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Thread: INTjs experiencing fear

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    Dioklecian's Avatar
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    Default INTjs experiencing fear

    UDP says that INTPs are based on fear, could that be true for INTJs too?

    Is it a different kind of fear?
    Well I am back. How's everyone? Don't have as much time now, but glad to see some of the old gang are still here.

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    Fear is usually specific----fear of what?
    "To become is just like falling asleep. You never know exactly when it happens, the transition, the magic, and you think, if you could only recall that exact moment of crossing the line then you would understand everything; you would see it all"

    "Angels dancing on the head of a pin dissolve into nothingness at the bedside of a dying child."

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    fear would be the negative representation. what of seeking? another way to interpret fear would be as doubt and doubt as inquiry

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    Default Re: INTJs and fear

    Quote Originally Posted by Dioklecian
    UDP says that INTPs are based on fear, could that be true for INTJs too?

    Is it a different kind of fear?

    ...... Hmm, I'm trying to recall the context of what I said.

    Perhaps I meant that I (subjective) have seen how INTps use fear as a way to fuel their functioning, such in the way "they" can "cling" to "logic". I don't necessarily think it's limited to one type or INTps in general - (I can only imagine how many when they first saw this...). Or perhaps it is my personal interaction with them. I imagine that I could equally seem "afraid" in terms of my use of "logic" through the eyes of an INTp. In fact, I have been in situations where this is confirmed.

    INTjs could use fear as motivation as well. ALl people could. Fear of impurity, of acting greatly improperly, of not knowing something you should know, of health, etc etc etc.


    But I wonder what the real question is that you have, or at least as to the root of your current query.
    Pre-2013 post are written with incomplete understanding.

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    Hi guys,

    Well I first of all wanted to know more about what you meant UDP, I mean how INTPs use fear. But if they use fear as motivation then INTJs should have another motivation that plays the same role. What is it?

    I have a big problem with motivating myself, hence my question.
    Well I am back. How's everyone? Don't have as much time now, but glad to see some of the old gang are still here.

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    Creepy-

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    Hmm...

    I have ("had") a very hard time motivating myself. I stay away from emotions as much as possible, though, because I'm just not meant to deal with them, especially in such a way

    (Which is why I find claims of me being an INFp to be particularly foolish).


    What is your type, Dioklician? I don't remember what you said it was a while ago.


    My suggestion for you is to pick up Stephen Coveys "The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People". I think it would be good for an INTj or anyone who likes structure orientated thinking. I have it on audiobook (library was out of regular books), and I like it thus far.

    Specifically, Habit 2 (I'm only up to 3, though).

    You create a 'mission statement', or constitution, or bluprint for yourself, and then base all your actions off of it. For an INTj, having a plan or something like that to refer to and guide yourself with, I suspect it would be very useful.

    It is best, especially, if you can create it when you are in a good state of mind, so that when things turn up oddly, you can go back to that thing that you created in a good state of mind. That is extrapolation there on my part, but I think it has some truth to it.

    One thing that motivates me is being shown the truth. If I'm slacking off or putting things off, then just becoming fully aware of it and not intuitionally saying "yeah... I can do that later" or "it's not so great a thing, it's under control", so that way I don't procrastinate or whatever.


    If you want to talk about discipline and motivation, though, I'm all ears, because I'm doing a sort of personal experiment/project along those regards for the next three months, sort of. DOC project - development of character. I picked up "the seven habits..." without knowing of it's emphasis on character (I saw it in a book store a while ago, and it ended up in my large "fishnet" when I went to the library last time).


    When I spoke to wym123 about this subject, he reminded me of Squall almost, or as tcaulding once refered to a IxTJ crosstype. A very disciplined INTJ. Wym basically said that he didn't use or need much motivation, but also that perhaps he had other issues because he was overly focused on 'getting things done' and work ethic.

    I think Covey's book, though, would be good for you. I like it so far.

    Perhaps, Dioklecian, you are around a similar stage as I am or was.

    A I said before, though... I cannot use fear as motivation. I see through it. I don't really know if I could ever have a "Griever"....

    But then again, maybe I just (didn't) have the courage to step up and commit and say "Hey, I'm going to be really disciplined about this." or whatever. "I'm going to get 100s this year" (in HS). I never wanted to commit all the way, into one role or another. Part of motivation, for me, as per Covey's book, seems to be fully accepting and walking into a "role", even if it is an sort of 'pretend' one (my thoughts, not his).

    NOTE: The more this post went on, the more diverse and less centered my conversation went. I swung through various tangents.

  7. #7
    Creepy-

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    http://www.socionics.us/philosophy/ego.shtml
    Socionics :: Awakening the Ego


    That 'helped me' think about motivation.

    What I can contribute for society, preparing myself to benefit society, to make some sort of contrabution to the future or human progress, those all help motivate.

    Looking at the big picture.

    Specifically, for my DOC project, 'preparing myself so that I can best contribute to society' was/is a big factor. Furthermore, I have to become the change(s) I want to see in the world, so to say.


    Social responsibility can be an important factor. Initially in the audiobook, Covey talks about how "what if you had to teached what you learned [here in this program, today] tomorrow, to a large audience? Would that affect how you consider the material? Would it affect how you learn?" something like that. He spoke about the 'responsibility' involved, and furthermore it was an elaboration of how changing one's role ( or paradigm shift) changes how you relate to things. etc. etc etc. I'm being breif here, but that is waht I was reminded of

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