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Thread: Motion sickness

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    Idiot Iris's Avatar
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    Default Motion sickness

    Motion sickness:

    1. Do you suffer from it?
    2. Briefly tell how you attempt to cope with it.
    3. Is it an issue for you in your occupation?
    4. Extra points for stating your socionics type or quadra.

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    when you see the booty Galen's Avatar
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    1. All the time. My inner ear must have some vendetta against me, because any time I board a train, airplane, unfamiliar car (especially if the "new car smell" still lingers), boat, I have to be consciously aware of how dizzy I'm getting and what to focus on if it gets particularly out of hand. One time I had to stay on a train for four hours between stations while dry-heaving in the bathroom and losing a good 65% of all the water in my body.

    Not sure if this applies to other people, but I find that for me personally, motion sickness is always set off by a disconnect between one's own sense of balance and the surrounding environment. When I'm standing on a train and it starts to move when I'm not anticipating, or conversely when I expect it to move and prepare accordingly but it stays still, I always feel little pangs of nausea. Don't know if you've noticed this, but it's very rare for anyone to get carsick while driving; unless you have terrible handling over what you're driving, that's the reason. Being tired, dehydrated, and/or overheated exacerbates the nausea lot as well.


    2. So far there are two foolproof preventers/cures I've found.

    Any over-the-counter medicine should do the trick, so long as you give yourself enough time beforehand for the antihistamine to kick in. I give it about a half hour to 45 minutes for Dramamine to work before I get on a long train/airplane/bus ride. What I, as well as several other people in my family, have discovered is that once you start to feel the very first signs of motion sickness, it sets of an irreversible chain reaction, and the only way for it to stop is to get out of the vehicle and get some fresh air. Dramamine and the like will not work if you're already in the throes of nausea.

    The second cure-all, which seems to work for anything stomach or nausea-related, is ginger. I've never found out what about ginger makes it a good nausea cure, but from both personal anecdote and outside research I say it does the job every time. When you're on a long trip, I recommend taking some candied ginger or even a small bin of Japanese pickled ginger if you can stand it ("Gari," as it's called).


    3. It can be, considering how I have to take the train to go into the city. At one point I had to miss a day of interning because I got miserably nauseated 15 minutes into the train ride.


    4. NO
    "And above all, watch with glittering eyes the whole world around you because the greatest secrets are always hidden in the most unlikely places. Those who don't believe in magic will never find it." -Roald Dahl

    http://forum.socionix.com/
    It's pretty cool

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    ■■■■■■ Radio's Avatar
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    1. Do you suffer from it?

    Yeah. Aside from the ones Galen listed, any time I watch something where the camera moves too smoothly (e.g. this), or lacks a point of focus (e.g. FPSs, shaky-cam, home movies), sit on a ride that spins/rotates, attempt to read in a car, lie down on a swing-bed-thing (don't know what they're called), the nausea kicks in and ruins the rest of my day.

    2. Briefly tell how you attempt to cope with it.

    I don't do those things unless I absolutely have to. Closing my eyes/finding a point of focus/frequently looking away/carbonated drinks help a bit. The only thing that cures it is sleep.

    3. Is it an issue for you in your occupation?

    Not at the moment but I can imagine it could be.

    4. Extra points for stating your socionics type or quadra.

    GUESS

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    Idiot Iris's Avatar
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    I was surprised to read that Horatio Nelson suffered from seasickness during his naval career. Not much makes me motion sick, but on the few occasions I have experienced it (riding on the Gravatron at Funland, for example!) I could barely function. So I was curious about attitudes and coping techniques.
    @Galen I had noticed that being the driver helped a carsick friend, also she prefers not to ride in the back seat, maybe its less bumpy or you can see whats coming better?
    @Radio I know a few people who felt sick watching Les Miserables because of the movement of the camera.

    My mother suffered from all kinds of motion sickness and had to take dramamine til she was about 35. Then she stopped being bothered by it.

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    when you see the booty Galen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Iris View Post
    @Galen I had noticed that being the driver helped a carsick friend, also she prefers not to ride in the back seat, maybe its less bumpy or you can see whats coming better?
    That's not necessarily the point I was trying to make.

    Assuming one is in proper control of the vehicle, the driver has the capacity to prepare him/herself for sudden changes in velocity, g-forces, etc. since he's in control of what's happening. If motion sickness is caused by a disconnect between different senses that communicate velocity and motion to the brain, as seems to be the case for me, then having total control over one's own movements and oscillations through space would eliminate such a disconnect because the entire body and its sensory functions are engaged in the locomotion process.

    Sitting in the front seat with the windows rolled down a bit does help a bit too from my experience. The reasoning here, I think, is two-fold. Having the window rolled down lets in cool air that helps prevent the body from overheating and also reinforces the sense of movement through space through greater sensory input. Being in the front seat not only expands your peripheral vision and gives you a better positional sense, but it also makes it a more viable option to look straight ahead to your intended physical trajectory. Looking out of a side window while the rest of your body is traveling in a different direction can easily create an internal disconnect and start the nausea chain. Likewise, looking down at a book can create that disconnect not only between expected trajectory and balance compensation, but also cuts off all visual sense of outside movement since you're moving at the same speed as the car's interior.
    "And above all, watch with glittering eyes the whole world around you because the greatest secrets are always hidden in the most unlikely places. Those who don't believe in magic will never find it." -Roald Dahl

    http://forum.socionix.com/
    It's pretty cool

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    expired Lotus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Iris View Post
    Motion sickness:

    1. Do you suffer from it?
    2. Briefly tell how you attempt to cope with it.
    3. Is it an issue for you in your occupation?
    4. Extra points for stating your socionics type or quadra.
    1. yes. car rides and boats.
    2. it helps if i sit in the front seat, with the window down. cold wind blowing in my face helps me feel less nauseous. or take motion sickness pills. or smoke weed. or harder unmentionables.
    3. no...
    4. prob gamma. se-isxj
    maybe a saint is just a dead prick with a good publicist
    maybe tommorow's statues are insecure without their foes
    go ask the frog what the scorpion knows

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    Idiot Iris's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by k0rpsy View Post
    In a recently spotted headline, transdermal scopolamine patches were recommended as a countermeasure to motion sickness.

    http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/dru...ation/DR602935
    Ha Korpsy, isn't that a truth drug?

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    Nah. The only time I actually experienced something akin to that has been when not having food for a long period of time.

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    Korpsy Knievel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Iris View Post
    Ha Korpsy, isn't that a truth drug?
    Wikipedia mentions that but I didn't read it. I'd assume that use as interrogation aid would result from a dosage somewhere between that used to control nausea and motion sickness, and a dosage sufficient to produce a deliriant hallucinogenic effect, the latter being how I'm familiar with scopolamine as a component of datura seeds. Given my personal experience with scopolamine in that form and interactions with other persons so affected I would not expect much more than nonsense or imaginary reporting from an interrogation subject exposed to that amount of the drug. I would also expect transdermal patches prescribed for motion sickness to contain too low a dosage to produce hallucination or marked susceptibility to suggestion or questioning.

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