately became more of a thinker at that point. My grades in school started to improve quite a bit too.

    I was the kid that was, maybe a bit of a rebel but all in all, had her head on straight. [/url]
    Polly
    ENTp

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    Yes, I can identify with everything listed. It brought back a lot of memories especially of my mother bitching at me to pay attention to my environment (don't just step over it, pick it up!)

    My mother is an INJ and it seems that many of the things that she got mad at me about or tried to push me to were probably compensation for her own childhood (she's told me as much).
    All Hail The Flying Spaghetti Monster

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    Nope. Sounds like all ESxP types have ADHD as children, which wasn't true in my experience. Most of the ones I know were shyer than now; except the 2-3 troublemakers, which are NOW shyer.

    I was muuch more I and J at school as a child.
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    Quote Originally Posted by FDG
    Nope. Sounds like all ESxP types have ADHD as children, which wasn't true in my experience. Most of the ones I know were shyer than now; except the 2-3 troublemakers, which are NOW shyer.

    I was muuch more I and J at school as a child.
    Some of the ESP description seems accurate for what I know about Daniel's childhood and some of it not. I know he was popular, but not artistic nor did he like everyone.

    I can't imagine a shy ESTp :wink:
    All Hail The Flying Spaghetti Monster

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    "shyer than now" doesn't mean shy at all! Also, without realizing, I tend to use "shy" as related to feeling functions.
    Obsequium amicos, veritas odium parit

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    Quote Originally Posted by oyburger
    I can't imagine a shy ESTp :wink:
    ESTp I know was sort of shyish while kid. Well there were only some moments when he was very ESTpish. He was somewhat social and did some sports but he wasn't any kind of leader or very confrontational and such. He started to become more and more ESTpish at around 14-15 and at around 20 he was a full blown ESTp spending his first college year drinking beer and fucking every girl in the campus. He has an ok job now and is in a long term relationship with a decent chick so seems to be going into right direction. Age 20-25 he was pretty much out of control. Anyways he was a bit of a pussy around age of 10-12 when I learned to know him. Especially one ENTj used to ridicule and dominate him in the class. And one ISTj a bit too. By no means he was like the "alpha male" he later became. He is still not the most dominating person I know but much more than your average Joe.

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    I can relate to most of the IFP childhood personality. Some Myers-Briggs INFP personality descriptions fit me really well, because they're sometimes written from an Fi-Ne perspective.

    I was pretty hard on myself, as the profile says. I was such a perfectionist (still am but working on it), especially in school. I remember my first "bad" grade. It was in 3rd grade. We had been studying bats and took a quiz. I came home wildly sobbing. When my mom asked what was wrong, I screamed, "I got a C in bat facts!!!" I think my mom and sister started laughing at me, which made me even more upset

    It's interesting that they say IFP kids can be empathetic and idealistic at a young age. Whey I was about preschool-kindergarten age, my mother says that I would to come up to her on several occasions, and with a really serious look on my face, ask questions like, "Mom, what are we going to do about all the homeless people?" and "How are we going to stop war?"

    I was also pretty sensitive, too. I wasn't as much of a pushover, though. My mom says I was quick to show anger when I didn't like something.

    I think having a sweet ENFp mom has been really good for me. She's always shown me so much love and is my #1 cheerleader

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    1. They have vivid imaginations
    2. They're curious about everything, and are always asking "Why?"
    3. They enjoy spending time one-on-one with others, rather than in large groups
    4. They're often off in their own world, and have a dreamlike quality
    5. They enjoy art and music
    6. They love books, and especially enjoy fiction
    7. They're likely to hang back and watch before participating in a social situation
    8. They're intensely private, and don't always share their thought and feelings
    9. They like structure and are unsettled by chaos or unplanned events
    10. They prefer sports that focus on individual performance rather than team sports
    11. They are perfectionists
    12. They're serious and intense
    13. They often seem older than they are, and may have older friends
    14. They are original and independent, and value their uniqueness
    15. They're not overly concerned with grades, but they want to completely understand a subject that interests them
    I guess so... but I never liked fiction I liked Fantasy video games, that's for sure. But reading a book wasn't appealing to me

    Everything else was essentially spot on
    Pre-2013 post are written with incomplete understanding.

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