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Thread: We all should forget to die

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    Haikus Beautiful sky's Avatar
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    Haikus Beautiful sky's Avatar
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    We're a really great bunch of folks here; our own Social club; I love this forum We socialize, we gossip, we love each other, we banter, jive, we get down. We get down!

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    Haikus Beautiful sky's Avatar
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    Moral of the story:

    Drink wine, tea, goat's milk, have sex regularly with vitality and good stamina; sleep in late, stay up late, take naps, eat fish twice a week, eat meat a couple times a month; garden, walk up hills, dance, there are some other things

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    The Soul Happy-er JWC3's Avatar
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    We get down!
    Easy Day

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    Ti centric krieger's Avatar
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    there has been some research that demonstrated that when old people are "tricked" into thinking they are younger, for example by making an environment they live in look more like the world did, say, 20 to 30 years ago, they both begin to look and to behave younger and even people who know nothing about the experiment who were shown pictures of these people judged their age to be lower than before it was performed.

    here is a blog post on it:

    In her book Counterclockwise, Harvard professor Ellen Langer recounts a groundbreaking study she did in 1979 that has since become the stuff of legend.

    She took a group of male research subjects in their 70′s and 80′s on a retreat. The environment had been manipulated to make it seem like it was twenty years prior.

    The residents were all aware of the real year but being immersed in the world of 1959 and being encouraged to act like they were younger men had powerful effects on them:

    The experimental group showed greater improvement on joint flexibility, finger length (their arthritis diminished and they were able to straighten their fingers more), and manual dexterity. On intelligence tests, 63 percent of the experimental group improved their scores, compared to only 44 percent of the control group. There were also improvements in height, weight, gait and posture. Finally, we asked people unaware of the study’s purpose to compare photos taken of the participants at the end of the week to those submitted at the beginning of the study. Those objective observers judged that all of the experimental participants looked noticeably younger at the end of the study.

    Other research shows people who held positive beliefs about getting older lived 7.5 years longer and were healthier.

    Women who dye their hair not only report feeling younger but their blood pressure drops and they are rated as looking younger in photos — photos where their hair is cropped out.

    “Will to live” has been shown to make a difference in when you die.

    Langer cites studies showing that women with younger spouses live longer and those with older spouses die younger. How we think about aging affects how we age:

    The psychologist Bernice Neugarten suggested that we are deeply influenced by “social clocks” — that we gauge our lives by the implicit belief that is a “right age” for certain behaviors or attitudes.

    Our mind may have more control over our body than we think. Processes we long believed to be out of our control, like heart rate and blood pressure, proved not to be.

    Via Counterclockwise:

    In 1961, Yale psychologist Neal Miller suggested that the autonomic nervous system, which controls blood pressure and heart rate, could be trained just like a voluntary system, which allows us to raise and lower our arm and other deliberate acts. His suggestion was met with a great deal of skepticism. Everyone knew that the autonomic nervous system was just that, autonomous and beyond our control. Yet his subsequent work on biofeedback — which makes autonomic processes such as heart rate visible by hooking people up to monitors — found that people could be taught to control them.

    Radiolab did an amazing piece explaining how exhaustion is more in the mind than the body and how athletes manipulate this to complete marathons and Ironman competitions.
    http://www.bakadesuyo.com/2012/09/ar...g-as-you-feel/
    Last edited by krieger; 11-02-2012 at 12:57 PM.

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    FoxOnStilts's Avatar
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    “Immortality is a concept. If you take ‘mortality’ as being, not death, but the foreknowledge of it and the fear of it, then ‘immortality’ is the absence of such fear. Babies are immortal. Edit out the fear, and you’ll be…”

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    Ti centric krieger's Avatar
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    WSJ Ideas Market points to an interesting interview over at APA with Howard Friedman, author of The Longevity Project: Surprising Discoveries for Health and Long Life from the Landmark Eight-Decade Study. Here are some highlights:

    On stress:

    There is a terrible misunderstanding about stress. Chronic physiological disturbance is not at all the same thing as hard work, social challenges or demanding careers. People are being given rotten advice to slow down, take it easy, stop worrying and retire to Florida. The Longevity Project discovered that those who worked the hardest lived the longest. The responsible and successful achievers thrived in every way, especially if they were dedicated to things and people beyond themselves.

    One study participant, Norris Bradbury, is a great example. He was the director of the Los Alamos National Laboratory for decades and was tremendously hard-working. It is hard to imagine a higher-pressure job than overseeing the development of the nation’s nuclear arsenal at a time of severe Cold War threats. Yet, he was tremendously successful in his long career, and, despite all the stresses and challenges, Bradbury lived a very long, healthy life — to age 88. This was the general pattern. Those who stayed very involved in meaningful careers and worked the hardest, lived the longest.
    http://www.bakadesuyo.com/2012/05/ha...t-takes-80098/

    another relevant one. getting old seems to be all about not giving up at what you productively do well. retiring early is anathema to longevity.

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    Darn Socks Director Abbie's Avatar
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    So I'll live longer if I go to church on Saturday instead of Sunday?

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    I'm not trying to find the magic formula to longevity. These studies are interesting and ultimately people should do whatever feels comfortable/right to them. I prefer this lifestyle, honestly. Someone pick me (and my beau) up and drop us here. I'm good with this kinds of lifestyle. And give us a house and some land.

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    7 pages long? fuq dat

    I would love to become a shaolin monk and live to be both centenarian and happy. But that's damn near impossible to accomplish in the states.
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    Decadent Charlatan Aquagraph's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JWC3 View Post
    We get down!
    YeAH, WE GET DOWN!!
    “I tell you, freedom and human rights in America are doomed. The U.S. government will lead the American people in — and the West in general — into an unbearable hell and a choking life. - Osama bin Laden

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    Ti centric krieger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by labster View Post
    http://www.bakadesuyo.com/2012/05/ha...t-takes-80098/

    another relevant one. getting old seems to be all about not giving up at what you productively do well. retiring early is anathema to longevity.
    i should add that there is one major pitfall to this: http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandsty...s-of-the-dying

    Top five regrets of the dying:
    2. I wish I hadn't worked so hard.

    "This came from every male patient that I nursed. They missed their children's youth and their partner's companionship. Women also spoke of this regret, but as most were from an older generation, many of the female patients had not been breadwinners. All of the men I nursed deeply regretted spending so much of their lives on the treadmill of a work existence."

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    cunnilingus epilepsy inducer
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    Quote Originally Posted by FoxOnStilts View Post
    “Immortality is a concept. If you take ‘mortality’ as being, not death, but the foreknowledge of it and the fear of it, then ‘immortality’ is the absence of such fear. Babies are immortal. Edit out the fear, and you’ll be…”
    I've heard that the spiritual tricks involved in "living in the moment", i.e releasing yourself from the past and future and concentrating on the now (so that the now is experienced as eternal), could be a way of overcoming mortality.
    Last edited by leckysupport; 11-02-2012 at 02:12 PM.

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    yeah taking it easy is good advice, which is what I got from the article. I can't believe the silly things the media/news does to shake people up and make them feel 'dramatic.' There's nothing wrong with feeling things, even negative things but it gets out of hand. Like I remember watching the news the other day and the reporter lady said in this epic serious tone: "A TREE FELL ... ON THE SIDEWALK. OH MY GOD GEORGE DO YOU SEE THE TREE AND HOW IT FELL BECAUSE THERE WAS A STORM" like it was the most interesting thing ever. Like seriously lady, go read a book about spirituality or something more dignified and classy will ya? What I don't like is how people way up in society are abusing their power by controlling the lower classes with drama when they themselves are snooty and uppity.

    I will continue to pray for a more equal, balanced, peaceful world. and for americans to take a chill pill.

    and yeah crappy/shitty/fucked up things happen in life but it's amazing how we forget that the overall tone of nature is sooo peaceful and balanced. and graceful.

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    24601 ClownsandEntropy's Avatar
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    I also don't want to be old and unable to do stuff like walk around without someone to make sure I'm okay. Or for my brain to start slowing down.
    Warm Regards,



    Clowns & Entropy

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    Ti centric krieger's Avatar
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    yeah taking it easy is good advice, which is what I got from the article.
    there was another piece of research that exposed that a moderate amount of stress and anxiety were conducive to long and healthy living. also having had a "fast paced life" is correlated with both happiness and longevity.

    I also don't want to be old and unable to do stuff like walk around without someone to make sure I'm okay. Or for my brain to start slowing down.
    many if not most things done towards prolonging one's life also improve the quality of one's life while still around and kicking. it's not an either-or thing.

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    Generator of Irony HandiAce's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by labster View Post
    there was another piece of research that exposed that a moderate amount of stress and anxiety were conducive to long and healthy living. also having had a "fast paced life" is correlated with both happiness and longevity.
    I actually can concur with what you say. A supercentenarian named Walter Breuning worked until age 67 and died at 114. Likewise, I read the book, Unbroken. A story about a man named Louie Zamperini who had to survive for a couple month on a float stranded in the Pacific Ocean during WWII and then captured by Japanese forces, living as a POW for two years under miserable conditions and stress. After the war was over, he suffered from PTSD and indulged in alcoholism. He did recover eventually. In fact, at 81, he ran a leg in the Olympic torch relay!. He is still living today at the age of 95!

    So there's no doubt that stress doesn't kill. I think that judging by what these individuals have gone through, they've been forced to face up to some difficulties in their life and overcame them by confronting their mental attitudes.

    Absurd: You Ti dominants sure say things I don't really know where to put.
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