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Thread: Toshiro Mifune

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    eunice's Avatar
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    Default Toshiro Mifune

    Toshirō Mifune (三船 敏郎 Mifune Toshirō [miɸɯne toɕiɽoː]; April 1, 1920 – December 24, 1997) was a Japanese actor who appeared in almost 170 feature films. He is best known for his 16-film collaboration with filmmaker Akira Kurosawa, from 1948 to 1965, in works such as Rashomon, Seven Samurai, Throne of Blood, and Yojimbo. He is also popular for portraying Musashi Miyamoto in Hiroshi Inagaki's Samurai Trilogy.





    Trivia

    Ranked #90 in Empire (UK) magazine's "The Top 100 Movie Stars of All Time" list. [October 1997]

    Was considered early on by George Lucas for the role of Obi-Wan Kenobi in Star Wars: Episode IV - A New Hope (1977).

    Even though Mifune worked hard to learn his English-speaking roles phonetically, his voice was always dubbed in the American films in which he appeared. This was one of the things that disappointed him up until the day he died.

    Mexican director/producer Ismael Rodríguez cast him as the drunken Mexican-Indian title role of his film Ánimas Trujano (El hombre importante) (1962). Mifune studied a tape of a Mexican actor speaking his dialog to memorize his lines. Then, on the shooting he was able to speak his entire part in Spanish. Despite this fact, in the finished film, his voice is dubbed by Mexican actor Narciso Busquets.

    Reportedly watched films of lions in the wild for inspiration for his character in Seven Samurai (1954).

    Due to his intense, intimidating screen presence and real-life status as a physical powerful tough guy and war veteran, most people (whether having known him only from film or having personally meet him) got the impression that Mifune was a much larger man than he actually was, in reality he stood 5' 9". However, even at this size he was indeed 2 or 3 inches taller than most of his male co-stars.

    Close friend of Scott Glenn.

    Spoke fluent Mandarin.

    Personally trained the Asian extras who were hired to play the Japanese submarine crew in 1941 (1979). He was reportedly very annoyed that they were not real sailors and had no real training, so he used his own military background to teach them how to act like sailors in the film.

    His prolific career included repeat roles as three of the most noted figures in Japanese history. He portrayed Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto in three separate films, has played both the real life version of the indomitable warlord Tokugawa Ieyasu in Journey of Honor (1991) and his fictionalized counterpart Toranaga in "Shogun" (1980), and has performed the role of the legendary master swordsman Miyamoto Musashi four times.

    His performance as Sanjuro Kuwabatake in Yojimbo (1961) is ranked #78 on Premiere Magazine's 100 Greatest Performances of All Time (2006).

    He actually wanted to be a photographer, not an actor. He got his start in the movies when he blundered into an audition by mistake and flew into a rage.

    He was considered for the role of "Mr. Miyagi" in The Karate Kid (1984) but, after the reading, the producers felt that he acted the part too scary.

    Favorite actor of Akira Kurosawa.



    Personal Quotes

    Of Akira Kurosawa: "I am proud of nothing I have done other than with him."

    (about speaking English) I can't speak English, Instead memorize English lines by the sounds of the words.

    I'm not always great in pictures, but I'm always true to the Japanese spirit.

    There I was, a naive man of 20. The other bewildered young recruits were stirred up to a blood lust. What a nightmare! - on the xenophobia displayed by his fellow troops in World War II

    That the Japanese film is known at all in the West is due mainly to the pictures of Akira Kurosawa. That I am known both here and abroad is also mainly due to him. He taught me practically everything I know, and it was he who first introduced me to myself as an actor. Kurosawa has this quality, this ability to bring things out of you that you never knew were there. It is enormously difficult work, but each picture with him is a revelation. When you see his films, you find them full realizations of ideas, of emotions, of a philosophy which surprises with its strength, even shocks with its power. You had not expected to be so moved, to find within your own self this depth of understanding.

    Snippets of him in a movie:


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    Snomunegot munenori2's Avatar
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    I'll have to mull it over, but I think that's a pretty good guess.

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    eunice's Avatar
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    I accidentally deleted my second post in this thread earlier on. My guess, which munenori2 was referring to, is Te-ISTp, btw.
    Last edited by eunice; 06-09-2011 at 03:43 PM.

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    when you see the booty Galen's Avatar
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    I have no idea about his type, but from what little I've read he seems like an interesting figure. Something Te maybe.
    "And above all, watch with glittering eyes the whole world around you because the greatest secrets are always hidden in the most unlikely places. Those who don't believe in magic will never find it." -Roald Dahl

    http://forum.socionix.com/
    It's pretty cool

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    when you see the booty Galen's Avatar
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    Okay I have to bump this because I just saw Rashomon and he was fucking awesome. I could easily see Te-ISTp, probably sx/sp too and something E8-ish.
    "And above all, watch with glittering eyes the whole world around you because the greatest secrets are always hidden in the most unlikely places. Those who don't believe in magic will never find it." -Roald Dahl

    http://forum.socionix.com/
    It's pretty cool

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    eunice's Avatar
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    @ Galen: Yeah, you could consider catching Seven Samurai as well.

    I think someone suggested that he is ESTp in Kurosawa's thread, but he doesn't seem like an Se dominant type to me.
    Last edited by eunice; 06-27-2011 at 04:04 AM.

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    when you see the booty Galen's Avatar
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    holy fuck this guy is attractive
    the entire time I was watching rashomon I just wanted him in my bed
    knowing that thing gets to be my dual is abergauv;tagu;btkghaodtbg;kadergtha
    "And above all, watch with glittering eyes the whole world around you because the greatest secrets are always hidden in the most unlikely places. Those who don't believe in magic will never find it." -Roald Dahl

    http://forum.socionix.com/
    It's pretty cool

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    Snomunegot munenori2's Avatar
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    Actually he's ISTj. AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHHHHMINDFUCK!

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    when you see the booty Galen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by munenori2 View Post
    Actually he's ISTj. AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHHHHMINDFUCK!
    nice try buddy boy
    "And above all, watch with glittering eyes the whole world around you because the greatest secrets are always hidden in the most unlikely places. Those who don't believe in magic will never find it." -Roald Dahl

    http://forum.socionix.com/
    It's pretty cool

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    eunice's Avatar
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    Anyway, I happened to be reading an article about him, and it seems like he was commonly known as the "John Wayne of Japan".

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    A friend sent me a link on his interview:

    (Ok, shall stopped talking about him from now on.)


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    SLE - only based on photos

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    Glorious Member mu4's Avatar
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    I'm not sure if he's the John Wayne of the east, since John Wayne's acting range was pretty limited and Toshiro Mifune's acting range was huge.

    Clint Eastwood made a name playing the type of characters that Toshiro Mifune established and I think they're similar types. I type Clint as LSI.

    Quote Originally Posted by Toshiro
    Mifune's quickness of spirit and of action contrasted brilliantly with Kurosawa's meticulous approach to filmmaking, making them a team to be reckoned with. Kurosawa's series of films with Mifune marked the high point in both careers, with most of the incredible 16 films they made together regarded as cinema classics. The pair more-or-less created the wandering warrior archetype in Japanese (and world) cinema, and influenced actors and directors from Clint Eastwood to George Lucas.
    Take a look at how he is described.

    Quickness of spirit, he's also variably described as imposing, rough, loud, etc.

    I don't really see him as SLI, he never was the kind of quiet everyman actor that Gabin was. He always played someone impressive, clever, emotional and energetic.

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    Glorious Member mu4's Avatar
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    http://www.criterion.com/explore/120-jean-gabin

    This is the actor generally characterized as a prototype of SLI and imo he is a very good example of a SLI.

    Stoic, quiet, intense. I think this is more characteristic of a SLI then someone like Toshiro Mifune who fulfills all the characteristics of a SLE in his behavior, actions, acting and etc.

    I think some of the scenes in his movies invoke the kind of primal energy that are displayed by Marlon Brando in his movies, although I think Marlon is a Se-subtype while Toshiro is a Ti subtype.

    Toshiro
    http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q...w=1920&bih=913

    Gabin

    http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q...w=1920&bih=913

    Compare the google images search between Gabin and Mifune, one is raw energy, the other stoic intensity.

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    eunice's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hkkmr View Post
    I'm not sure if he's the John Wayne of the east, since John Wayne's acting range was pretty limited and Toshiro Mifune's acting range was huge.

    Clint Eastwood made a name playing the type of characters that Toshiro Mifune established and I think they're similar types. I type Clint as LSI.

    Quote Originally Posted by Toshiro
    Mifune's quickness of spirit and of action contrasted brilliantly with Kurosawa's meticulous approach to filmmaking, making them a team to be reckoned with. Kurosawa's series of films with Mifune marked the high point in both careers, with most of the incredible 16 films they made together regarded as cinema classics. The pair more-or-less created the wandering warrior archetype in Japanese (and world) cinema, and influenced actors and directors from Clint Eastwood to George Lucas.
    Take a look at how he is described.

    Quickness of spirit, he's also variably described as imposing, rough, loud, etc.

    I don't really see him as SLI, he never was the kind of quiet everyman actor that Gabin was. He always played someone impressive, clever, emotional and energetic.
    To a certain extent, I find Mifune's acting to be not very versatile as compared to actors from a Ti/Fe quadra as the characters he had played best in tend to be rather individualistic and aggressive, and he hardly went beyond that type of role.

    I was reading a biography ("The Emperor and the Wolf") on him and there was anecdotes by fellow cast members who had worked closely with him. In his private life, he had been described as a rather quiet and stoic person who tends to be like one-to-one conversations with people whom he likes. In addition, he initially did not want to be an actor and had wanted to be a cameraman as he had preferred a career with less limelight. He eventually took up the job to be an actor as he was more concerned about paying his bills rather than striving to be famous and have everyone know his name.

    Putting him in comparison with Bruce Lee (Ti-ESTp), Lee was much more versatile in his acting as he had taken and seemed to perform well in varied filming roles given to him during the period before he went over to the States and became well-known for his fighting roles. Unlike Mifune, Lee is conscious about his status and strived to make himself well-known to the world. The movie "Bruce Lee, My Brother" is perhaps a fitting example of a young Ti-ESTp, and the portrayal of Lee has been regarded by many as relatively accurate since it was shared by his family.

    Moreover, having watched some interviews of Mifune, he seemed to strike me as someone who is rather dry and monotonous in his delivery. In addition, in the video which I had attached in this thread, he seemed to respond to the interviewer's questions matter-of-factly and did not have the tendency to try to engage with the others around him. He seems like someone who is not concerned and affected by the response around him, unlike ESTps. I would probably regard Bruce Lee as a more playful and engaging person than him:



    Compared with


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    Memory of Tomorrow Reuben's Avatar
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    I would have to agree with Eunice. The roles he play, while not the typical SLI ones, do exemplify a lot of Te values. Energetic, clever, impressive. A lot of ESTj's or ENTj's do seem that way to me. Hence Te subtype fits him very well. There is also a lack of better alternative. We all agree that he is ST. What we also know is that Se just does not fit his character because he is in nature stoic and quiet. LSI then seems like a possible alternative, but they are Fe-seeking, which is very different from Mifune's character.

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    Glorious Member mu4's Avatar
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    The public person is a more likely a indicator of type then the private person. Typing people's ego functions by how they behave privately is usually a bad idea because we are far more likely to freely display our non-ego functions in close relationships.

    Also SLE-Ti types can be quite stoic and cold in many situations,.

    Quote Originally Posted by SLE-ti
    Victor Gulenko
    Quote Originally Posted by SLE-ti

    Prefer to remain in the shadows, not to demonstrate their aspirations, but constantly hold their hands on the pulse of all proceedings around them. Outwardly appears balanced and phlegmatic. Before acting, checks all versions of possible consequences and only then enters into the game. Distrustful and careful, skeptic, conservative and realistic. Because they are not very sociable, may appear to be introverted. If they have their aim on a victim, they act slowly, by the method of the "compressive ring".

    Meged/Ovcharov

    The logical subtype constructs an impression of quiet force and confidence for themselves. They are rational and sequential in affairs; hardworking and hardy. Usually appear cool, sustained and collected, however, in moments of irritation they express their fury in demonstratively sharp, absolute gestures. Within a quiet atmosphere they are kind and polite, while keeping the interlocutor at a distance. Their humor is sharp, sometimes rude, and they bare a quick, mistrustful glare from under their eyebrows. They’re kind but also serious and guarded. Their gait and gestures appear harmonious, smooth and precise. Tends to dress rather monotonously, however, from time to time can also clothe themselves brightly, even extravagantly. Appreciate quality in apparel and often creates many outfits from a few articles. Thus they show concern for both their behaviour and appearance; though they often seem cold and inaccessible they themselves try to appear proper, equal and benevolent, while maintaining their advantages.
    Take a look at another interview with him.

    http://geraldpeary.com/interviews/mno/mifune.html

    Quote Originally Posted by Article
    We are talking at the Montreal International Film Festival. Throughout our interview, Mifune, 65, is as excited as a hyperactive juvenile, jumping up from his seat, racing around his Montreal hotel room to punctuate his anecdotes, breaking into imaginary swordfights and samurai battles, and in general tiring out his poor Japanese-to-English translator, who simply can't keep up with him. This awesome energy is Mifune's trademark. As Kurosawa wrote in his 1982 memoir, Something Like an Autobiography. "It was, above all, the speed with which he [Mifune] expressed himself that was astounding. The ordinary Japanese actor might need ten feet of film to get across an impression; Mifune needed three feet..." As if he had never told the story before, Mifune jubilantly recounts the day of his discovery. He grabs a straight-backed chair and plays himself at the age of 25, right out of the military, sitting gruffly before Toho judges.
    "One judge asked me to laugh," Mifune recalls, "I said, 'Why should I laugh? Nothing is funny.' Another judge said, "Get angry.' I answered, 'Why should I get angry?' I got so disgusted that, instead of being proper, I acted bored. They said, 'Get out.'"
    Fortunately for the future of international cinema, an actress named Takamine Hideka had observed the audition. During the lunch break, she raced elsewhere at Toho to Kurosawa and told the director about this fantastic unformed actor she had observed. Kurosawa sat in on the afternoon part of the audition.
    "They asked me the same dumb questions," Mifune says, "so I let it all out at them, every foul word. 'Goddamn SOBs!'" The judges were more put off, but Kurosawa was transfixed. As he said in his autobiography, " A young man was reeling around the room in a violent frenzy.... I found this young man strangely attractive."
    Kurosawa attended the jury meeting afterward, and he lobbied mightily for Mifune. Several judges switched their negative votes: Mifune squeezed through to be hired as a Toho actor. He played a violent bak robber in Senkichi Taniguchi's To the End of the Silver Mountains, a gangster boss in Kajiro Yamomoto's New Age of Fools, and finally, in 1948, a memorably rendered racketeer in Drunken Angel for Kurosawa. It was with Rashomon in 1951, the first Japanese film to make an impact in the West, that both Kurosawa and Mifune became globally recognized.
    Rashomon won the Golden Lion at the Venice Film Festival, and also an Academy Award for Best Foreign Film. Mifune became associated forever with his period role as the swaggering macho bandit. "Rashomon was a failure in Japan," Mifune says. "We had no idea that it had been submitted to Venice. Kurosawa didn't go to the festival, neither did I. And hardly anyone [at home] knew it won the grand prize. There was a small article in a Japanese newspaper, that was all."
    In 1952, Mifune performed for another cinema master, Kenzi Mizoguchi, considered my many modern film critics to be the greatest Japanese director of all. For The Life of Oharu, Mifune remembers Mizoguchi saying the first day, "Mr. Mifune, you have done films with Kurosawa for years. There is nothing I can instruct you. Do what you think is right."
    Mizoguchi died in 1954, but Mifune remembers him well, and offers a rare glimpse of Mizoguchi on the set. "He was a rather complex person and a perfectionist," Mifune says. "A scene with a famous actress wasn't going so well, so Mizoguchi dismissed everyone for the day so they could quietly talk. He was a stickler for props. If an object was to be used in the movie for tea time, he might look at it and say, 'This is a reproduction!' He would close down the set and order the prop man, 'Get the original in Kyoto.'"
    For the benefit of the interviewer, Mifune improvises an extraordinary, once-in-a-lifetime Mizoguchi imitation. He lowers eyeglasses to pinch his nose and squats to examine an imaginary prop, grumbling in Japanese that the prop isn't right! "Mizoguchi was an artist, a professional," Mifune says with respect, standing upright.
    Did Mifune and Kurosawa ever quarrel on the set?
    "Yes, on Yojimbo," he admits. "One day Kurosawa said, 'I won't mention names, but the actors are late.' I said. 'What are you talking about? I'm the actor.' Every day after that, when Kurosawa arrived, I would be there already, in costume and makeup from 6 a.m. I showed him."
    A quarter century later, Mifune still smarts from this insult to his dignity. "No matter how much I drank the night before," Mifune says, "I never once was late on his films. But with Kurosawa, sometimes people are waiting, and he never shows up. The people go to his house, and he says, 'I'm sorry. I don't feel well today.'"
    What is the secret of Mifune's well-being?
    He chortles. "I still ride horses and do a lot of laughing. But I was born this way. I can't help it. When I was young, I played old men's roles. But now I'm a little boy!"
    Does this person seem SLI to you?

    Sit down interview gets you some information about a person, and can be very helpful in typing but know that when a person is stuck in a chair and a camera on them they might hide a little.

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    Memory of Tomorrow Reuben's Avatar
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    @hkkmr

    Thanks for your well-substantiated insights again. Yes I'm beginning to consider SLE-Ti now. I realized that I only focused on a few aspects of his personality; too few to actually make an informed conclusion. As of now, I am rather convinced that he is an Se-dominant type. His energy is very different from Te energy: it is wild, irrational, unpredictable. Furthermore, people associate him with power, strength, and dominance. This is very, very different from Si-dominants that we often hear about.

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