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Thread: great paragraphs from what you're reading

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    As Randy was getting out of the train, a small urgent man elbowed him sharply in the ribs and grabbed his wallet. Randy got hold of the wallet and pulled it free of the pickpocket, only to drop it on the street next to the train car steps. As Randy bent over to pick it up, a fat woman's wobbly ass farted horribly in his face, and a dacoit's dirty bare foot stepped on his wrist. The train conductor rang his bell and screamed for Randy to stand clear of the train steps, insultingly calling him a honkie-wallah. The humid air was unbelievably foul; the tropical summer sun felt heavy as a sheet of hot metal; and several ruppe notes were missing from Randy's wallet.
    Last edited by bg; 11-20-2011 at 10:20 AM.

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    Everything tells me that I am about to make a wrong decision, but making mistakes is just part of life. What does the world want of me? Does it want me to take no risks, to go back to where I came from because I didn't have the courage to say "yes" to life?
    Looking for an Archnemesis. Willing applicants contact via PM.

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    The second salient feature of the technocratic utopia— and a logical consequence of the approach described above— is that society is ruled by the masters of technology and by scientists (this is what makes it possible to call this type of Utopia “technocratic”). The result is a latter-day version of a Utopian society headed by a wise ruler; the only difference is that he is a technocrat, not a humanitarian philosopher.

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    The Colchine was obtained through a chemist friend of mine and the Trifluralin from a farmer who had 20 lt or 5 gallons of it. The Trifluralin solution was 0.013% and it was applied to the seedling terminal bud at the cotyledon leaf stage, put into a humidity chamber for 24hrs and then rinsed off with tap water.

    I read shit like this all the time. I have horticultural journals and yearly book additions dating all the way back to the 1800s. There is no point in posting more, other than to show that I don't read fiction. I have read reference books since I was a kid. By the time I was 10, I had read my mom's entire library of nursing/medicine/psychology. I was made the Biology Aide in 7th grade because I had already read my brother's stolen (he failed to return his book lol) 10th grade biology book 3 times over. However, I cannot concentrate or hold still if I try to read fiction. It is like pure misery for me. However, I have learned calligraphy and poetry. I do not like reading it, but I love making both.

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    “It is true that there is this loss from machinery lying idle in those manufactories in which work only goes on by day. But the use of furnaces would involve a further loss in our case. If they were kept up there would be a waste of fuel (instead of, as now, a waste of the living substance of the workers), and if they were not, there would be loss of time in laying the fires and getting the heat up (whilst the loss of sleeping time, even to children of 8 is a gain of working-time for the Sanderson tribe), and the furnaces themselves would suffer from the changes of temperature.” (Whilst those same furnaces suffer nothing from the day and night change of labour.)
    „Man can do what he wants but he cannot want what he wants.“
    – Arthur Schopenhauer

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    18. "Sincerity is the way of Heaven. The attainment of sincerity is the way of men. He who possesses sincerity is he who, without an effort, hits what is right, and apprehends, without the exercise of thought;-- he is the sage who naturally and easily embodies the right way. He who attains to sincerity is he who chooses what is good, and firmly holds it fast.

    19. "To this attainment there are requisite the extensive study of what is good, accurate inquiry about it, careful reflection on it, the clear discrimination of it, and the earnest practice of it.

    20. "The superior man, while there is anything he has not studied, or while in what he has studied there is anything he cannot understand, Will not intermit his labor. While there is anything he has not inquired about, or anything in what he has inquired about which he does not know, he will not intermit his labor. While there is anything which he has not reflected on, or anything in what he has reflected on which he does not apprehend, he will not intermit his labor. While there is anything which he has not discriminated or his discrimination is not clear, he will not intermit his labor. If there be anything which he has not practiced, or his practice fails in earnestness, he will not intermit his labor.

    If another man succeed by one effort, he will use a hundred efforts. If another man succeed by ten efforts, he will use a thousand.

    21. "Let a man proceed in this way, and, though dull, he will surely become intelligent; though weak, he will surely become strong."


    ~The Doctrine of the Mean~

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    Quote Originally Posted by felafel View Post
    ^ i was gonna post from the book i'm reading but decided against it coz it was way too similar to what you posted. weird.
    Well, great minds think alike.

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    Subterranean lit a match. The empty house looked the same as always. Awash in a sea of memories, he slipped into his worn slippers and padded down the tiles. Steps echoing, he paused to stuff down a jack in the box with dark curly hair that screamed nasally "Type me, type me bitch!" Shaking his head at the obscenity, Subterranean resumed his path to the kitchen. Low blue lights illuminated pictures of a shy, gangly boy, and then gradually, his progression to a shy, gangly man. The man shook his head. The shadows were always entirely too friendly every time he tried to get a decent headshot.

    Tapping on his candle as if to dispel the darkness in his heart, Subterranean pushed open a door to reveal a low white kitchen with a checkered cloth covering a well worn wooden table. He strode to the table and removed the contents of his bag with the utmost care. Gathering his ingredients, he sliced whole wheat bread, slathered it with mayonnaise, and was just about to spoon the watery contents of canned tuna on top of it when he heard a voice.

    "GAY!" the voice said. "GAY GAY GAY!"

    Subterranean whirled around. There, sitting on his counter top, was a young man. The man was dressed in pink and purple and had an aura of indecent belligerence about him.

    (=p =p =p)
    Raver: You're misunderstood BnD, you present depth in a shallow way.

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    Big Sister IS watchIng me Sleep HERO's Avatar
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    In the same decade in which writers are discovering the emotional importance of childhood and are unmasking the devastating consequences of the way power is secretly exercised under the disguise of child-rearing, students of psychology are spending four years at the universities learning to regard human beings as machines in order to gain a better understanding of how they function. When we consider how much time and energy is devoted during these best years to wasting the last opportunities of adolescence and to suppressing, by means of the intellectual disciplines, the feelings that emerge with particular force at this age, then it is no wonder that the people who have made this sacrifice victimize their patients and clients in turn, treating them as mere objects of knowledge instead of as autonomous, creative beings. There are some authors of so-called objective, scientific publications in the field of psychology who remind me of the officer in Kafka’s Penal Colony in their zeal and their consistent self-destructiveness. In the unsuspecting, trusting attitude of Kafka’s convicted prisoner, on the other hand, we can see the students of today who are so eager to believe that the only thing that counts in their four years of study is their academic performance and that human commitment is not required.
    The expressionistic painters and poets active at the beginning of [the 20th] century demonstrated more understanding of the neuroses of their day (or at any rate unconsciously imparted more imformation about them) than did the contemporary professors of psychiatry. During the same period, Freud’s female patients with their hysterical symptoms were unconsciously reenacting their childhood traumata. He succeeded in deciphering their language, which their conventional doctors had failed to understand. In return, he reaped not only gratitude but also hostility, because he had dared to touch upon the taboos of his time.
    Children who become too aware of things are punished for it and internalize the coercion to such an extent that as adults they give up the search for awareness. But because some people cannot renounce this search in spite of coercion, there is justifiable hope that regardless of the ever-increasing application of technology to the field of psychological knowledge, Kafka’s vision of the penal colony with its efficient, scientifically minded persecutors and their passive victims is valid only for certain areas of our life and perhaps not forever. For the human soul is virtually indestructible, and its ability to rise from the ashes remains as long as the body draws breath.
    “All faith has been already lost; hope seems a useless deceit; thought is paling and disappearing; the divine fire has left it; society has lost its sense of direction and in cold despair senses an abyss ahead of it and is ready to topple into it. Life is suffocating through lack of a goal. The future offers nothing; one must demand everything from the present, one must fill one’s life only with the necessities of the moment. Everything passes into the body, everything is used up in physical debauchery, and in order to compensate for the higher spiritual impressions which are lacking, people aggravate their nerves, their whole body with whatever is capable of arousing sensations. The most monstrous perversions, the most abnormal phenomena, gradually are taken for granted.” — Fyodor Dostoyevsky


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    Quote Originally Posted by Jadae View Post
    The Colchine was obtained through a chemist friend of mine and the Trifluralin from a farmer who had 20 lt or 5 gallons of it. The Trifluralin solution was 0.013% and it was applied to the seedling terminal bud at the cotyledon leaf stage, put into a humidity chamber for 24hrs and then rinsed off with tap water.

    I read shit like this all the time. I have horticultural journals and yearly book additions dating all the way back to the 1800s. There is no point in posting more, other than to show that I don't read fiction. I have read reference books since I was a kid. By the time I was 10, I had read my mom's entire library of nursing/medicine/psychology. I was made the Biology Aide in 7th grade because I had already read my brother's stolen (he failed to return his book lol) 10th grade biology book 3 times over. However, I cannot concentrate or hold still if I try to read fiction. It is like pure misery for me. However, I have learned calligraphy and poetry. I do not like reading it, but I love making both.
    Looks like you were amassing facts (Te).
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    Dual type (as per tcaudilllg)
    Enneagram 2w1sw(1w9) helps others to live up to their own standards of what a good person is and is very behind the scenes in the process.
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    I'm constantly looking to align the real with the ideal.I've been more oriented toward being overly idealistic by expecting the real to match the ideal. My thinking side is dominent. The result is that sometimes I can be overly impersonal or self-centered in my approach, not being understanding of others in the process and simply thinking "you should do this" or "everyone should follor this rule"..."regardless of how they feel or where they're coming from"which just isn't a good attitude to have. It is a way, though, to give oneself an artificial sense of self-justification. LSE

    Best description of functions:
    http://socionicsstudy.blogspot.com/2...functions.html

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    Artha is the acquisition of arts, land, gold, cattle, wealth, equipages, and friends. It is also the protection of what is acquired and the increase of what is protected. Artha should be learned from the king's officers, and from merchants who may be versed in the way of commerce.
    Kama is the enjoyment of appropriate objects by the five senses of hearing, feeling, seeing, tasting, and smelling, assisted by the mind together with the soul. The ingredient in this is a peculiar contact between the organ of sense and its object and the consciousness of pleasure that arises from that contact is called Kama.

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    Yes, Youth was the Nemesis. It destroyed the old uns and recked not that, in so doing, it destroyed itself. It enlarged its arteries and smashed its knuckles, and was in turn destroyed by Youth. For Youth was ever youthful. It was only Age that grew old.
    I would say that ethically you are still supposed to act as if you have unilateral responsibility; but simultaneously you have to be able to see the other as a fully autonomous, free, aware person.

    Medicalizing social problems has the additional benefit of rendering society not responsible for those social ills. If it’s a disease, it’s nobody’s fault. Yay empiricism.

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    Glorious Member mu4's Avatar
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    “The laws of history are as absolute as the laws of physics, and if the probabilities of error are greater, it is only because history does not deal with as many humans as physics does atoms, so that individual variations count for more.”
    ― Isaac Asimov, Foundation and Empire

    “Pyscho-history dealt not with man, but with man-masses. It was the science of mobs; mobs in their billions. It could forecast reactions to stimuli with something of the accuracy that a lesser science could bring to the forecast of a rebound of a billiard ball. The reaction of one man could be forecast by no known mathematics; the reaction of a billion is something else again.”
    ― Isaac Asimov, Foundation and Empire

    “Every vice of the Empire has been repeated in the Foundation. Inertia! Our ruling class knows one law; no
    change. Despotism! They know one rule; force. Maldistribution! They know one desire; to hold what is
    theirs.”
    ― Isaac Asimov, Foundation and Empire
    The mind a killing weapon
    The heart an open wound

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    “...all the suffering that humanity ever knew can be traced to the one fact that no man in the history of the Galaxy, until Hari Seldon, and very few men thereafter, could really understand one another. Every human being lived behind an impenetrable wall of choking mist within which no other but he existed. Occasionally there were the dim signals from deep within the cavern in which another man was located - so that each might grope toward the other. Yet because they did not know one another, and could not understand one another, and dared not trust one another, and felt from infancy the terrors and insecurity of that ultimate isolation - there was the hunted fear of man for man, the savage rapacity of man toward man.”
    ― Isaac Asimov, Second Foundation

    “In all the known history of Mankind, advances have been made primarily in physical technology; in the capacity of handling the inanimate world about Man. Control of self and society has been left to to chance or to the vague gropings of intuitive ethical systems based on inspiration and emotion. As a result no culture of greater stability than about fifty-five percent has ever existed, and these only as the result of great human misery.”
    ― Isaac Asimov, Second Foundation
    The mind a killing weapon
    The heart an open wound

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    Glorious Member mu4's Avatar
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    I’ve lived most of my life already and I suppose I can argue myself into believing that I have no great cause to love humanity. However, only a few people have hurt me, and if I hurt everyone in return that is unconscionable usury.
    The Gods Themselves Section 3, Chapter 12, p. 250 Isaac Asimov
    The mind a killing weapon
    The heart an open wound

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    "The key thought in the preceding few lines is the article of faith that this pattern cannot merely be a coincidence. A mathematician who finds a pattern of this sort will instinctively ask, “Why? What is the reason behind this order?” Not only will all mathematicians wonder what the reason is, but even more importantly, they will all implicitly believe that whether or not anyone ever finds the reason, there must be a reason for it. Nothing happens “by accident” in the world of mathematics. The existence of a perfect pattern, a regularity that goes on forever, reveals — just as smoke reveals a fire —that something is going on behind the scenes."
    —"I am a strange loop", D.Hofstadter
    ipsa scientia potestas est-adaequatio intellectus et rei

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    Started rereading this last night.

    “There is no such thing as pure good or pure evil, least of all in people. In the best of us there are thoughts or deeds that are wicked, and in the worst of us, at least some virtue. An adversary is not one who does loathsome acts for their own sake. He always has a reason that to him is justification. My cat eats mice. Does that make him bad? I don't think so, and the cat doesn't think so, but I would bet the mice have a different opinion.”

    "Something inexpressively lovely and wonderful advances through the crystal, nearer, nearer. And, oh, inexpressively terrifying. For if it were to touch you, if it were to seize you and engulf you, you'd die; all the regular, habitual daily part of you would die … one would have to begin living arduously in the quiet, arduously in some strange, unheard of manner."


     






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    Giovanni placed himself before me again and began wiping the bar with a damp cloth. "The Americans are funny. You have a funny sense of time - or perhaps you have no sense of time at all, I can't tell. Time always sounds like a parade chez-vous - a triumphant parade, like armies with banners entering a town. As though, with enough time, and that would not need be so very much for Americans, n'est-ce pas?" and he smiled, giving me a mocking look, but I said nothing. "Well then", he continued, "as though with enough time and all that fearful energy and virtue you people have, everything will be settled, solved, put in its place. And when I say everything", he added, grimly, "I mean all the serious, dreadful things like pain and death and love, in which you Americans do not believe."

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    "Ah! why have you called me to life? I felt for a moment as though the heavy burden of the flesh was leaving me; my soul had broken the crystal which held it captive; it pervaded my whole being; the cold silence of material things had ceased; all things in nature had a voice and spoke to me. The old church was luminous. It's arched roof, brilliant with gold and azure like those of an Italian cathedral, sparkled above my head. Melodies such as the angels sang to martyrs, quieting their pains, sounded from the organ. The rough pavements of Havre seemed to my feet a flowery mead; the sea spoke to me with a voice of sympathy, like an old friend whom I had never truly understood. I saw clearly how the roses in my garden had long adored me and bidden me love; they lifted their heads and smiled as I came back from church. I heard your name, "Melchior," chiming in the flower-bells; I saw it written on the clouds. Yes, yes, I live, I am living, thanks to thee,—my poet, more beautiful than that cold, conventional Lord Byron, with a face as dull as the English climate. One glance of thine, thine Orient glance, pierced through my double veil and sent thy blood to my heart, and from thence to my head and feet. Ah! that is not the life our mother gave us. A hurt to thee would hurt me too at the very instant it was given,—my life exists by thy thought only. I know now the purpose of the divine faculty of music; the angels invented it to utter love. Ah, my Melchior, to have genius and to have beauty is too much; a man should be made to choose between them at his birth.


    When I think of the treasures of tenderness and affection which you have given me, and more especially for the last month, I ask myself if I dream. No, but you hide some mystery; what woman can yield you up to me and not die? Ah! jealousy has entered my heart with love,—love in which I could not have believed. How could I have imagined so mighty a conflagration? And now—strange and inconceivable revulsion!—I would rather you were ugly."

    "Something inexpressively lovely and wonderful advances through the crystal, nearer, nearer. And, oh, inexpressively terrifying. For if it were to touch you, if it were to seize you and engulf you, you'd die; all the regular, habitual daily part of you would die … one would have to begin living arduously in the quiet, arduously in some strange, unheard of manner."


     






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    "Help!" cries the recorded Comeno voice. "Help in the name of the Oversoul!"

    It is the ultimate appeal; the Advisers raise their distinguished heads, tensely attending to the alien accents.

    "Help us or we die- and others, many others, after us. We have been attacked by an unknown alien race, who descend upon our colonies and capture, murder, and enslave us by torturing our children. Every World they touch on is captured or extinguished. It has taken us years and lives to contrive to send this message. When you receive it we may be gone, too. The attackers are infiltrating around the east end of the River, from the south. They are repugnant in aspect, and call themselves the Zhumans or Zhumanor."

    "In the name of the Harmony, send help to wipe out these monsters, even if we die with them. Death is better than life under their rule. They will not stop with us."


    (I cheated)
    Last edited by bg; 07-30-2015 at 11:19 PM.

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    But quite aside from the fact that man has never yet conquered Nature in anything, but at most has caught hold of and tried to lift one or another corner of her immense gigantic veil of eternal riddles and secrets, that in reality he invents nothing but only discovers everything, that he does not dominate Nature, but has only risen on the basis of his knowledge of various laws and secrets of Nature to be lord over those other living creatures who lack this knowledge - quite aside from all this, an idea cannot overcome the preconditions for the development and being of humanity, since the idea itself depends only on man. Without human beings there is no human idea in this world, therefore the idea as such is always conditioned by the presence of human beings and hence of all the laws which created the precondition for their existence.

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    "Well," - Cornelius at last broke the silence, - "well, Rosa, everything changes in the realm of nature; the flowers of spring are succeeded by other flowers; and the bees, which so tenderly caressed the violets and the wall-flowers, will flutter with just as much love about the honey-suckles, the rose, the jessamine, and the carnation."

    "What does all this mean?" asked Rosa.

    "You have abandoned me, Miss Rosa, to seek your pleasure elsewhere. You have done well, and I will not complain. What claim have I to your fidelity?"

    "My fidelity!" Rosa exclaimed, with her eyes full of tears, and without caring any longer to hide from Cornelius this dew of pearls dropping on her cheeks, "my fidelity! have I not been faithful to you?"

    "Do you call it faithful to desert me, and to leave me here to die?"

    "But, Mynheer Cornelius," said Rosa, "am I not doing everything for you that could give you pleasure? have I not devoted myself to your tulip?"

    "You are bitter, Rosa, you reproach me with the only unalloyed pleasure which I have had in this world."

    "I reproach you with nothing, Mynheer Cornelius, except, perhaps, with the intense grief which I felt when people came to tell me at the Buytenhof that you were about to be put to death."

    "You are displeased, Rosa, my sweet girl, with my loving flowers."

    "I am not displeased with your loving them, Mynheer Cornelius, only it makes me sad to think that you love them better than you do me."

    "Oh, my dear, dear Rosa! look how my hands tremble; look at my pale cheek, hear how my heart beats. It is for you, my love, not for the black tulip. Destroy the bulb, destroy the germ of that flower, extinguish the gentle light of that innocent and delightful dream, to which I have accustomed myself; but love me, Rosa, love me; for I feel deeply that I love but you."

    "Yes, after the black tulip," sighed Rosa, who at last no longer coyly withdrew her warm hands from the grating, as Cornelius most affectionately kissed them.

    "Above and before everything in this world, Rosa."

    "May I believe you?"

    "As you believe in your own existence."

    "Well, then, be it so; but loving me does not bind you too much."

    "Unfortunately, it does not bind me more than I am bound; but it binds you, Rosa, you."

    "To what?"

    "First of all, not to marry."

    She smiled.

    "That's your way," she said; "you are tyrants all of you. You worship a certain beauty, you think of nothing but her. Then you are condemned to death, and whilst walking to the scaffold, you devote to her your last sigh; and now you expect poor me to sacrifice to you all my dreams and my happiness."

    "But who is the beauty you are talking of, Rosa?" said Cornelius, trying in vain to remember a woman to whom Rosa might possibly be alluding.

    "The dark beauty with a slender waist, small feet, and a noble head; in short, I am speaking of your flower."

    Cornelius smiled.

    "That is an imaginary lady love, at all events; whereas, without counting that amorous Jacob, you by your own account are surrounded with all sorts of swains eager to make love to you. Do you remember Rosa, what you told me of the students, officers, and clerks of the Hague? Are there no clerks, officers, or students at Loewestein?"

    "Indeed there are, and lots of them."

    "Who write letters?"

    "They do write."

    "And now, as you know how to read - - "

    Here Cornelius heaved a sigh at the thought, that, poor captive as he was, to him alone Rosa owed the faculty of reading the love-letters which she received.

    "As to that," said Rosa, "I think that in reading the notes addressed to me, and passing the different swains in review who send them to me, I am only following your instructions."

    "How so? My instructions?"

    "Indeed, your instructions, sir," said Rosa, sighing in her turn; "have you forgotten the will written by your hand on the Bible of Cornelius de Witt? I have not forgotten it; for now, as I know how to read, I read it every day over and over again. In that will you bid me to love and marry a handsome young man of twenty-six or eight years. I am on the look-out for that young man, and as the whole of my day is taken up with your tulip, you must needs leave me the evenings to find him."

    "But, Rosa, the will was made in the expectation of death, and, thanks to Heaven, I am still alive."

    "Well, then, I shall not be after the handsome young man, and I shall come to see you."

    "That's it, Rosa, come! come!"

    "Under one condition."

    "Granted beforehand!"

    "That the black tulip shall not be mentioned for the next three days."

    "It shall never be mentioned any more, if you wish it, Rosa."

    "No, no," the damsel said, laughing, "I will not ask for impossibilities."

    "Something inexpressively lovely and wonderful advances through the crystal, nearer, nearer. And, oh, inexpressively terrifying. For if it were to touch you, if it were to seize you and engulf you, you'd die; all the regular, habitual daily part of you would die … one would have to begin living arduously in the quiet, arduously in some strange, unheard of manner."


     






  24. #24
    Queen of the Damned Aylen's Avatar
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    "In later life I have met people born to wealth who, never having wanted for anything, had never even heard this problem in the rule of three: A young man is to crime as a five-franc piece is to X.—These gilded idiots say to me, 'Why did you get into debt? Why did you involve yourself in such onerous obligations?' They remind me of the princess who, on hearing that the people lacked bread, said, 'Why do not they buy cakes?' I should like to see one of these rich men, who complain that I charge too much for an operation,—yes, I should like to see him alone in Paris without a sou, without a friend, without credit, and forced to work with his five fingers to live at all! What would he do? Where would he go to satisfy his hunger?

    "Bianchon, if you have sometimes seen me hard and bitter, it was because I was adding my early sufferings on to the insensibility, the selfishness of which I have seen thousands of instances in the highest circles; or, perhaps, I was thinking of the obstacles which hatred, envy, jealousy, and calumny raised up between me and success. In Paris, when certain people see you ready to set your foot in the stirrup, some pull your coat-tails, others loosen the buckle of the strap that you may fall and crack your skull; one wrenches off your horse's shoes, another steals your whip, and the least treacherous of them all is the man whom you see coming to fire his pistol at you point blank.

    "You yourself, my dear boy, are clever enough to make acquaintance before long with the odious and incessant warfare waged by mediocrity against the superior man. If you should drop five-and-twenty louis one day, you will be accused of gambling on the next, and your best friends will report that you have lost twenty-five thousand. If you have a headache, you will be considered mad. If you are a little hasty, no one can live with you. If, to make a stand against this armament of pigmies, you collect your best powers, your best friends will cry out that you want to have everything, that you aim at domineering, at tyranny. In short, your good points will become your faults, your faults will be vices, and your virtues crime.

    "If you save a man, you will be said to have killed him; if he reappears on the scene, it will be positive that you have secured the present at the cost of the future. If he is not dead, he will die. Stumble, and you fall! Invent anything of any kind and claim your rights, you will be crotchety, cunning, ill-disposed to rising younger men.

    "So, you see, my dear fellow, if I do not believe in God, I believe still less in man. But do not you know in me another Desplein, altogether different from the Desplein whom every one abuses?—However, we will not stir that mud-heap.

    "Something inexpressively lovely and wonderful advances through the crystal, nearer, nearer. And, oh, inexpressively terrifying. For if it were to touch you, if it were to seize you and engulf you, you'd die; all the regular, habitual daily part of you would die … one would have to begin living arduously in the quiet, arduously in some strange, unheard of manner."


     






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    Glorious Member mu4's Avatar
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    “Hell is empty and all the devils are here.”
    William Shakespeare, The Tempest
    The mind a killing weapon
    The heart an open wound

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    The concept of identity stakes gives us another way to think about how side bets keep us caught in a rigged game. By identity stakes I mean all the side bets that ride on being able to convince others that we are who and what we claim to be. These identity claims matter because most of what comes to us in life depends on our relationships with others, and those relationships depend in turn on who and what others take us to be.
    salmon

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    Seriously Judicious Emotivist Eliza Thomason's Avatar
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    "I loved reading Jane Austen when I was a little girl. Her heroines and young gentlemen (even the cads) conversed in wonderfully articulate sentences that unfolded, phrase after phrase, like rose blossoms. I suspected that their ability to do this was somehow related to the elegant rooms in which the conversations took place: drawing rooms, sitting rooms, parlors, and halls in English manors and cottages. My friends and I didn't speak that way, but then we were usually hanging out in a family room that had once been a garage..."
    "A man with a definite belief always appears bizarre, because he does not change with the world; he has climbed into a fixed star, and the earth whizzes below him like a zoetrope."
    ........ G. ........... K. ............... C ........ H ........ E ...... S ........ T ...... E ........ R ........ T ........ O ........ N ........


    "Having a clear faith, based on the creed of the Church, is often labeled today as fundamentalism... Whereas relativism, which is letting oneself be tossed and swept along
    by every wind of teaching, looks like the only
    attitude acceptable to today's standards."
    - Pope Benedict the XVI, "The Dictatorship of Relativism"

    .
    .
    .


  28. #28
    Nasty Woman Kim's Avatar
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    “Rita Vargas caught her breath—the dark was spilling out of the mountains as the sun vanished in the west. The deep purple/blue shadows spread out on the water of the Caribe. The ocean was shadowy, yet at the same time, glowing. The massif green on one side, and velvety black on the other. And below, the lights of the cities scattered and burned, white, yellow, white, looking like gems. Stars.
    She still recalls it as one of the most beautiful sights she'd ever witnessed, as if the coast of Veracruz were somehow welcoming its sons home. It would have astounded the dead if they could have looked out the windows. Why would they ever have left such a beautiful home for the dry bones and spikes of the desert? If they could have seen what she saw, they might have stayed home.”
    ― Luis Alberto Urrea, The Devil's Highway: A True Story

    Love, love, love Luis Urrea <3
    “Have enough courage to trust love one more time and always one more time.”
    ― Maya Angelou

    “You cannot protect yourself from sadness without protecting yourself from happiness.”
    ― Jonathan Safran Foer

    “The secret of happiness is freedom, the secret of freedom is courage.”
    ― Carrie Jones, Need

  29. #29
    Seriously Judicious Emotivist Eliza Thomason's Avatar
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    Default From a Vision of the Final Resurrection

    Prologue:
    "A vast expanse of soil, so boundless as to be like a sea. I say "soil" because there is soil as on the fields and on the streets. But there are no trees, not a stalk, not a blade of grass. Dust, just dust. ...
    I see this in a light that is not light. A barely sketched, wan glimmer, of a greenish violet as can be seen at times of very strong storms or total eclipses. A frightening light of burnt-out stars. That's it: the sky is starless, there is no moon, no sun. The sky is empty, as the earth is empty. The one has been stripped of its flowers of light, the other of its plant and animal life. Both are huge sloughs of what used to be...."


    "...Then from the earth-gullies and from the sea-furrows, the white things, which I saw scattered and unbound, come up and reassemble. Millions upon millions upon millions of skeletons emerge from the oceans and stand up from the ground. Skeletons of all sizes: from tiny infant-skeletons with tiny hands like little dusty spiders, to adult skeletons, even gigantic ones whose bulk evokes some antediluvian beings. And they are amazed, somewhat shaking, like people waking up with a start from a deep sleep, who cannot make out where they are.

    The sight of all these skeletal bodies, shining white in this Apocalyptic "non-light", is frightful.

    Then a cloudiness not unlike fog rises from the open ground and open seas, and slowly condenses around these skeletons. Taking shape and becoming opaque, it turns to flesh, bodies like ours who now live. Eye sockets are filled with eyes and irises, cheek bones are covered with cheeks, over bare jaws gums now stretch and lips are remade and hair grows again on skulls and arms are fleshed out and fingers turn nimble and the whole bodies become alive again, just like ours.

    Though like ours, the new bodies look different. Some are wonderfully beautiful, with a perfection in shape and colors which make them like art masterpieces. Others are hideous, not on account of lameness or real deformities, but on account of their overall appearance more beastly than human: sidelong eyes, twisted faces, looks of a wild beast and, what strikes me the most, a darkness given off by those bodies which increases the leaden color of the air around them. Whereas the wonderfully beautiful ones have smiling eyes, peaceful faces, pleasant looks, and shed a brightness that makes a halo around their whole being from head to toe and spreads to the inside.

    If all were like the murky ones, darkness would be so complete as to hide everything. But because of the other ones, brightness not only lasts, it increases, so much that I can see everything as one should.

    The ugly ones' cursed destiny is not in doubt, because this curse is marked on their foreheads. They say nothing, casting around them frightened, sidelong glances with their faces lowered, and they gather to one side, upon an inmost command which I cannot hear but must have been given by someone and heard by the risen. The wonderfully beautiful ones also gather, smiling at one another and looking at the ugly ones with pity mixed with horror. And these exceedingly beautiful ones sing, singing to God a slow, tender hymn of blessing.

    I can see nothing else. I understand I just saw the final resurrection...."






    http://www.valtorta.org/final_resurr...efaultpage.asp
    "A man with a definite belief always appears bizarre, because he does not change with the world; he has climbed into a fixed star, and the earth whizzes below him like a zoetrope."
    ........ G. ........... K. ............... C ........ H ........ E ...... S ........ T ...... E ........ R ........ T ........ O ........ N ........


    "Having a clear faith, based on the creed of the Church, is often labeled today as fundamentalism... Whereas relativism, which is letting oneself be tossed and swept along
    by every wind of teaching, looks like the only
    attitude acceptable to today's standards."
    - Pope Benedict the XVI, "The Dictatorship of Relativism"

    .
    .
    .


  30. #30
    Landlord of the Dog and Duck Subteigh's Avatar
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    ‘Bang! They have thrown a chair now against the wall. We are damned then. My case is dubious too. Am I not indulging in unwarranted emotions? Yes, as I lean out of the window and drop my cigarette so that it twirls lightly to the ground, I feel Louis watching even my cigarette. And Louis says, “That means something. But what?”’

    ‘People go on passing,’ said Louis. They pass the window of this eating-shop incessantly. Motor-cars, vans, motor-omnibuses; and again motor-omnibuses, vans, motor-cars — they pass the window. In the background I perceive shops and houses; also the grey spires of a city church. In the foreground are glass shelves set with plates of buns and ham sandwiches. All is somewhat obscured by steam from a tea-urn. A meaty, vapourish smell of beef and mutton, sausages and mash, hangs down like a damp net in the middle of the eating- house. I prop my book against a bottle of Worcester sauce and try to look like the rest.

    ‘Yet I cannot. (They go on passing, they go on passing in disorderly procession.) I cannot read my book, or order my beef, with conviction. I repeat, “I am an average Englishman; I am an average clerk”, yet I look at the little men at the next table to be sure that I do what they do. Supple-faced, with rippling skins, that are always twitching with the multiplicity of their sensations, prehensile like monkeys, greased to this particular moment, they are discussing with all the right gestures the sale of a piano. It blocks up the hall; so he would take a Tenner. People go on passing; they go on passing against the spires of the church and the plates of ham sandwiches. The streamers of my consciousness waver out and are perpetually torn and distressed by their disorder. I cannot therefore concentrate on my dinner. “I would take a tenner. The case is handsome; but it blocks up the hall.” They dive and plunge like guillemots whose feathers are slippery with oil. All excesses beyond that norm are vanity. That is the mean; that is the average. Meanwhile the hats bob up and down; the door perpetually shuts and opens. I am conscious of flux, of disorder; of annihilation and despair. If this is all, this is worthless. Yet I feel, too, the rhythm of the eating- house. It is like a waltz tune, eddying in and out, round and round. The waitresses, balancing trays, swing in and out, round and round, dealing plates of greens, of apricot and custard, dealing them at the right time, to the right customers. The average men, including her rhythm in their rhythm (“I would take a tenner; for it blocks up the hall”) take their greens, take their apricots and custard. Where then is the break in this continuity? What the fissure through which one sees disaster? The circle is unbroken; the harmony complete. Here is the central rhythm; here the common mainspring. I watch it expand, contract; and then expand again. Yet I am not included. If I speak, imitating their accent, they prick their ears, waiting for me to speak again, in order that they may place me — if I come from Canada or Australia, I, who desire above all things to be taken to the arms with love, am alien, external. I, who would wish to feel close over me the protective waves of the ordinary, catch with the tail of my eye some far horizon; am aware of hats bobbing up and down in perpetual disorder. To me is addressed the plaint of the wandering and distracted spirit (a woman with bad teeth falters at the counter), “Bring us back to the fold, we who pass so disjectedly, bobbing up and down, past windows with plates of ham sandwiches in the foreground.” Yes; I will reduce you to order.

    ‘I will read in the book that is propped against the bottle of Worcester sauce. It contains some forged rings, some perfect statements, a few words, but poetry. You, all of you, ignore it. What the dead poet said, you have forgotten. And I cannot translate it to you so that its binding power ropes you in, and makes it clear to you that you are aimless; and the rhythm is cheap and worthless; and so remove that degradation which, if you are unaware of your aimlessness, pervades you, making you senile, even while you are young. To translate that poem so that it is easily read is to be my endeavour. I, the companion of Plato, of Virgil, will knock at the grained oak door. I oppose to what is passing this ramrod of beaten steel. I will not submit to this aimless passing of billycock hats and Homburg hats and all the plumed and variegated head-dresses of women. (Susan, whom I respect, would wear a plain straw hat on a summer’s day.) And the grinding and the steam that runs in unequal drops down the window pane; and the stopping and the starting with a jerk of motor-omnibuses; and the hesitations at counters; and the words that trail drearily without human meaning; I will reduce you to order.

    ‘My roots go down through veins of lead and silver, through damp, marshy places that exhale odours, to a knot made of oak roots bound together in the centre. Sealed and blind, with earth stopping my ears, I have yet heard rumours of wars; and the nightingale; have felt the hurrying of many troops of men flocking hither and thither in quest of civilization like flocks of birds migrating seeking the summer; I have seen women carrying red pitchers to the banks of the Nile. I woke in a garden, with a blow on the nape of my neck, a hot kiss, Jinny’s; remembering all this as one remembers confused cries and toppling pillars and shafts of red and black in some nocturnal conflagration. I am for ever sleeping and waking. Now I sleep; now I wake. I see the gleaming tea-urn; the glass cases full of pale-yellow sandwiches; the men in round coats perched on stools at the counter; and also behind them, eternity. It is a stigma burnt on my quivering flesh by a cowled man with a red-hot iron. I see this eating-shop against the packed and fluttering birds’ wings, many feathered, folded, of the past. Hence my pursed lips, my sickly pallor; my distasteful and uninviting aspect as I turn my face with hatred and bitterness upon Bernard and Neville, who saunter under yew trees; who inherit armchairs; and draw their curtains close, so that lamplight falls on their books.

    ‘Susan, I respect; because she sits stitching. She sews under a quiet lamp in a house where the corn sighs close to the window and gives me safety. For I am the weakest, the youngest of them all. I am a child looking at his feet and the little runnels that the stream has made in the gravel. That is a snail, I say; that is a leaf. I delight in the snails; I delight in the leaf, I am always the youngest, the most innocent, the most trustful. You are all protected. I am naked. When the waitress with the plaited wreaths of hair swings past, she deals you your apricots and custard unhesitatingly, like a sister. You are her brothers. But when I get up, brushing the crumbs from my waistcoat, I slip too large a tip, a shilling, under the edge of my plate, so that she may not find it till I am gone, and her scorn, as she picks it up with laughter, may not strike on me till I am past the swing-doors.’

  31. #31
    Queen of the Damned Aylen's Avatar
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    This is so good.

    These cases were stored in tiers of rectangular vaults — like closed, locked shelves — wrought of the same rustless metal and fastened by knobs with intricate turnings. My own history was assigned a specific place in the vaults of the lowest or vertebrate level — the section devoted to the culture of mankind and of the furry and reptilian races immediately preceding it in terrestrial dominance.

    But none of the dreams ever gave me a full picture of daily life. All were the merest misty, disconnected fragments, and it is certain that these fragments were not unfolded in their rightful sequence. I have, for example, a very imperfect idea of my own living arrangements in the dream-world; though I seem to have possessed a great stone room of my own. My restrictions as a prisoner gradually disappeared, so that some of the visions included vivid travels over the mighty jungle roads, sojourns in strange cities, and explorations of some of the vast, dark, windowless ruins from which the Great Race shrank in curious fear. There were also long sea voyages in enormous, many-decked boats of incredible swiftness, and trips over wild regions in closed projectile-like airships lifted and moved by electrical repulsion.

    Beyond the wide, warm ocean were other cities of the Great Race, and on one far continent I saw the crude villages of the black-snouted, winged creatures who would evolve as a dominant stock after the Great Race had sent its foremost minds into the future to escape the creeping horror. Flatness and exuberant green life were always the keynote of the scene. Hills were low and sparse, and usually displayed signs of volcanic forces.

    Of the animals I saw, I could write volumes. All were wild; for the Great Race’s mechanised culture had long since done away with domestic beasts, while food was wholly vegetable or synthetic. Clumsy reptiles of great bulk floundered in steaming morasses, fluttered in the heavy air, or spouted in the seas and lakes; and among these I fancied I could vaguely recognise lesser, archaic prototypes of many forms — dinosaurs, pterodactyls, ichthyosaurs, labyrinthodonts, plesiosaurs, and the like-made familiar through palaeontology. Of birds or mammals there were none that I could discover.

    "Something inexpressively lovely and wonderful advances through the crystal, nearer, nearer. And, oh, inexpressively terrifying. For if it were to touch you, if it were to seize you and engulf you, you'd die; all the regular, habitual daily part of you would die … one would have to begin living arduously in the quiet, arduously in some strange, unheard of manner."


     






  32. #32
    Landlord of the Dog and Duck Subteigh's Avatar
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    ‘Heaven help us,’ said Orlando, standing at the window and watching the pigeons at their pranks, ‘what a world we live in! What a world to be sure!’ Its complexities amazed her. It now seemed to her that the whole world was ringed with gold. She went in to dinner. Wedding rings abounded. She went to church. Wedding rings were everywhere. She drove out. Gold, or pinchbeck, thin, thick, plain, smooth, they glowed dully on every hand. Rings filled the jewellers’ shops, not the flashing pastes and diamonds of Orlando’s recollection, but simple bands without a stone in them. At the same time, she began to notice a new habit among the town people. In the old days, one would meet a boy trifling with a girl under a hawthorn hedge frequently enough. Orlando had flicked many a couple with the tip of her whip and laughed and passed on. Now, all that was changed. Couples trudged and plodded in the middle of the road indissolubly linked together. The woman’s right hand was invariably passed through the man’s left and her fingers were firmly gripped by his. Often it was not till the horses’ noses were on them that they budged, and then, though they moved it was all in one piece, heavily, to the side of the road. Orlando could only suppose that some new discovery had been made about the race; that they were somehow stuck together, couple after couple, but who had made it and when, she could not guess. It did not seem to be Nature. She looked at the doves and the rabbits and the elk-hounds and she could not see that Nature had changed her ways or mended them, since the time of Elizabeth at least. There was no indissoluble alliance among the brutes that she could see. Could it be Queen Victoria then, or Lord Melbourne? Was it from them that the great discovery of marriage proceeded? Yet the Queen, she pondered, was said to be fond of dogs, and Lord Melbourne, she had heard, was said to be fond of women. It was strange — it was distasteful; indeed, there was something in this indissolubility of bodies which was repugnant to her sense of decency and sanitation. Her ruminations, however, were accompanied by such a tingling and twanging of the afflicted finger that she could scarcely keep her ideas in order. They were languishing and ogling like a housemaid’s fancies. They made her blush. There was nothing for it but to buy one of those ugly bands and wear it like the rest. This she did, slipping it, overcome with shame, upon her finger in the shadow of a curtain; but without avail. The tingling persisted more violently, more indignantly than ever. She did not sleep a wink that night. Next morning when she took up the pen to write, either she could think of nothing, and the pen made one large lachrymose blot after another, or it ambled off, more alarmingly still, into mellifluous fluencies about early death and corruption, which were worse than no thinking at all. For it would seem — her case proved it — that we write, not with the fingers, but with the whole person. The nerve which controls the pen winds itself about every fibre of our being, threads the heart, pierces the liver. Though the seat of her trouble seemed to be the left hand, she could feel herself poisoned through and through, and was forced at length to consider the most desperate of remedies, which was to yield completely and submissively to the spirit of the age, and take a husband.

    That this was much against her natural temperament has been sufficiently made plain. When the sound of the Archduke’s chariot wheels died away, the cry that rose to her lips was ‘Life! A Lover!’ not ‘Life! A Husband!’ and it was in pursuit of this aim that she had gone to town and run about the world as has been shown in the previous chapter. Such is the indomitable nature of the spirit of the age, however, that it batters down anyone who tries to make stand against it far more effectually than those who bend its own way. Orlando had inclined herself naturally to the Elizabethan spirit, to the Restoration spirit, to the spirit of the eighteenth century, and had in consequence scarcely been aware of the change from one age to the other. But the spirit of the nineteenth century was antipathetic to her in the extreme, and thus it took her and broke her, and she was aware of her defeat at its hands as she had never been before. For it is probable that the human spirit has its place in time assigned to it; some are born of this age, some of that; and now that Orlando was grown a woman, a year or two past thirty indeed, the lines of her character were fixed, and to bend them the wrong way was intolerable.

    So she stood mournfully at the drawing-room window (Bartholomew had so christened the library) dragged down by the weight of the crinoline which she had submissively adopted. It was heavier and more drab than any dress she had yet worn. None had ever so impeded her movements. No longer could she stride through the garden with her dogs, or run lightly to the high mound and fling herself beneath the oak tree. Her skirts collected damp leaves and straw. The plumed hat tossed on the breeze. The thin shoes were quickly soaked and mud-caked. Her muscles had lost their pliancy. She became nervous lest there should be robbers behind the wainscot and afraid, for the first time in her life, of ghosts in the corridors. All these things inclined her, step by step, to submit to the new discovery, whether Queen Victoria’s or another’s, that each man and each woman has another allotted to it for life, whom it supports, by whom it is supported, till death them do part. It would be a comfort, she felt, to lean; to sit down; yes, to lie down; never, never, never to get up again. Thus did the spirit work upon her, for all her past pride, and as she came sloping down the scale of emotion to this lowly and unaccustomed lodging-place, those twangings and tinglings which had been so captious and so interrogative modulated into the sweetest melodies, till it seemed as if angels were plucking harp-strings with white fingers and her whole being was pervaded by a seraphic harmony.

    But whom could she lean upon? She asked that question of the wild autumn winds. For it was now October, and wet as usual. Not the Archduke; he had married a very great lady and had hunted hares in Roumania these many years now; nor Mr M.; he was become a Catholic; nor the Marquis of C.; he made sacks in Botany Bay; nor the Lord O.; he had long been food for fishes. One way or another, all her old cronies were gone now, and the Nells and the Kits of Drury Lane, much though she favoured them, scarcely did to lean upon.

    ‘Whom’, she asked, casting her eyes upon the revolving clouds, clasping her hands as she knelt on the window-sill, and looking the very image of appealing womanhood as she did so, ‘can I lean upon?’ Her words formed themselves, her hands clasped themselves, involuntarily, just as her pen had written of its own accord. It was not Orlando who spoke, but the spirit of the age. But whichever it was, nobody answered it. The rooks were tumbling pell-mell among the violet clouds of autumn. The rain had stopped at last and there was an iridescence in the sky which tempted her to put on her plumed hat and her little stringed shoes and stroll out before dinner

    ‘Everyone is mated except myself,’ she mused, as she trailed disconsolately across the courtyard. There were the rooks; Canute and Pippin even — transitory as their alliances were, still each this evening seemed to have a partner. ‘Whereas, I, who am mistress of it all,’ Orlando thought, glancing as she passed at the innumerable emblazoned windows of the hall, ‘am single, am mateless, am alone.’

    Such thoughts had never entered her head before. Now they bore her down unescapably. Instead of thrusting the gate open, she tapped with a gloved hand for the porter to unfasten it for her. One must lean on someone, she thought, if it is only on a porter; and half wished to stay behind and help him to grill his chop on a bucket of fiery coals, but was too timid to ask it. So she strayed out into the park alone, faltering at first and apprehensive lest there might be poachers or gamekeepers or even errand-boys to marvel that a great lady should walk alone.

    At every step she glanced nervously lest some male form should be hiding behind a furze bush or some savage cow be lowering its horns to toss her. But there were only the rooks flaunting in the sky. A steel-blue plume from one of them fell among the heather. She loved wild birds’ feathers. She had used to collect them as a boy. She picked it up and stuck it in her hat. The air blew upon her spirit somewhat and revived it. As the rooks went whirling and wheeling above her head and feather after feather fell gleaming through the purplish air, she followed them, her long cloak floating behind her, over the moor, up the hill. She had not walked so far for years. Six feathers had she picked from the grass and drawn between her fingers and pressed to her lips to feel their smooth, glinting plumage, when she saw, gleaming on the hill-side, a silver pool, mysterious as the lake into which Sir Bedivere flung the sword of Arthur. A single feather quivered in the air and fell into the middle of it. Then, some strange ecstasy came over her. Some wild notion she had of following the birds to the rim of the world and flinging herself on the spongy turf and there drinking forgetfulness, while the rooks’ hoarse laughter sounded over her. She quickened her pace; she ran; she tripped; the tough heather roots flung her to the ground. Her ankle was broken. She could not rise. But there she lay content. The scent of the bog myrtle and the meadow-sweet was in her nostrils. The rooks’ hoarse laughter was in her ears. ‘I have found my mate,’ she murmured. ‘It is the moor. I am nature’s bride,’ she whispered, giving herself in rapture to the cold embraces of the grass as she lay folded in her cloak in the hollow by the pool. ‘Here will I lie. (A feather fell upon her brow.) I have found a greener laurel than the bay. My forehead will be cool always. These are wild birds’ feathers — the owl’s, the nightjar’s. I shall dream wild dreams. My hands shall wear no wedding ring,’ she continued, slipping it from her finger. ‘The roots shall twine about them. Ah!’ she sighed, pressing her head luxuriously on its spongy pillow, ‘I have sought happiness through many ages and not found it; fame and missed it; love and not known it; life — and behold, death is better. I have known many men and many women,’ she continued; ‘none have I understood. It is better that I should lie at peace here with only the sky above me — as the gipsy told me years ago. That was in Turkey.’ And she looked straight up into the marvellous golden foam into which the clouds had churned themselves, and saw next moment a track in it, and camels passing in single file through the rocky desert among clouds of red dust; and then, when the camels had passed, there were only mountains, very high and full of clefts and with pinnacles of rock, and she fancied she heard goat bells ringing in their passes, and in their folds were fields of irises and gentian. So the sky changed and her eyes slowly lowered themselves down and down till they came to the rain-darkened earth and saw the great hump of the South Downs, flowing in one wave along the coast; and where the land parted, there was the sea, the sea with ships passing; and she fancied she heard a gun far out at sea, and thought at first, ‘That’s the Armada,’ and then thought ‘No, it’s Nelson’, and then remembered how those wars were over and the ships were busy merchant ships; and the sails on the winding river were those of pleasure boats. She saw, too, cattle sprinkled on the dark fields, sheep and cows, and she saw the lights coming here and there in farm-house windows, and lanterns moving among the cattle as the shepherd went his rounds and the cowman; and then the lights went out and the stars rose and tangled themselves about the sky. Indeed, she was falling asleep with the wet feathers on her face and her ear pressed to the ground when she heard, deep within, some hammer on an anvil, or was it a heart beating? Tick-tock, tick-tock, so it hammered, so it beat, the anvil, or the heart in the middle of the earth; until, as she listened, she thought it changed to the trot of a horse’s hoofs; one, two, three, four, she counted; then she heard a stumble; then, as it came nearer and nearer, she could hear the crack of a twig and the suck of the wet bog in its hoofs. The horse was almost on her. She sat upright. Towering dark against the yellow-slashed sky of dawn, with the plovers rising and falling about him, she saw a man on horseback. He started. The horse stopped.

    ‘Madam,’ the man cried, leaping to the ground, ‘you’re hurt!’

    ‘I’m dead, sir!’ she replied.

    A few minutes later, they became engaged.

    The morning after, as they sat at breakfast, he told her his name. It was Marmaduke Bonthrop Shelmerdine, Esquire.

    ‘I knew it!’ she said, for there was something romantic and chivalrous, passionate, melancholy, yet determined about him which went with the wild, dark-plumed name — a name which had, in her mind, the steel-blue gleam of rooks’ wings, the hoarse laughter of their caws, the snake-like twisting descent of their feathers in a silver pool, and a thousand other things which will be described presently.

    ‘Mine is Orlando,’ she said. He had guessed it. For if you see a ship in full sail coming with the sun on it proudly sweeping across the Mediterranean from the South Seas, one says at once, ‘Orlando’, he explained.

    In fact, though their acquaintance had been so short, they had guessed, as always happens between lovers, everything of any importance about each other in two seconds at the utmost, and it now remained only to fill in such unimportant details as what they were called; where they lived; and whether they were beggars or people of substance. He had a castle in the Hebrides, but it was ruined, he told her. Gannets feasted in the banqueting hall. He had been a soldier and a sailor, and had explored the East. He was on his way now to join his brig at Falmouth, but the wind had fallen and it was only when the gale blew from the South-west that he could put out to sea. Orlando looked hastily from the breakfast-room window at the gilt leopard on the weather vane. Mercifully its tail pointed due east and was steady as a rock. ‘Oh! Shel, don’t leave me!’ she cried. ‘I’m passionately in love with you,’ she said. No sooner had the words left her mouth than an awful suspicion rushed into both their minds simultaneously.

    ‘You’re a woman, Shel!’ she cried.

    ‘You’re a man, Orlando!’ he cried.

    Never was there such a scene of protestation and demonstration as then took place since the world began. When it was over and they were seated again she asked him, what was this talk of a South-west gale? Where was he bound for?

    ‘For the Horn,’ he said briefly, and blushed. (For a man had to blush as a woman had, only at rather different things.) It was only by dint of great pressure on her side and the use of much intuition that she gathered that his life was spent in the most desperate and splendid of adventures — which is to voyage round Cape Horn in the teeth of a gale. Masts had been snapped off; sails torn to ribbons (she had to drag the admission from him). Sometimes the ship had sunk, and he had been left the only survivor on a raft with a biscuit.

    ‘It’s about all a fellow can do nowadays,’ he said sheepishly, and helped himself to great spoonfuls of strawberry jam. The vision which she had thereupon of this boy (for he was little more) sucking peppermints, for which he had a passion, while the masts snapped and the stars reeled and he roared brief orders to cut this adrift, to heave that overboard, brought the tears to her eyes, tears, she noted, of a finer flavour than any she had cried before: ‘I am a woman,’ she thought, ‘a real woman, at last.’ She thanked Bonthrop from the bottom of her heart for having given her this rare and unexpected delight. Had she not been lame in the left foot, she would have sat upon his knee.

    ‘Shel, my darling,’ she began again, ‘tell me . . . ’ and so they talked two hours or more, perhaps about Cape Horn, perhaps not, and really it would profit little to write down what they said, for they knew each other so well that they could say anything, which is tantamount to saying nothing, or saying such stupid, prosy things as how to cook an omelette, or where to buy the best boots in London, things which have no lustre taken from their setting, yet are positively of amazing beauty within it. For it has come about, by the wise economy of nature, that our modern spirit can almost dispense with language; the commonest expressions do, since no expressions do; hence the most ordinary conversation is often the most poetic, and the most poetic is precisely that which cannot be written down. For which reasons we leave a great blank here, which must be taken to indicate that the space is filled to repletion.
    EII-Ne
    9w1 or 5w4 Sp/So

  33. #33
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    "Never again will you be capable of love, or friendship, or joy of living, or laughter, or curiosity, or courage, or integrity. You will be hollow. We shall squeeze you empty, and then we shall fill you with ourselves.'

    He paused and signed to the man in the white coat. Winston was aware of some heavy piece of apparatus being pushed into place behind his head. O'Brien had sat down beside the bed, so that his face was almost on a level with Winston's.

    'Three thousand,' he said, speaking over Winston's head to the man in the white coat.

    Two soft pads, which felt slightly moist, clamped themselves against Winston's temples. He quailed. There was pain coming, a new kind of pain."

    "Something inexpressively lovely and wonderful advances through the crystal, nearer, nearer. And, oh, inexpressively terrifying. For if it were to touch you, if it were to seize you and engulf you, you'd die; all the regular, habitual daily part of you would die … one would have to begin living arduously in the quiet, arduously in some strange, unheard of manner."


     






  34. #34
    Landlord of the Dog and Duck Subteigh's Avatar
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    I don't like repetition.

    For example, there have been nine songs in the Top Ten, I think, called "Hold On" (Including, I think, once there were two called "Hold On" simultaneously in the Top Ten). OK, if you're really cynical, and you've written a new song, you'll probably want to call it "Hold On" because it gives you an extra edge. But at the same time it shows so little interest in originality that I can't actually listen to anything called "Hold On" at this point in my life. I mean, it just seems crazy.

    So, if I have two little rules and guiding principles, they would be:

    (a) Don’t use words that other people use. Very few people would put the word, oh, I don’t know, “pterodactyl” into a song. So that’s fine. No “Oh”’s. No “Baby”’s. No “I miss you so”’s. And no “you done me wrong”. No “bad”’s or “sad”’s.

    [(b)] And the other thing is, write about subjects that no one else writes about. Basically 90% of all songs seem to be either "Baby, I love you so", or "Baby, you've done me wrong". Now, when people look at songs, when I play anybody on the planet this song, and I say "What is this?", they will say, "Oh, that's Reggae", or "Oh, that's Heavy Metal", or "That's Country & Western", or "Oh, that's Opera", you know what I mean? But that's not what I asked. They're answering a question I didn't ask. What they're saying is "That's the music". What I'm saying is "What is the song?" And the song is either "I've done you wrong", or, "Baby, I love you so", no matter what style it's played in. In other words, there's a huge difference between content and style, and, if you work more towards content, why not make it content that is original.
    ….

    If it's already been written, why write it again? If it's already been said, why say it again? I mean there are some remarkable quotes that I love. But I didn't say them. And you don't want to pass them off as your own work.

    Napoleon said that "Time spent in reconnaissance is never wasted". And that, actually, has governed my life. You know what I mean? That's a quote you can live by. But it's not my quote. So if I say it I always credit it to Napoleon.

    There is another way of saying any of the things you want to say, rather than rehashing someone else's words.
    ….

    I think of songs as cinema, really. It's aural cinema. I want to show you a movie when I'm playing a song. That's essentially what I'm doing.

    And, of course, the songs are geographical too. One of the ways I get inspired to write a song – and this will always produce a song that sounds like nothing else (I can't, I can't recommend this highly enough) – I just open a world atlas, just at random, and whatever page I'm looking at, at least six songs immediately occur to me.
    ….

    So, if you look at pretty much any of the songs, a lot of them are geographical, historical, and from a movie.
    ~ Al Stewart

  35. #35
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    The more I love humanity in general the less I love man in particular. In my dreams, I often make plans for the service of humanity, and perhaps I might actually face crucifixion if it were suddenly necessary. Yet I am incapable of living in the same room with anyone for two days together. I know from experience. As soon as anyone is near me, his personality disturbs me and restricts my freedom. In twenty-four hours I begin to hate the best of men: one because he’s too long over his dinner, another because he has a cold and keeps on blowing his nose. I become hostile to people the moment they come close to me. But it has always happened that the more I hate men individually the more I love humanity.
    Fyodor Dostoevsky “The Brothers Karamazov”
    -
    Dual type (as per tcaudilllg)
    Enneagram 2w1sw(1w9) helps others to live up to their own standards of what a good person is and is very behind the scenes in the process.
    Tritype 1-2-6 stacking sp/sx


    I'm constantly looking to align the real with the ideal.I've been more oriented toward being overly idealistic by expecting the real to match the ideal. My thinking side is dominent. The result is that sometimes I can be overly impersonal or self-centered in my approach, not being understanding of others in the process and simply thinking "you should do this" or "everyone should follor this rule"..."regardless of how they feel or where they're coming from"which just isn't a good attitude to have. It is a way, though, to give oneself an artificial sense of self-justification. LSE

    Best description of functions:
    http://socionicsstudy.blogspot.com/2...functions.html

  36. #36
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    "It has been my experience that there is a definite feeling which goes along with this, that someone is "out to get you" or "watching with maliciousness". Perhaps someone has actually threatened you, or your family, and you want to protect yourself from whatever energy they are directing at you. As well as doing all you can on the physical plane, there are some things you can do magickally as well.

    If you only have ONE or TWO of these signs, then chances are very good that you are NOT under psychic attack. Look instead for a reasonable explanation and work to change the symptom on the physical level. However, if you have many of these occurrences, and have this feeling that I described, and know that you have made someone angry at you or have been threatened by them - then you should assume that they could be attacking you on an astral level. Note also, that people who send you negative energy, don't have to know anything about magick or actually be doing a "spell" to have their negative or hurtful energy affect you.

    A spell you can do is called a "reversal spell". One way to do a reversal spell would be to utilize a red/black candle and a mirror, to send back out whatever is being sent to you. These candles are red at one end and black at the other, and can be obtained from an occult shop, but many New Age type shops do not carry them.

    Place the candle in front of the mirror and state that any negative energy that comes to you is bounced back to the sender without harming you.

    Don't put a name to the reversal spell no matter how sure you think you are of the source. You may be sending it to an innocent person or a pawn of someone else, and thereby miss the real culprit entirely. Putting a "name" on the spell or focusing this energy and anger on a person is unethical, and makes you just as bad if not worse than the person you believe is doing something to you! Believe it or not, you COULD be WRONG! So, simply send it back "whence it came" and you will be sure that it is going to the right place. You may not know where the energy came from, but the Universe certainly does! This is ethical because you are not putting a name to it - just returning it. Besides, it is their energy to start with. This is self-defense.

    There are people you will have to deal with, on a daily basis perhaps, that just attract negativity to them like a magnet. They are constantly complaining, finding fault, or just always having a bad day. One way to deal with this is again by using mirrors. Place a few tiny mirrors around your desk, in the four directions if possible, but no less than three, and aim them away from your area. This will also help deflect other's negative energy. However, if YOU are the source of the negativity, you will soon know it, because all your own negativity will be reflected back to you as well! So be very careful to stay calm, and focused, and not let little things bother you."




    "Something inexpressively lovely and wonderful advances through the crystal, nearer, nearer. And, oh, inexpressively terrifying. For if it were to touch you, if it were to seize you and engulf you, you'd die; all the regular, habitual daily part of you would die … one would have to begin living arduously in the quiet, arduously in some strange, unheard of manner."


     






  37. #37
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    "The snake began to itch beneath her skin. The venom she had taken from the silver vile was now acting on not only her physical body but also her soul. She gittered as the venom, the poison, moved into her blood stream. This golden liquid that if taken, whilst raising your vibration to a certain level, would allow you to commune with Kali. Be one with her. That is if it did not send you crazy before you got that far. The venom seldom killed but it had a very strong hallucinogenic property that made it one of the most powerful “trips” on the planet. A pain, a violent stabbing feeling pushed up against the back of her eyes as the poison entered her brain. She fell to her feet. She became aware how numb her body already was, as no pain was felt. She got to her feet and saw the blood gently flowing from her knee, she reached down and wiping it from herself, whispering “Kali-Ma,” as she licked her fingers clean.

    The streets were overcrowded with people all trying to get to one temple or another for Nagapangene, the fifth day of Sharhan, which was an important snake festival. The weather was sticky and hot. She pulled the cloth around her head. It was not wise to be seen as a serpent dancer with the crowds so excited. Usually her kind were respected, but with so much snake energy around, it was not a wise thing to do. Here in Vadhu the energy had gone bad. Whores and thieves congregated on every street corner. It was not safe to step out after dark, no matter who you were, but at the time of the Serpent festival it was even more dangerous as many were drinking too much and ingesting strong hallucinogenic herbs and potions.

    Men jeered at her as her cloaked body slipped silently through the streets. She would not give herself to a man; she would only give herself to Kali. She moved silently and undisturbed until she came to the secret entrance to the temple of Kali. As she entered the dark passageway she could hear screams, screams of the dying. Behind this eerie sound, chanting could be heard. “Kali Ma.” There was madness in the air; the energy within was chaotic and wild. She passed quickly along the passage; there was the most awful smell, like fresh blood. As she turned the corner she came into a small dimly lit room, many more women gathered there. Dressing they adorned their bodies with jewellery, perfumes and oils. The atmosphere was incredibly sensual and sexual. It was as if the very air contained the anticipation of what they were to do.

    She began to prepare herself oiling her smooth body. She was small and very thin, but her legs and back were powerful, years of riding the snake had made her strong even though she seldom felt nourished. Her hair was long and tied in one plait that was matted and heavy. A single red stone was placed upon her forehead and a silver chain around her waist. All over her body were welts and cuts, tattoos of snakes spiralled around her belly and thighs. There were patterns literally carved into her skin, patterns of beautiful snakes and serpents. She had her tongue pierced with a large gold ball. Strapped around her lower leg with a black braid of hair, was the dagger of “KaliStar.” Its handle was made from black “obsidian,” its blade sharp and clean. This was no ordinary blade; it was the blade of sacrifice, the giver of Blood. She did not use this weapon upon any other; its sweet kiss was saved only for herself, for she had made those scars on her body, each one done with the most utmost precision and intention.

    "Something inexpressively lovely and wonderful advances through the crystal, nearer, nearer. And, oh, inexpressively terrifying. For if it were to touch you, if it were to seize you and engulf you, you'd die; all the regular, habitual daily part of you would die … one would have to begin living arduously in the quiet, arduously in some strange, unheard of manner."


     






  38. #38
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    In 1804, Shelley entered Eton College, where he fared poorly, and was subjected to an almost daily mob torment at around noon by older boys, who aptly called these incidents "Shelley-baits". Surrounded, the young Shelley would have his books torn from his hands and his clothes pulled at and torn until he cried out madly in his high-pitched "cracked soprano" of a voice. This daily misery could be attributed to Shelley's refusal to take part in fagging and his indifference towards games and other youthful activities. Because of these peculiarities he acquired the nickname "Mad Shelley". Shelley possessed a keen interest in science at Eton, which he would often apply to cause a surprising amount of mischief for a boy considered to be so sensible. Shelley would often use a frictional electric machine to charge the door handle of his room, much to the amusement of his friends. His friends were particularly amused when his gentlemanly tutor, Mr Bethell, in attempting to enter his room, was alarmed at the noise of the electric shocks, despite Shelley's dutiful protestations. His mischievous side was again demonstrated by "his last bit of naughtiness at school", which was to blow up a tree on Eton's South Meadow with gunpowder. Despite these jocular incidents, a contemporary of Shelley, W.H. Merie, recalls that Shelley made no friends at Eton, although he did seek a kindred spirit without success.
    Sounds like a combination of me and my brother.
    EII-Ne
    9w1 or 5w4 Sp/So

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    Everyone loves stories about couples who are as much in love after 50 years as they were back when they had complete control of their bladders. The ultimate goal of marriage is to be snuggled up to the same person, decade after decade, until your genitals wither and your partner's once supple flesh is scrunched up raisin-like beneath your arthritic palms. Old-people couples are cute, is what we're saying.

    "In theory there is no difference between theory and practice. In practice there is." - Yogi Berra

  40. #40
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    ‘Should I seek out some tree? Should I desert these form rooms and libraries, and the broad yellow page in which I read Catullus, for woods and fields? Should I walk under beech trees, or saunter along the river bank, where the trees meet united like lovers in the water? But nature is too vegetable, too vapid. She has only sublimities and vastitudes and water and leaves. I begin to wish for firelight, privacy, and the limbs of one person.’
    ..
    EII-Ne
    9w1 or 5w4 Sp/So

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