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Thread: Function Development and Purpose

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    Default Function Development and Purpose

    At first I thought it was ludicrous to believe that our brain works in ordered manner with set rules. However, I now know that that is the way that our D.N.A. works and without structure, there is no way that life could even exist (At least that is what they tell us). It is natural for our brain to develop an ordered system to determine behaviour patterns. That would mean that every function has little to no correlation with how our brain developed or it's strengths, but it deals with how our brain reacts to the environment or set circumstances. There might of been several functions that are practically non-existant at this moment and some of the functions that are present today were unheard of at the past. That means that the 8 functions that we use today represent the end result of the human condition over millions of years.

    To get to the point, I believe that a function is basically a message that travels across the brain. The difference between each function is that it travels in specific areas of the brain in a certain pattern in order to develop the ability to use that function in real life. Each of these 8 functions is used by every person, but encrypted in everyone's D.N.A. is the preference to use some functions more than others. I am now beginning to understand why introverted judgement is followed by extraverted perceiving. That is because it will conflict with the other pathways in similar regions resulting in a chaotic disturbance in the brain. I believe the reason that certain functions are preferred over others is mainly because that our brain can exert more energy and strength into that function. This will result in a much higher rate of usefulness and ability. If all of the functions were equally divided, then there would be very little influence from each function and our behaviour would be very minimalized and weak.

    *I hope all of you can be open with me on this topic. If you disagree with me on this matter, I will welcome your criticism if you give me an explanation of why I am wrong. I'd like to understand this matter even further and this is only possible with insight and criticism.*
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    I wouldn't know enough about neuroscience to comment on the theory, but there are 8 functions, not 16.
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    I think the main question is - do the functions really use different patterns/regions in the brain?
    It would be logical if they did. Then the person who has Fe-program, for example, has a very well-developed part of the brain, which is needed for Fe. In this case another person who uses Te will have a different region of the brain which is well-developed.

    There are all sorts of games for children which promise to make the child more smarter in different areas (trains the child verbally/spatially/etc). Child's brain will start to have some regions of the brain, which have more connections between neurons. The kid will have less trouble using this part of the brain, so he will use it more and more, hence letting one part of the brain develop more quickly than others. So when the small child is solving the first problems, how will he decide which approach is the best (which function to use, which part of the brain to train). I guess this is genetic. ...or it could be more about what functions the parents use when being around that child...

    I agree that if the child used different regions to solve the problems, he would end up adequate in the use of each function, but wouldn't really be strong in any. Also, that kid would end up in the asylum, because many functions are mutually exclusive and the solutions can't be used at the same time. Using Fe and Te to solve a problem will give opposite results and the person would have to choose every time (with no reason to choose one over the other). Sounds awful.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kristiina
    I think the main question is - do the functions really use different patterns/regions in the brain?
    It would be logical if they did. Then the person who has Fe-program, for example, has a very well-developed part of the brain, which is needed for Fe. In this case another person who uses Te will have a different region of the brain which is well-developed.

    There are all sorts of games for children which promise to make the child more smarter in different areas (trains the child verbally/spatially/etc). Child's brain will start to have some regions of the brain, which have more connections between neurons. The kid will have less trouble using this part of the brain, so he will use it more and more, hence letting one part of the brain develop more quickly than others. So when the small child is solving the first problems, how will he decide which approach is the best (which function to use, which part of the brain to train). I guess this is genetic. ...or it could be more about what functions the parents use when being around that child...

    I agree that if the child used different regions to solve the problems, he would end up adequate in the use of each function, but wouldn't really be strong in any. Also, that kid would end up in the asylum, because many functions are mutually exclusive and the solutions can't be used at the same time. Using Fe and Te to solve a problem will give opposite results and the person would have to choose every time (with no reason to choose one over the other). Sounds awful.
    That does sound logical; it is really a shame that the measurements of brain activity have so far failed to ascertain any such spatial relation. So, it's either that the brains defy logic, or the functions do not exist as detectable entities. Somehow, the latter seems so much more logical, that it's not even funny. After all, they are a part of a pseudo-mathematical model, and only attempt to mimic the reality, but not necessarily depict it. As part of the model, they are at best correlated with reality; this does not mean that they actually exist as such--think of any inertial force (such as centirfugal): they don't actually exist, but do explain the behavior of objects in accellerated reference frames very well.
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    It is possible, that the functions are not in brain regions, but more in the patterns... The electricity will go through certain brain cells, but it can't be measured with such accuracy.

    In order to see the functions in the brain, we must know exactly how the neurons pass the signal to the next cell and how exactly a thought is manufactured through that. Maybe my knowledge is outdated, but I don't think scientists know that.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kristiina
    It is possible, that the functions are not in brain regions, but more in the patterns... The electricity will go through certain brain cells, but it can't be measured with such accuracy.

    In order to see the functions in the brain, we must know exactly how the neurons pass the signal to the next cell and how exactly a thought is manufactured through that. Maybe my knowledge is outdated, but I don't think scientists know that.
    I agree with you on this.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Joy
    I wouldn't know enough about neuroscience to comment on the theory, but there are 8 functions, not 16.
    That was a type error, I have edited it that part.

    Quote Originally Posted by Kristiina
    It is possible, that the functions are not in brain regions, but more in the patterns... The electricity will go through certain brain cells, but it can't be measured with such accuracy.

    In order to see the functions in the brain, we must know exactly how the neurons pass the signal to the next cell and how exactly a thought is manufactured through that. Maybe my knowledge is outdated, but I don't think scientists know that.
    Exactly, this is what I was attempting to relay to everyone in my original post. I believe that each function is actually a path of electricity (perhaps something else) that travels in a pre-determined path through specific regions of the brain. To make this theory more visible: Imagine an electrical current travelling first through the visual cortex that contains information obtained through the senses. Afterwards, it travels through the lower right side of the prefrontal cortex and then to the amygdala. This entire process can be labelled as introverted intuition. The individual has noticed an image and processed it through the visual cortex for it to be transformed into a more complex pattern to be deciphered. The visual cortex recognizes that the image requires as something that requires prefrontal cortex analysis. The prefrontal cortex learns that the image obtained is signifying a threat or a opportunity and immediately sends this to the amygdala, which is translated into a "gut feeling".

    This whole process lasts about a few seconds. Of course, it is not the regions of the brain that create the function, but the process that it must go through. If the visual cortex had diverted the image to another region of the brain, then a much more different premise would have arised. A function such as extraverted feeling is techinically the designated road imprinted in the brain in order to achieve a result required for a situation. There are 8 different pathways that for whatever reason have conquered over possibly 256 functions or more as a result of their practicality. Every individual uses each of these pathways, but 2 of them dominate in order to achieve more highly accurate and developed results. The functions that are used more frequently become stronger over time with usage and more efficient. Most importantly, the functions depend on the regions of the brain development that have nothing to do with the functions themselves, but are depended on by the functions to achieve promising results.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Traveler
    Quote Originally Posted by Joy
    I wouldn't know enough about neuroscience to comment on the theory, but there are 8 functions, not 16.
    That was a type error, I have edited it that part.

    Quote Originally Posted by Kristiina
    It is possible, that the functions are not in brain regions, but more in the patterns... The electricity will go through certain brain cells, but it can't be measured with such accuracy.

    In order to see the functions in the brain, we must know exactly how the neurons pass the signal to the next cell and how exactly a thought is manufactured through that. Maybe my knowledge is outdated, but I don't think scientists know that.
    Exactly, this is what I was attempting to relay to everyone in my original post. I believe that each function is actually a path of electricity (perhaps something else) that travels in a pre-determined path through specific regions of the brain. To make this theory more visible: Imagine an electrical current travelling first through the visual cortex that contains information obtained through the senses. Afterwards, it travels through the lower right side of the prefrontal cortex and then to the amygdala. This entire process can be labelled as introverted intuition. The individual has noticed an image and processed it through the visual cortex for it to be transformed into a more complex pattern to be deciphered. The visual cortex recognizes that the image requires as something that requires prefrontal cortex analysis. The prefrontal cortex learns that the image obtained is signifying a threat or a opportunity and immediately sends this to the amygdala, which is translated into a "gut feeling".

    This whole process lasts about a few seconds. Of course, it is not the regions of the brain that create the function, but the process that it must go through. If the visual cortex had diverted the image to another region of the brain, then a much more different premise would have arised. A function such as extraverted feeling is techinically the designated road imprinted in the brain in order to achieve a result required for a situation. There are 8 different pathways that for whatever reason have conquered over possibly 256 functions or more as a result of their practicality. Every individual uses each of these pathways, but 2 of them dominate in order to achieve more highly accurate and developed results. The functions that are used more frequently become stronger over time with usage and more efficient. Most importantly, the functions depend on the regions of the brain development that have nothing to do with the functions themselves, but are depended on by the functions to achieve promising results.
    That is a novel idea.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tcaudilllg
    Quote Originally Posted by Traveler
    Quote Originally Posted by Joy
    I wouldn't know enough about neuroscience to comment on the theory, but there are 8 functions, not 16.
    That was a type error, I have edited it that part.

    Quote Originally Posted by Kristiina
    It is possible, that the functions are not in brain regions, but more in the patterns... The electricity will go through certain brain cells, but it can't be measured with such accuracy.

    In order to see the functions in the brain, we must know exactly how the neurons pass the signal to the next cell and how exactly a thought is manufactured through that. Maybe my knowledge is outdated, but I don't think scientists know that.
    Exactly, this is what I was attempting to relay to everyone in my original post. I believe that each function is actually a path of electricity (perhaps something else) that travels in a pre-determined path through specific regions of the brain. To make this theory more visible: Imagine an electrical current travelling first through the visual cortex that contains information obtained through the senses. Afterwards, it travels through the lower right side of the prefrontal cortex and then to the amygdala. This entire process can be labelled as introverted intuition. The individual has noticed an image and processed it through the visual cortex for it to be transformed into a more complex pattern to be deciphered. The visual cortex recognizes that the image requires as something that requires prefrontal cortex analysis. The prefrontal cortex learns that the image obtained is signifying a threat or a opportunity and immediately sends this to the amygdala, which is translated into a "gut feeling".

    This whole process lasts about a few seconds. Of course, it is not the regions of the brain that create the function, but the process that it must go through. If the visual cortex had diverted the image to another region of the brain, then a much more different premise would have arised. A function such as extraverted feeling is techinically the designated road imprinted in the brain in order to achieve a result required for a situation. There are 8 different pathways that for whatever reason have conquered over possibly 256 functions or more as a result of their practicality. Every individual uses each of these pathways, but 2 of them dominate in order to achieve more highly accurate and developed results. The functions that are used more frequently become stronger over time with usage and more efficient. Most importantly, the functions depend on the regions of the brain development that have nothing to do with the functions themselves, but are depended on by the functions to achieve promising results.
    That is a novel idea.
    Thanks, that is because this theory was created through understanding the process of functions solely through self-analysis and my own possibilities of how the brain functions.
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