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Thread: FEAR - PTSD: Dissociation and Projection

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    Default FEAR - PTSD: Dissociation and Projection

    It seems when it comes to human conditioning there are two kinds of fear - 'fear of losing security' and the 'fear of having lost that security'. They say humans are 'social animals'. I suppose given our fear of losing security that would be true; people want to trust others - it's in our most basic interest to do so and might possibly be more a result of higher evolutionary intelligence than anything else.

    Normally the 'fear of losing security' manifests itself in moral beliefs and codes about how to treat or behave around other people. This gives a person clear definitions or delineations of thought that allow them to make well-informed decisions that should aid them positively in the course of their life. But what happens when that security is threatened? Normally, one would expect to trust more in those things that are secure and reliable or perhaps if that isn't available even, then they will act out in various ways - as an attempt to haphazardly demand that security from others. If the latter isn't viewed legitimately, it will be deemed socially unacceptable and the person will have no choice but to deal with the 'fear of having lost that security'. In this stage, there is no healing or sanity, one must either perish or numb themselves to the paradoxical fear that binds them. The pariah must become an animal, become a beast. This is PTSD.

    An example of this is PTSD in soldiers. In war, they see and do things, while having things done to them that habitually engage their 'fear of losing security'. The atrocities of war leave its questioning mark on the certainty of human trust that they once had. They can either find solace in the securities they do have (such as family, friends, etc), which the military expects them to do; or they can act out in various ways to correct the situation, something the military doesn't encourage with its chains of command and orders (if you happen to go to a psychiatrist, you're booted from service). If the soldier feels hopeless, that neither option is good, they go to 'fear of having lost that security'. Now they can commit suicide or lose their humanity, but it's really that simple - one or the other. This is the nature of PTSD - to conquer fear and become a beast.

    And when there is no longer threat of fear, it's so easy to see it in other people. Other people's preoccupations with what they value become almost everything that they are. I suppose these are simply the essence of projections. Behind all subjective weakness, one finds types of fear.

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    escaping anndelise's Avatar
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    Uh no.

    PTSD refers to flashbacks that are triggered by something in the current environment, wherein the body/mind responds as it had learned to respond in the previous life/psyche threatening environment.
    It is a "disorder" because the responses aren't appropriate to the current environment, and it causes problems in the person's life, job, relationships.

    For example, a loud pop in war frontlines might mean enemy fire: duck, run, fire back.
    However, in a quiet suburban neighborhood, a loud pop might be a car backfiring. The noise though still triggers the duck, run, fire back instincts, and/or a flashback/reliving of a previous life/psyche threatening experience.
    IEE 649 sx/sp cp

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    Memory of Tomorrow Reuben's Avatar
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    The mind learns when our neurons are fired up by glutamate, and then stabilized by dopamine. Glutamates excite the neuron, while dopamine keeps it in a stable state of excitement so that the same knowledge passed on through it can be retained for up to a few years. Under traumatic stress, the amount of dopamine skyrockets. If you learned a behaviour instilled to you during a period of great fear and stress, you will tend to remember it for a very very long time, because it is literally 'burnt' into your brain by the dopamine. So yes, it works exactly like how delise described above.
    She is wise
    beyond words
    beautiful within
    her soul
    brighter than
    the sun
    lovelier than
    love
    dreams larger
    than life
    and does not
    understand the
    meaning of no.
    Because everything
    through her, and in her, is
    "Yes, it will be done."


    Why I love LSEs:
    Quote Originally Posted by Abbie
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