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Thread: Filatova's EII description from Understanding The People Around You

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    Default Filatova's EII description from Understanding The People Around You

    Ekaterina Filatova, Understanding The People Around You: An Introduction To Socionics (Hollister: MSI Press, 2006), 59-62:


    - pp. 59-62 [THE PSYCHOLOGIST: Feeling-Intuitive Introvert (FII)]:
    , , ,



    General Appearance

    The distinguishing feature of this psychological type is an impassive face and a vague look in the eyes, as if Psychologists (FIIs) are locked into themselves and only loosely connected with reality. Around the feeling subtype of Psychologists, an air of doubt and apprehensiveness can be felt, while the intuitive subtype is more open, friendly, and outgoing. If Psychologists dislike something, they may clam up for a while and <live through it>. They know how to dress with style if they think about it, but may well ignore their appearance during periods of depression, which are not uncommon.


    Characterization According to Strong Channel Functions

    I. Personality Program Channel ( -- psychological environment, relations...)



    While Psychologists promptly sense the complexity of interactions between people in any group, they restrain from revealing their own views. They try to smooth over any misunderstandings, always avoiding conflict: when a friend does not remember the Psychologist settling a debt, the Psychologist would prefer to quickly pay again, though quite confident in having paid the first time. Psychologists cannot stand quarrels and would put up with a lot to avoid them. They believe that <better a lean peace than a fat victory>. If their patience comes to an end, they do not rage or yell. They simply erect a mental barrier between themselves and the offender -- keeping a <stony> face, answering questions single-wordedly, and acting cold and official. If they hear that someone is in distress, Psychologists will go and try to help in any way possible. This can take the form of financial help or just lending an ear, taking some of the emotional burden upon themselves. People often come to Psychologists for a shoulder to cry on, finding them sympathetic listeners.


    Psychologists cannot stand seeing someone hurt in front of them, especially a child, even if the child is being punished by his or her parents. In situations like this, they might approach the child's parents and talk to them:

    You're teaching your child to be cruel! She will act the same way to you when you're old and weak!



    They will make sure the child does not hear this criticism. With their own children, Psychologists try to be fair: if they feel that they are in the wrong, they will ask the child's forgiveness.

    If a Psychologist does something he feels proud of, then he childishly brags about it. Sometimes Psychologists are frank before strangers, sharing with them personal matters that they usually do not speak about. Later they may regret this and wonder why they did it.

    Once they fall in love, Psychologists may keep their feelings concealed for years. However, if their torment is overwhelming, they may give up and confess to the object of their affections, most likely in writing. They do not care about the outcome, as long as their suffering stops.


    II. Productive Channel ( -- potential abilities, alternatives...)

    Harmony in relationships with people is a Psychologist's life credo. To achieve this harmony, they search for true values in the world of inner-self and morality. From their youth, Psychologists make every effort to become the ideal they have shaped in their minds. Teenagers of this type often keep a diary, where they record their observations (mostly about themselves) and analyze their actions, harshly criticizing themselves for even the tiniest step away from the ideal.

    A classic example:

    A 15-year old high-school student, a Psychologist, had been saving his lunch money for a long time in order to buy the Swiss army knife which he wanted. When he had enough money, he realized that the knife was no longer being sold in stores, but there were two other Swiss knives: one that was even more expensive and attractive, and the other that was the same price, but not very appealing. What should he do? Wait and save up enough money for the better knife? However, he was set on buying a knife today. He stood at the window for a long time, staring longingly at the unreachable <treasure>, but finally bought the cheaper knife. On leaving the store, he realized that the lady in the store had given him the other knife, the one he dreamed about. Here began his miseries. He stood for an hour at the door of the store, not able to return the object of his dreams. On the other hand, he felt morally wrong because he did not return the expensive Swiss army knife to the lady—that is, he deceived her. Finally, he settled on a compromise. He would keep the knife, but in the future, he would give back anything he got dishonestly right away, before he fell in love with it.

    From this example, it is obvious that Psychologists can mull for a long time over something anybody else would consider a given.

    The priority of moral values can emerge in the Psychologists' life in the most unusual situations: for example, when the person they love prefers another, they may help their competitor get promoted. Psychologists consider harming their rival in this situation dishonorable.

    When high ideals and moral values are determined by a genuine love of people, a person of this type can be very useful to the community as a teacher, preacher, counselor—a role model, in other words. As opposed to that, a Psychologist may also become an annoying moralizer and a bothersome lecturer.



    Characterization According to Weak Channel Functions

    III. Vulnerable Channel ( -- volitional pressuring, activeness, survival in harsh competition...)




    Psychologists take everything related to violence in any form very painfully. They judge their own actions in the categories of persistence and determination. They shape these qualities within themselves: they can work out a daily schedule, hang it on the wall, and systematically follow it. However, Psychologists tend to overexert themselves with vows approaching the point of self-torture. For example,

    A ninth grade girl with acrophobia (fear of heights) struggled to strengthen her willpower, by forcing herself to walk over a river on a disassembled bridge, from which only a single 450-foot long metal rail was left. (There was a newly built bridge nearby). When she achieved the goal, she decided to go back the same way, as it was not enough for her, though her knees were shaking from exhaustion. With great difficulty, pausing and looking up to fight dizziness, she made it from an island to the mainland, with a crowd of very agitated onlookers yelling at her. This endeavor nearly cost the girl her life.

    The Psychologists' slogan of self-perfection is <Do not what is wanted, but what is needed>. While treating themselves this way (sometimes very harshly), Psychologists do not, however, press others, believing that everyone should improve upon themselves. They cannot tolerate someone trying to force them to do something: they prefer to have nothing in common with people like this.


    IV. Suggestible Channel ( -- pragmatism, efficacy...)

    Psychologists lack a strong ability to work effectively, and this shortcoming is at odds with their battle towards self-perfection. As a result, they may force themselves to work <from dawn till dusk>, exhausting themselves and wasting a lot of strength and energy where another person would do the same thing with a lot less exertion. The Psychologist gladly lets others teach him or her how to work more efficiently and feels grateful towards the person who does that. In this next example, a woman, a Psychologist, recalls:

    I had a hard time trying to learn how to use my computer all by myself. Luckily, my 12-year-old son is skilled in computers. Once, he showed me how to use the <Help> function when you don't know how a program works. It turned out to be pretty straightforward. Since that time I always use this function when I am uncertain what to do.

    In order to work productively, Psychologists require a favorable psychological atmosphere. They do not get along well with a boss who considers them incompetent. If their colleagues share their moral beliefs, they switch into work mode and are capable of working very productively.

    Job Options

    The best ways to make use of the Psychologists' abilities lie in the spheres of philosophy, religion, or missionary enlightenment. People of this psychological type can also be successful in education, and many FIIs feel pulled toward psychology. FIIs can also be found working in the field of art, though rarely as actors or actresses, as it is hard for them to perform in front of a large audience; rather, they are good at teaching in the Humanist field, or in colleges of the visual arts.

    Famous FIIs: actor—Jeremy Irons; artist—Vincent Van Gogh; writers—Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Alexander Solzhenitsyn; politicians—Nicholas II (the last Russian tsar).






    Ekaterina Filatova, Understanding The People Around You: An Introduction To Socionics (Hollister: MSI Press, 2006), 59-62:


    - pp. 59-62 [THE PSYCHOLOGIST: Feeling-Intuitive Introvert (FII)]:
    , , ,



    General Appearance

    The distinguishing feature of this psychological type is an impassive face and a vague look in the eyes, as if Psychologists (FIIs) are locked into themselves and only loosely connected with reality. Around the feeling subtype of Psychologists, an air of doubt and apprehensiveness can be felt, while the intuitive subtype is more open, friendly, and outgoing. If Psychologists dislike something, they may clam up for a while and <live through it>. They know how to dress with style if they think about it, but may well ignore their appearance during periods of depression, which are not uncommon.


    Characterization According to Strong Channel Functions

    I. Personality Program Channel ( -- psychological environment, relations...)



    While Psychologists promptly sense the complexity of interactions between people in any group, they restrain from revealing their own views. They try to smooth over any misunderstandings, always avoiding conflict: when a friend does not remember the Psychologist settling a debt, the Psychologist would prefer to quickly pay again, though quite confident in having paid the first time. Psychologists cannot stand quarrels and would put up with a lot to avoid them. They believe that <better a lean peace than a fat victory>. If their patience comes to an end, they do not rage or yell. They simply erect a mental barrier between themselves and the offender -- keeping a <stony> face, answering questions single-wordedly, and acting cold and official. If they hear that someone is in distress, Psychologists will go and try to help in any way possible. This can take the form of financial help or just lending an ear, taking some of the emotional burden upon themselves. People often come to Psychologists for a shoulder to cry on, finding them sympathetic listeners.


    Psychologists cannot stand seeing someone hurt in front of them, especially a child, even if the child is being punished by his or her parents. In situations like this, they might approach the child's parents and talk to them:

    You're teaching your child to be cruel! She will act the same way to you when you're old and weak!



    They will make sure the child does not hear this criticism. With their own children, Psychologists try to be fair: if they feel that they are in the wrong, they will ask the child's forgiveness.

    If a Psychologist does something he feels proud of, then he childishly brags about it. Sometimes Psychologists are frank before strangers, sharing with them personal matters that they usually do not speak about. Later they may regret this and wonder why they did it.

    Once they fall in love, Psychologists may keep their feelings concealed for years. However, if their torment is overwhelming, they may give up and confess to the object of their affections, most likely in writing. They do not care about the outcome, as long as their suffering stops.


    II. Productive Channel ( -- potential abilities, alternatives...)

    Harmony in relationships with people is a Psychologist's life credo. To achieve this harmony, they search for true values in the world of inner-self and morality. From their youth, Psychologists make every effort to become the ideal they have shaped in their minds. Teenagers of this type often keep a diary, where they record their observations (mostly about themselves) and analyze their actions, harshly criticizing themselves for even the tiniest step away from the ideal.

    A classic example:

    A 15-year old high-school student, a Psychologist, had been saving his lunch money for a long time in order to buy the Swiss army knife which he wanted. When he had enough money, he realized that the knife was no longer being sold in stores, but there were two other Swiss knives: one that was even more expensive and attractive, and the other that was the same price, but not very appealing. What should he do? Wait and save up enough money for the better knife? However, he was set on buying a knife today. He stood at the window for a long time, staring longingly at the unreachable <treasure>, but finally bought the cheaper knife. On leaving the store, he realized that the lady in the store had given him the other knife, the one he dreamed about. Here began his miseries. He stood for an hour at the door of the store, not able to return the object of his dreams. On the other hand, he felt morally wrong because he did not return the expensive Swiss army knife to the lady—that is, he deceived her. Finally, he settled on a compromise. He would keep the knife, but in the future, he would give back anything he got dishonestly right away, before he fell in love with it.

    From this example, it is obvious that Psychologists can mull for a long time over something anybody else would consider a given.

    The priority of moral values can emerge in the Psychologists' life in the most unusual situations: for example, when the person they love prefers another, they may help their competitor get promoted. Psychologists consider harming their rival in this situation dishonorable.

    When high ideals and moral values are determined by a genuine love of people, a person of this type can be very useful to the community as a teacher, preacher, counselor—a role model, in other words. As opposed to that, a Psychologist may also become an annoying moralizer and a bothersome lecturer.


    Characterization According to Weak Channel Functions

    III. Vulnerable Channel ( -- volitional pressuring, activeness, survival in harsh competition...)




    Psychologists take everything related to violence in any form very painfully. They judge their own actions in the categories of persistence and determination. They shape these qualities within themselves: they can work out a daily schedule, hang it on the wall, and systematically follow it. However, Psychologists tend to overexert themselves with vows approaching the point of self-torture. For example,

    A ninth grade girl with acrophobia (fear of heights) struggled to strengthen her willpower, by forcing herself to walk over a river on a disassembled bridge, from which only a single 450-foot long metal rail was left. (There was a newly built bridge nearby). When she achieved the goal, she decided to go back the same way, as it was not enough for her, though her knees were shaking from exhaustion. With great difficulty, pausing and looking up to fight dizziness, she made it from an island to the mainland, with a crowd of very agitated onlookers yelling at her. This endeavor nearly cost the girl her life.

    The Psychologists' slogan of self-perfection is <Do not what is wanted, but what is needed>. While treating themselves this way (sometimes very harshly), Psychologists do not, however, press others, believing that everyone should improve upon themselves. They cannot tolerate someone trying to force them to do something: they prefer to have nothing in common with people like this.


    IV. Suggestible Channel ( -- pragmatism, efficacy...)

    Psychologists lack a strong ability to work effectively, and this shortcoming is at odds with their battle towards self-perfection. As a result, they may force themselves to work <from dawn till dusk>, exhausting themselves and wasting a lot of strength and energy where another person would do the same thing with a lot less exertion. The Psychologist gladly lets others teach him or her how to work more efficiently and feels grateful towards the person who does that. In this next example, a woman, a Psychologist, recalls:

    I had a hard time trying to learn how to use my computer all by myself. Luckily, my 12-year-old son is skilled in computers. Once, he showed me how to use the <Help> function when you don't know how a program works. It turned out to be pretty straightforward. Since that time I always use this function when I am uncertain what to do.

    In order to work productively, Psychologists require a favorable psychological atmosphere. They do not get along well with a boss who considers them incompetent. If their colleagues share their moral beliefs, they switch into work mode and are capable of working very productively.

    Job Options

    The best ways to make use of the Psychologists' abilities lie in the spheres of philosophy, religion, or missionary enlightenment. People of this psychological type can also be successful in education, and many FIIs feel pulled toward psychology. FIIs can also be found working in the field of art, though rarely as actors or actresses, as it is hard for them to perform in front of a large audience; rather, they are good at teaching in the Humanist field, or in colleges of the visual arts.

    Famous FIIs: actor—Jeremy Irons; artist—Vincent Van Gogh; writers—Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Alexander Solzhenitsyn; politicians—Nicholas II (the last Russian tsar).
    Last edited by HERO; 08-18-2014 at 08:58 PM.

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