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    (Currently soothing my enneagram 3 soul with this, I find these so important so here it goes)


    7 Things to Remember When You Think You’re Not Good Enough


    By Madison Sonnier

    1. The people you compare yourself to compare themselves to other people too.


    We all compare ourselves to other people, and I can assure you that the people who seem to have it all do not.
    When you look at other people through a lens of compassion and understanding rather than judgment and jealousy, you are better able to see them for what they are—human beings. They are beautifully imperfect human beings going through the same universal challenges that we all go through.

    2. Your mind can be a very convincing liar.

    I saw a quote once that said, “Don’t believe everything you think.” That quote completely altered the way I react when a cruel or discouraging thought goes through my mind. Thoughts are just thoughts, and it’s unhealthy and exhausting to give so much power to the negative ones.

    3. There is more right with you than wrong with you.

    This powerful reminder is inspired by one of my favorite quotes from Jon Kabat-Zinn: “Until you stop breathing, there’s more right with you than wrong with you.”
    As someone who sometimes tends to zoom in on all my perceived flaws, it helps to remember that there are lots of things I like about myself too—like the fact that I’m alive and breathing and able to pave new paths whenever I choose.

    4. You need love the most when you feel you deserve it the least.

    This was a recent epiphany of mine, although I’m sure it’s been said many times before.
    I find that it is most difficult to accept love and understanding from others when I’m in a state of anger, shame, anxiety, or depression. But adopting the above truth really shifted my perspective and made me realize that love is actually the greatest gift I can receive during such times.

    5. You have to fully accept and make peace with the “now” before you can reach and feel satisfied with the “later.”

    One thing I’ve learned about making changes and reaching for the next rung on the ladder is that you cannot fully feel satisfied with where you’re going until you can accept, acknowledge, and appreciate where you are.
    Embrace and make peace with where you are, and your journey toward something new will feel much more peaceful, rewarding, and satisfying.

    6. Focus on progress rather than perfection and on how far you’ve come rather than on how far you have left to go.

    One of the biggest causes of self-loathing is the hell-bent need to “get it right.” We strive for perfection and success, and when we fall short, we feel less than and worthless. What we don’t seem to realize is that striving for success and being willing to put ourselves out there is an accomplishment within itself, regardless of how many times we fail.
    Instead of berating yourself for messing up and stumbling backward, give yourself a pat on the back for trying, making progress, and coming as far as you have.

    7. You can’t hate your way into loving yourself.

    Telling yourself what a failure you are won’t make you any more successful. Telling yourself you’re not living up to your full potential won’t help you reach a higher potential. Telling yourself you’re worthless and unlovable won’t make you feel any more worthy or lovable.
    I know it sounds almost annoyingly simple, but the only way to achieve self-love is to love yourself—regardless of who you are and where you stand and even if you know you want to change.
    You are enough just as you are. And self-love will be a little bit easier every time you remind yourself of that.
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    Default Ina May's Guide to Childbirth by Ina May Gaskin

    There is no other organ quite like the uterus. If men had such an organ they would brag about it. So should we.

    __________________________


    This deep breathing did not make the pains less. Then the contractions became even more intense. Seeing that I was scared, Ina May suggested that I kiss my husband during the next contraction. This was the furthest thing from my mind but I did what she said. I should say here that my relationship had been rather rocky around this time, and the way we kissed each other had never been very satisfying to me. Anyway, while kissing the contractions continued to be strong. Ina May was sitting on the end of the bed, and she advised me to open my mouth enough to surround my husband's. It was at this point that I became more aroused than I had ever been in my life! There was no pain – only the most extreme sexual pleasure and complete openness. It was orgasmic. I'm sure that all of this happened within just a few seconds, but I passed through transition, and before I knew it, I was starting to push the baby out....I tell my kid's about my son's birth, because I know that this birth experience helped me through the years in my marriage – it confirmed the trust in such a vulnerable and sacred place.

    __________________________


    Remember this, for it is as true and true gets: Your body is not a lemon. You are not a machine. The Creator is not a careless mechanic. Human female bodies have the same potential to give birth well as aardvarks, lions, rhinoceri, elephants, moose, and water buffalo. Even if it has not been your habit throughout your life so far, I recommend that you learn to think positively about your body.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chae View Post
    Thank you - VERY important read, more of that. I want to add that those you addressed not to read it are exactly the ones that must read it. You displayed the very submissive behavior described in the text to appease potential attackers, perfect example. And: That ain't needed, encourage exactly those attackers to be confronted with this. Attackers are the ones with fear, otherwise they would have no need to control someone. So you don't have to be careful to post this - in fact, you are in a dominant position with this knowledge and therefore safe. The truth is like a lion, it defends itself Anddd on another note: please rest well <3
    Nah. Been there, done that. Getting dogpiled with sexual taunts and orders to make a sandwich is emotionally exhausting, I'd rather donate to planned parenthood or something.
    Hitta: lungs is like a reverse tootsie roll pop
    Hitta: sticky elastic external persona... strong core
    Hitta: or a bukkake girl

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    "The worship of the senses has often, and with much justice, been decried, men feeling a natural instinct of terror about passions and sensations that seem stronger than themselves, and that they are conscious of sharing with the less highly organized forms of existence. But it appeared to Dorian Gray that the true nature of the senses had never been understood, and that they had remained savage and animal merely because the world had sought to starve them into submission or to kill them by pain, instead of aiming at making them elements of a new spirituality, of which a fine instinct for beauty was to be the dominant characteristic. As he looked back upon man moving through history, he was haunted by a feeling of loss. So much had been surrendered! and to such little purpose! There had been mad wilful rejections, monstrous forms of self-torture and self-denial, whose origin was fear and whose result was a degradation infinitely more terrible than that fancied degradation from which, in their ignorance, they had sought to escape; Nature, in her wonderful irony, driving out the anchorite to feed with the wild animals of the desert and giving to the hermit the beasts of the field as his companions."

    "When I ought to be thinking of heaven he will nail me to earth"

     






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    "The somewhat less esoteric musical world came calling in early 1996, as Eno won his second Brit, this time a ‘Freddie Mercury Award’ (presented for outstanding consciousness-raising) for the Help! album. Eno collected the statuette accompanied by Radiohead’s Thom Yorke. Bryan Ferry was at Eno’s table; nearby sat Prime Minister-in-waiting (and King Crimson fan) Tony Blair and his entourage. The event was most memorable, however, for what occurred during a messianic, self-adulatory performance by Michael Jackson – a rendition of his preposterously overwrought ‘ecological power ballad’, ‘Earth Song’, replete with legions of innocent, frolicking young children. As the performance reached a histrionic climax, Jarvis Cocker, lead singer with then-cultish Britpop band Pulp, along with a friend, Peter Mansell, invaded the stage – Cocker executing a hilariously mocking, buttock revealing waggle-dance. Eno applauded loudly. In the onstage melee that ensued, according to Scotland Yard, one eleven-year-old boy was punched, another received a cut ear and a third was pushed offstage. Cocker was arrested, but released later with no charges pressed (it was elsewhere alleged that the injuries had been inadvertently caused by Jackson’s over-enthusiastic bodyguards).

    The following day, the mighty British tabloid press rounded on Cocker, apparently more willing to regurgitate an ‘outraged’ press release from Sony (Jackson’s record company) than they were to ask why anyone had seen to disrupt the questionable spectacle in the first place. Eno took an advert in the broadsheets the following week, reiterating his support for Cocker’s protest and lambasting Jackson’s performance."


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    "Neurosis and Human Growth"

    "The NEUROTIC in his search for glory goes astray into the realm of the fantastic, of the infinite, of boundless possibilities. To all outward appearances, he may lead a "normal" life as a member of his family and of his community, attend to his work and participate in recreational activities. Without realizing it, or at least without realizing the extent of it, he lives in two worlds—that of his secret private life and that of his official life. And the two do not jibe; to repeat a patient's phrase quoted in a previous chapter: "Life is awful; it is so full of reality!"

    No matter how averse the neurotic is to checking with evidence, reality inevitably obtrudes itself in two ways. He may be highly gifted, but he still is in all essentials like everybody else—with general human limitations and considerable individual difficulties to boot. His actual being does not jibe with his godlike image. Nor does the reality outside himself treat him as though it found him godlike. For him, too, an hour has but sixty minutes; he must wait in line, like everybody else; the taxi driver or the boss may act as though he were simply an ordinary mortal."
    Quadra complexes by Stratiyevskaya: Alpha - Closed Mouth | Beta - Subservience | Gamma - Tied Hands | Delta - Clipped Wings

    Gulenko's (very good) type descriptions
    Stratiyevskaya's type descriptions

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    This made me feel at peace.

    The Taoists have a famous teaching about an empty boat that rams into your boat in the middle of a river. While you probably wouldn’t be angry at an empty boat, you might well become enraged if someone were at its helm.
    The point of the story is that the parents who didn’t see you, the other kids who teased you as a child, the driver who aggressively tailgated you yesterday – are all, in fact, empty, rudderless boats. They were compulsively driven to act as they did by their own unexamined wounds, therefore they did not know what they were doing and had little control over it.

    Just as an empty boat that rams into us isn’t targeting us, so too people who act unkindly are driven along by the unconscious force of their own wounding and pain.


    Until we realize this, we will remain prisoners of our grievance, our past, and our victim identity, all of which keep us from opening to the more powerful currents of life and love that are always flowing through the present moment.


    — Claudia Azula Altucher
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chae View Post
    This made me feel at peace.

    The Taoists have a famous teaching about an empty boat that rams into your boat in the middle of a river. While you probably wouldn’t be angry at an empty boat, you might well become enraged if someone were at its helm.
    I've actually read about the same story in the Buddhist monk Matthieu Ricard's book... although I guess the interpretation of it is a little different. It says that the only reason you feel hurt is because of the illusion of the ego.

    We can see this crystallization of “I” and “mine” in many situations of daily life. You are napping peacefully in a boat in the middle of a lake. Another craft bumps into yours and wakes you with a start. Thinking that a clumsy or prankish boater has crashed into you, you leap up furious, ready to curse him out, only to find that the boat in question is empty. You laugh at your own mistake and return peaceably to your nap. The only difference between the two reactions is that in the first case, you’d thought yourself the target of someone’s malice, while in the second you realized that your “I” was not a target.

    Likewise, if someone punches you, your irritation will be long-lasting. But consider the physical pain — it fades quickly and is soon imperceptible. The only thing that continues to hurt is the ego’s wound. A friend of mine had come to Nepal from Hong Kong to attend some teachings. Thousands of people had gathered and were jam-packed on the floor of our monastery’s vast courtyard. As my friend was moving back and forth trying to seat herself a bit more comfortably, cross-legged on her cushion, someone punched her in the back. As she told me later: “I felt irritated for a whole hour. How could someone attending Buddhist teachings behave in such a rude and uncompassionate way toward me, who had come so far to receive these teachings! But after a while I realized that although my irritation had been long-lasting, the actual physical pain had faded quickly and had soon become imperceptible. The only thing that continued to hurt was my wounded ego! I had one minute of body pain and fifty-nine minutes of ego pain!” When we see the self as a mere concept and not as an autonomous entity that we must protect and satisfy at all costs, we react in completely different ways.

    Here is another example to illustrate our attachment to the idea of “mine.” You are looking at a beautiful porcelain vase in a shopwindow when a clumsy salesman knocks it over. “What a shame! Such a lovely vase!” you sigh, and continue calmly on your way. On the other hand, if you had just bought that vase and had placed it proudly on the mantle, only to see it fall and smash to smithereens, you would cry out in horror, “My vase is broken!” and be deeply affected by the accident. The sole difference is the label “my” that you had stuck to the vase.

    Ricard, Matthieu. The Art of Happiness: A Guide to Developing Life's Most Important Skill
    Quadra complexes by Stratiyevskaya: Alpha - Closed Mouth | Beta - Subservience | Gamma - Tied Hands | Delta - Clipped Wings

    Gulenko's (very good) type descriptions
    Stratiyevskaya's type descriptions

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    Of all the senses, touch is most linked to emotion and feeling. To be “touched” or “moved” by words or things implies the process of identification and separation by which we apprehend the world aesthetically. I have noted that we do not see our eyes when we see or hear our ears when we hear, but tactile perception involves perception of our own bodily state as we take in what is outside that state. The pressure involved in touch is a pressure on ourselves as well as on objects.
    — Susan Stewart, Poetry and the Fate of the Senses
    “As a general rule, people, even the wicked, are much more naïve and simple-hearted than we suppose. And we ourselves are, too.” — Fyodor Dostoyevsky, The Brothers Karamazov

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    The little girl’s sense of secrecy that developed at prepuberty only grows in importance. She closes herself up in fierce solitude: she refuses to reveal to those around her the hidden self that she considers to be her real self and that is in fact an imaginary character: she plays at being a dancer like Tolstoy’s Natasha, or a saint like Marie Leneru, or simply the singular wonder that is herself. There is still an enormous difference between this heroine and the objective face that her parents and friends recognise in her. She is also convinced that she is misunderstood: her relationship with herself becomes even more passionate: she becomes intoxicated with her isolation, feels different, superior, exceptional: she promises that the future will take revenge on the mediocrity of her present life. From this narrow and petty existence she escapes by dreams.
    — Simone de Beauvoir, The Second Sex, Vol II Chapter II: The Girl
    “As a general rule, people, even the wicked, are much more naïve and simple-hearted than we suppose. And we ourselves are, too.” — Fyodor Dostoyevsky, The Brothers Karamazov

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    Elmore Leonard's Ten Rules of Writing

    1. Never open a book with weather.
    2. Avoid prologues.
    3. Never use a verb other than "said" to carry dialogue.
    4. Never use an adverb to modify the verb "said”…he admonished gravely.
    5. Keep your exclamation points under control. You are allowed no more than two or three per 100,000 words of prose.
    6. Never use the words "suddenly" or "all hell broke loose."
    7. Use regional dialect, patois, sparingly.
    8. Avoid detailed descriptions of characters.
    9. Don't go into great detail describing places and things.
    10. Try to leave out the part that readers tend to skip.

    My most important rule is one that sums up the 10.

    If it sounds like writing, I rewrite it.
    I think he make some good points, even if I would probably consider myself far from full agreement.
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    What are the implications of claiming that the Earth is a planet? Copernicus did not discuss the question; but his successors were bound to. In the summer of 1583 a strange little Italian gave a series of lectures in Oxford.64 We know him as Giordano Bruno, but he liked to invent long names and titles for himself, names, it was said, longer than his body. The opening words of this letter of his provoked laughter:

    Philotheus Jordanus Brunus Nolanus, doctor of a more sophisticated theology, professor of a more pure and innocent wisdom, known to the best academies of Europe, a proven and honoured philosopher, a stranger only among barbarians and knaves, the awakener of sleeping spirits, the tamer of presumptuous and stubborn ignorance, who professes a general love of humanity in all his actions, who prefers as company neither Briton nor Italian, male nor female, bishop nor king, robe nor armour, friar nor layman, but only those whose conversation is more peaceable, more civil, more faithful, and more valuable, who respects not the anointed head, the signed forehead, the washed hands, or the circumcised penis, but rather the spirit and culture of mind (which can be read in the face of a real person); whom the propagators of stupidity and the small-time hypocrites detest, whom the sober and studious love, and whom the most noble minds acclaim, to the most excellent and illustrious vice-chancellor of the University of Oxford, many greetings.65

    When he walked to the lectern he rolled up his sleeves, as if he were a juggler about to perform a trick. As he spoke he bobbed and dipped like a dabchick or little grebe. He lectured, as all academics did, in Latin, but he spoke Latin with a Neapolitan pronunciation; the dons of Oxford (who found their own English pronunciation of Latin civilized and sophisticated) laughed at him for saying chentrum, chirculus and circumferenchia (which, as it happens, is now the approved pronunciation). But mostly they took exception to his Copernicanism. Twenty years later, George Abbott, who would eventually become Archbishop of Canterbury, remembered it as if it were yesterday: ‘he undertooke among very many other matters to set on foote the opinion of Copernicus, that the earth did goe round, and the heavens did stand still; wheras in truth it was his owne head which rather did run round, & his braines did not stand stil.’66

    It was forty years since Copernicus had published On the Revolutions. His new astronomy had certain evident advantages over the established astronomy of Ptolemy. According to Plato and Aristotle, all movement in the heavens should be circular and unchanging and, as we have seen, in the Renaissance there were still philosophers (such as Girolamo Fracastoro (1477–1553), the first to think seriously about contagious diseases) trying to construct a simple model of the universe which consisted of spheres nested around a common centre. But, try as they might, the philosophers could not get such models to fit what actually happens in the heavens. What Ptolemy had managed to achieve was a system that accurately predicted movements in the heavens. The Ptolemaic system, like those of Plato and Aristotle, claimed that the moon, the sun and all the planets circled around the earth. But in order to predict accurately the movement of these heavenly bodies it employed a complex system of deferents (circles), epicycles (circles on circles), eccentrics (circles rotating around a displaced centre) and equants. The equant was a device for speeding up and slowing down the movement of a body in the heavens by measuring its movement not from the centre of a circle but from another point. By this means the movement could be described (or misdescribed) as constant; it was thus a method of cheating on the fundamental principle insisted on by the philosophers that heavenly movement should be circular and unchanging. (For strict Aristotelians, even the epicycle was a cheat, as they wanted all the circular movements to have a common centre.)

    Copernicus proposed to abolish the equant, and to eliminate an epicycle for each planet further from the sun than the Earth by showing how the movement of the Earth created an apparent movement in the sky equivalent to an epicycle. Copernicus also claimed that his system was preferable because it specified more tightly the characteristics of the system as a whole. Ptolemaic philosophers had never been sure, for example, whether Venus or the sun was closer to the earth (the right answer, in our terms, being that sometimes it is one, and sometimes the other, but this was an unacceptable answer within the Ptolemaic system), while Copernicus’s system placed the heavenly bodies in a fixed order.67

    It used to be thought that Copernicus initiated an intellectual revolution – indeed Thomas Kuhn called his first book The Copernican Revolution (1957). But in this Kuhn was mistaken. Throughout Europe astronomers took a keen interest in what Copernicus had to say, but, with only a very few exceptions, they took it for granted that his account of a moving Earth was simply wrong. If the earth moved, we would be aware of it; you would feel the wind in your face. If you dropped an object from a tall tower, it would fall towards the west. If you fired a cannon to the west, the ball would go further than if you fired it to the east. Since none of these things happened, all the leading astronomers – Erasmus Reinhold (1511–53), Michael Maestlin (1550–1631), Tycho Brahe (1546–1601), Christoph Clavius (1538–1612) and Giovanni Magini (1555–1617) – were confident that Copernicus was wrong. Still, they were fascinated by the simplicity of his techniques for calculation, and thrilled at the idea that it might be possible to junk the equant. In an extraordinary labour of love, every surviving copy of the first (1543) and the second (1566) editions of On the Revolutions has now been studied to identify the marginal comments written by its first readers, with the result that we can tell very reliably what they liked and what they disliked, what they found credible and what they found incredible.68 They liked Copernicanism as a mathematical device; they had no time for it as scientific truth. They read it as the prefatory letter (now known to have been written by Osiander, and added without Copernicus’s permission) encouraged them to read it, as a purely hypothetical construction.

    In 1583 there were, as far as we know, only three competent astronomers in the whole of Europe who accepted Copernicus’s claim that the Earth travelled around the sun: in Germany, Christoph Rothmann (who did not publish, and eventually abandoned Copernicanism); in Italy, Giovanni Benedetti (who published a few sentences on the question in 1585); and, in England, Thomas Digges (who had published in support of Copernicanism in 1576).xii So it must have simply astonished the dons of Oxford to hear this peculiar Italian, as he dipped and dodged, chucked and chirred, defending Copernicanism as the literal truth.

    We do not know how far Bruno got in his exposition of Copernicanism. He was stopped after he had given three lectures; he was accused of merely reciting passages from the Renaissance Platonist philosopher Ficino (who had written in praise of the sun), while giving the impression that the words were his own. This is quite possible – Bruno does similar things in his published texts and, as we have seen, the concept of plagiarism was a novel one.xiii But we know what Bruno wanted to say because, after he was driven out of Oxford, he took refuge with the French ambassador in London, and there he set about writing a series of works, of which the most famous is The Ash Wednesday Supper, in defence of his position.69 In the course of eighteen months Bruno published six books in London, all of them written in Italian.xiv Before and after his time in England, Bruno published only in Latin (with the solitary exception of a play, Il candelaio, published in Paris in 1582), so his choice of Italian, when his books must have mainly been sold to Englishmen (though some will have been carried to the great book fair in Frankfurt), seems odd. But Italian was the language of Dante and of Petrarch. Educated Englishmen could read it; by using it, Bruno signalled that he was addressing himself to poets and courtiers, not to professors of mathematics or philosophy.

    The English were hostile to foreigners and to Catholics. If you were too obviously foreign, as Bruno was, you risked being beaten up in the street. Bruno hardly dared venture outdoors. In the dialogues he wrote he describes himself as mixing with the elite of English society, but he later claimed this was fiction not fact.70 Still, his books must have sold, or his printer would have stopped printing them. Bruno himself was penniless, and astonished to see that the dons of Oxford wore great, jewelled rings on their fingers – we can be sure there were none on his – so he cannot have been providing his printer with a subsidy.

    These books mark a true revolution. Copernicus had described a spherical universe with the sun at its centre. He had acknowledged that it might be possible to conceive of an infinite universe, but he had refused to pursue that line of thought, saying, ‘Let us therefore leave the question whether the universe is finite or infinite to be discussed by the natural philosophers’ (Copernicus himself being a mathematician, not a philosopher).71 Bruno seized on Copernicanism to argue for an infinite and eternal universe. The stars, he said, were suns, and the sun a star: here he was following not Copernicus but Aristarchus of Samos (310–230 BCE). Thus there could be other inhabited planets in the universe; even the sun and the stars might be inhabited, for they could not be equally hot all over, and there might be creatures, quite different from ourselves, who thrive on heat. Moreover, there was nothing to show that the other planets were different from the Earth. Bruno argued that the moon and the planets could be presumed to have continents and oceans, and that they shone, not by their own light (as was generally assumed; even the moon was assumed to be translucent at least), but solely by reflected light.72 Thus, seen from the moon, the Earth would look like a gigantic moon; seen from even further away, it would be a bright star in the sky. The Earth, Bruno thought, would shine brightly because the seas would reflect more light than the land. (Here, as Galileo later showed, he was wrong – which is why when astronomers, after the discovery of the telescope, began to make maps of the moon they named the dark patches, not the light patches, seas.) Thus Bruno imagined an infinite universe, with numberless stars and planets, all possibly inhabited by extraterrestrial life forms.73 Since Bruno did not believe that Christ was the saviour of mankind (he was a sort of pantheist), he did not have to worry about how the Christian drama of sin and salvation was played out in this infinity of worlds.

    Bruno was not the first to imagine an infinite universe with extraterrestrial life. Nicholas of Cusa, in his On Learned Ignorance (1440), had argued that only an infinite universe was appropriate for an infinite God. Nicholas thought the earth was a heavenly body which from a distance would shine like a star, an idea which caught Montaigne’s attention.74 But Nicholas assumed that the earth and the sun were similar bodies. A habitable world was, Nicholas thought, hidden behind the shining visible surface of the sun; as for the earth, it, like the sun, was surrounded by a fiery mantle which was invisible to us, and which you would see only if you viewed the earth from outer space. Thus Nicholas made the earth into a heavenly body, but simultaneously he made the sun into a terrestrial one.xvBruno, by contrast, was the first to distinguish stars and planets as we do now, making the sun a star and the planets, including the Earth, dark bodies shining by reflected light.

    Bruno tried to resolve the standard arguments against Copernicanism by adopting the principles of the relativity of location and of movement; in his universe (unlike in those of Aristotle and Ptolemy) there was no up or down, no centre or periphery, no left and right and no way of telling if one was moving or stationary except by comparison with other objects.xvi Oresme and Copernicus had adopted the principle of the relativity of movement when considering two bodies, the sun and the earth – the movement of the sun that we perceive can equally be caused by the sun moving or the Earth turning – but they had not extended the argument to the more complicated circumstances considered by Bruno. Thus, Bruno argued, you can be in the cabin of a ship sailing across a calm sea and be quite incapable of telling whether you are moving or stationary; and if you throw something straight up in the air, it falls back into your hand, it doesn’t drift backwards towards the stern of the ship as the ship moves on.75 And Copernicus’s universe had a centre; he could not imagine (or at least could not acknowledge the possibility of) a universe in which location was purely relative. Bruno also made some radical and ill-judged alterations to the Copernican system, designed in part to eliminate basic objections to it (such as that Mars and Venus should greatly change in size if they are sometimes quite near and sometimes very far from the Earth).76

    In 1585 Bruno’s host, the French ambassador, was withdrawn from England, and Bruno had no choice but to leave with him. He wandered around Europe (carrying with him his copy of Copernicus, which is now in the Biblioteca Casanatense in Rome), and in 1592 he was arrested in Venice and handed over to the Roman Inquisition. After eight years of solitary confinement in the dark, and after prolonged torture, he was burnt alive in one of the main squares of Rome, the Campo de’ Fiori, on 17 February 1600. He had refused to recant his heresies, including his belief in other inhabited worlds.xvii His books were banned throughout Catholic Europe.

    Bruno is important to our story not because he was brave (though he was), or brilliant (though he was), but because he was, on occasion, right. Bruno’s revisions to, and misunderstandings of, Copernicus were misconceived. The infinite and eternal universe theory has been replaced, in the course of the last fifty years, by the Big Bang theory (so recent that it was named only in 1949).77 But we now know that the sun is a star, that other stars have planets, and there is every reason to think that there is life elsewhere in the universe. We are not at the centre of the universe: rather, the Earth is just another planet. Bruno would find himself more at home in our universe than would Cardinal Bellarmine, the man who played the key role in his trial, as he played the key role in the Catholic Church’s condemnation of Copernicanism in 1616. On crucial points Bruno was right before anyone else: he was the first to say in print that the preface to On the Revolutions was not by Copernicus, and he was the first modern to insist that the planets shine by reflected light.xviii

    ~ The Invention of Science: The Scientific Revolution from 1500 to 1750 by David Wootton

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    [...] Einstein is a twentieth-century icon. He was once asked to stage his own three-week show at the London Palladium. Women fainted in his presence. Young girls mobbed him in Geneva. Today this sort of adulation is reserved for pop singers and movie stars. But in the aftermath of the First World War, Einstein became the first superstar of science when in 1919 the bending of light predicted by his theory of general relativity was confirmed. Little had changed when in January 1931, during a lecture tour of America, Einstein attended the premiere of Charlie Chaplin's movie City Limits in Los Angeles. A large crowd cheered wildly when they saw Chaplin and Einstein. 'They cheer me because they all understand me,' Chaplin told Einstein, 'and they cheer you because no one understands you.
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    On 10th May 1940, Winston Churchill became Prime Minister, the day Germany invaded France. His son Randolph came to Downing St and found him nearly naked shaving in a silk undershirt:
    "'Sit down, dear boy, and read the papers while I finish.' After two minutes, he turned and said: 'I think I see my way through.' He resumed shaving. I was astounded and said: 'Do you mean we can avoid defeat?' (which seemed credible) or 'beat the bastards?' (which seemed incredible). He flung his razor in the basin, swung around, and said: 'Of course I mean we can beat them.'
    'I'm all for it, but I don't see how you can.'
    He dried and sponged his face and turning round to me, said with great intensity: 'I shall the drag the United States in.'"
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    When Freud visited me in Zurich in 1908, I demonstrated the case of Babette to him. Afterward he said to me, "You know, Jung, what you have found out about this patient is certainly interesting. But how in the world were you able to bear spending hours and says with this phenomenally ugly female?"

    haha what a dick
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    Hitta: sticky elastic external persona... strong core
    Hitta: or a bukkake girl

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    As discussed in the preceding few entries, the fate of the universe is unknown, and some theories posit the continual creation of universes that “bud” from our own. However, let’s focus on our own universe. One possibility is that our universe will continue to expand forever, and particles will become increasingly sparse. This seems like a sad end, doesn’t it? However, even in this empty universe, quantum mechanics tells us that residual energy fields will have random fluctuations. Particles will spring out of the vacuum as if out of nowhere. Usually, this activity is small, and large fluctuations are rare. But particles do emerge, and given a long amount of time, something big is bound to appear, for example, a hydrogen atom, or even a small molecule like ethylene, H2C=CH2. This may seem unimpressive, but if our future is infinite, we can wait a long time, and almost anything could pop into existence. Most of the gunk that emerges will be an amorphous mess, but every now and then, a tiny number of ants, planets, people, or Jupiter-sized brains made from gold will emerge. Given an infinite amount of time, you will reappear, according to physicist Katherine Freese. Quantum resurrection may await all of us. Be happy.

    Today, serious researchers even contemplate the universe being overrun by Boltzmann Brains—naked, free-floating brains in outer space. Of course, the Boltzmann Brains are highly improbable objects, and there is virtually no chance that one has appeared in the 13.7 billion years our universe has existed. According to one calculation by physicist Tom Banks, the probability of thermal fluctuations producing a brain is e to the power of −1025. However, given an infinitely large space existing for an infinitely long time, these spooky conscious observers spring into existence. Today, there is a growing literature on the implications of Boltzmann Brains, kick-started by a 2002 publication by researchers Lisa Dyson, Matthew Kleban, and Leonard Susskind that seemed to imply that the typical intelligent observer may arise through thermal fluctuations, rather than cosmology and evolution.
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    We live in an increasingly united world. The boundaries that once existed between peoples are steadily dissolving; ancient divisions between tribes and families, villages and parishes, even between nations, are everywhere disintegrating. The nation-state, with which most of the peoples of the Western world have lived since the seventeenth century, may yet have a long time to live. But it is becoming increasingly hard to see it as the political order of the future. For thousands of years, few people went more than thirty miles from their place of birth. (This, it has been calculated from the places mentioned in the Gospels, is roughly the farthest Jesus Christ ever traveled from his home, and, in this respect, at least, he was not exceptional.) Today places that less than a century ago were remote, inaccessible, and dangerous have become little more than tourist sites. Today most of us in the Western world will travel hundreds, often thousands, of miles in our immensely prolonged lives. And in the process we will, inevitably, bump up against different peoples with different beliefs, wearing different clothes and holding different views. Some three hundred years ago, when the process we now label “globalization” was just beginning, it was hoped that this bumping into others, this forced recognition of all the differences that exist in the world, would smooth away the rough edges most humans acquire early in life, making them, in the process, more “polished” and “polite”—as it was called in the eighteenth century—more familiar with the preferences of others, more tolerant of their beliefs and delusions, and thus better able to live in harmony with one another.
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    The Garden of Eden is always painted as a lush and sultry place. From biology's point of view, too, the tropics are a great and ancient city, with more inhabitants, more energy, more water, more production and, because the land has not been wiped clean by glaciers, more time for specialists to evolve than in the icy north and south. A fifth of all the world's kinds of plant are found on a two hundredth of its land. Such centers of origin are tropical, in Madagascar, Malaysia or Central America. Arctic Canada possesses ten kinds of ant, compared to two thousand in the same area of tropical South America; and Hong Kong, at four hundred square miles, has more kinds of birds, mammals, insects and plants than the whole of the British Isles.
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