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Thread: Anti-authoritarian parenting style and socionics types

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    Default Anti-authoritarian parenting style and socionics types

    My theory is that either those types who don't value or irrational types (because of the usually more 'democratic' leadership style) are prone to use this parenting style. I rather think it's connected to the first possibility.

    I'm personally very sceptical of this, even if most people don't prefer this parenting style anymore. It's doesn't help children to learn the typical social behaviour, on the contrary, they often become tyrannic and reject any form of authority or order. But these are necessary things in a working environment.

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    i'd have to know more precisely what you mean by "anti-authoritarian" to comment with much specificity, but i could see a possible trend here. i tend to be more on the liberal side in my parenting behavior and i also remember slackermom saying something about this. (i think on the wiki, so idk if its still there?) as for my own parents, though, my LII dad was extremely authoritarian and my IEI mom didn't really believe in rules at all, so its not a trend i would use to type with very conclusively.

    edit: i was just thinking of Se valuing...taking rationality/irrationality into account as you did, my parents behavior would still fit into your theory, ya.

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    Anti-authoritarian parents are neurotic.

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    ok, i don't think i know what anti-authoritarian parenting means.

    a couple things, though. i think an overly authoritarian parenting style is also likely to push a kid to reject authority and a more moderate environment is optimal. and i'm trying to figure out what was meant by the working environment comment...would you say that the primary responsibility of a parent is to prepare their children for the work world?

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    I don't have children, but when I will, I'll definitely try to be as anti-authoritarian as I can (obviously, this means that I will have to be authoritarian if they're really crossing the line...). I wouldn't mind if my children disliked the "typical social order". I dislike it myself, in many ways.

    Besides, I also strongly believe in "nature over nurture" when it comes to character development. I've seen horrible children / men coming out of absolutely normal/perfect families, and vice versa. Probably, something which might be equally (if not more) important would be checking out who they end up befriending, even though ultimately such a thing can't be controlled, either.

    My parents are ISxjs and I believe they are not particularly authoritarian. They probably didn't need to be, either, since I've never displayed particularly wild behavioral tendencies.

    My "pet theory" is that ExTx children have the worst response to authoritarian parenting, while IxFx children have the "best" response. I have an ESTp acquaintance, which I could otherwise define as psychologically "fine", which set his own house on fire when he was 10-11, in response to a strong quarrel with his father.
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    Question #1: Anti-Authoritarian = ?

    A) Anal and way too authoritative of their kids

    B) Lax and not authoritative of their kids at all

    C) Anarchic and actively fighting "authorities" in their lives

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    Quote Originally Posted by CILi View Post
    Question #1: Anti-Authoritarian = ?

    A) Anal and way too authoritative of their kids

    B) Lax and not authoritative of their kids at all

    C) Anarchic and actively fighting "authorities" in their lives
    I would say B) with an implied hint of C).
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    Quote Originally Posted by laghlagh View Post
    i'd have to know more precisely what you mean by "anti-authoritarian" to comment with much specificity, but i could see a possible trend here.
    Hmm, I just noticed there isn't even an english Wikipedia article about that... well, at least as far as I can see. Anti-authoritarian parents believe it's utterly wrong to set certain rules for the child. There are different characteristics for this behaviour. Some might treat their children as equals (as if they already were grown-up and fully aware of every consequence of their actions) or others who seem to ignore parenting at all and leave their childrens development to chance (which is the worst case).

    Quote Originally Posted by laghlagh View Post
    a couple things, though. i think an overly authoritarian parenting style is also likely to push a kid to reject authority and a more moderate environment is optimal. and i'm trying to figure out what was meant by the working environment comment...
    Overly authoritarian parenting often causes the children to become authoritarians in their later life, some might even use physical punishment, which I absolutely reject. Authoritarian parenting is actually about as bad as the anti-a style. There is middle way of parenting, which is still based on the parents as authorities, but unfortunately, there is no appropriate english term to describe it.

    Quote Originally Posted by laghlagh View Post
    would you say that the primary responsibility of a parent is to prepare their children for the work world?
    I expected this question. The answer ist no, of course not. But it's important to show the child how it should deal with real-life problems and so on.

    Quote Originally Posted by FDG View Post
    I would say B) with an implied hint of C).
    Correct.

    My parents are ISxjs and I believe they are not particularly authoritarian. They probably didn't need to be, either, since I've never displayed particularly wild behavioral tendencies.
    It's exactly the same in my case.
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    My style has been to seek a balance. It is important for parents to maintain some authority over their children, but in a way that encourages them to safely develop their independence over time.

    For example, my 3 yo is told point-blank not to go into the street without holding an adult's hand. This is to keep him safe, as he does not yet understand all the fine points of crossing the street or how to do so safely every time. When he is older, however, he will know enough to safely cross the street by himself. I won't be making him hold my hand still when he's eight.
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    Quote Originally Posted by FDG View Post
    My parents are ISxjs and I believe they are not particularly authoritarian. They probably didn't need to be, either, since I've never displayed particularly wild behavioral tendencies.
    This was me, too. I had a lot of freedom as a kid, that my ESFp sister did not because she was much more prone to "push the envelope" in a way that could have gotten her into trouble.

    My "pet theory" is that ExTx children have the worst response to authoritarian parenting, while IxFx children have the "best" response. I have an ESTp acquaintance, which I could otherwise define as psychologically "fine", which set his own house on fire when he was 10-11, in response to a strong quarrel with his father.
    This is something that scares me, having an ESTp child. He is so strong-willed. He responds to my discipline pretty well, as long as I am reasonable and consistent with him. But, he certainly has no qualms about getting physical, and he is constantly forcing me to push back with my Role Se, which gets old really quick. And it's hard to be consistent every time. And his ILI daddy has even less control over him than I do.

    He will hit or shove his baby brother until he starts to cry. And when I ask him why he did it, he says, "Because I like to!" He enjoys arousing an emotional reaction out of other people. And it doesn't help, I suppose, that neither his daddy nor I are Fe-valuing.

    So, in our household, neither my husband or I swear or use foul language-- EVER. And yet, the other day Daddy was driving home with our son and he started screaming the F-word over and over at the top of his lungs! Yep, he's going to be an interesting challenge, that boy...
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    Just to make this clear: I don't support authoritarian parents. As I said above it's as contraproductive as people who raise their child in an anti-authoritarian way, in my opinion. Here is a picture which maybe illustrates the general situation better:



    Key:
    caption: parenting styles
    up/down: warmth/affection (devotion)
    left/right: control/guidance
    red: permissive
    blue: neglecting
    yellow: 'authoritative'
    green: authoritarian
    (the words in yellow and green seem to be synomyms in English. In German, the maybe aren't, even if I never heard the yellow one before as a special term.)
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    Quote Originally Posted by MegaDoomer View Post
    Overly authoritarian parenting often causes the children to become authoritarians in their later life, some might even use physical punishment, which I absolutely reject. Authoritarian parenting is actually about as bad as the anti-a style. There is middle way of parenting, which is still based on the parents as authorities, but unfortunately, there is no appropriate english term to describe it.
    according to a psychology class i was in, the middle way is termed authoritative. there were studies cited where it was shown that permissive parenting is least effective and authoritative is most effective. i dont know how exactly that was measured, though. i feel kind of silly for not mentioning this earlier, lol.

    Quote Originally Posted by pianosinger View Post
    My style has been to seek a balance. It is important for parents to maintain some authority over their children, but in a way that encourages them to safely develop their independence over time.

    For example, my 3 yo is told point-blank not to go into the street without holding an adult's hand. This is to keep him safe, as he does not yet understand all the fine points of crossing the street or how to do so safely every time. When he is older, however, he will know enough to safely cross the street by himself. I won't be making him hold my hand still when he's eight.
    this seems like the sanest kind of parenting imo.

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    Ah, yeah well I believe "authoritative" exists in english as separate from "authoritarian"...(the latter being pejorative).
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    Quote Originally Posted by pianosinger View Post
    My style has been to seek a balance. It is important for parents to maintain some authority over their children, but in a way that encourages them to safely develop their independence over time.
    Quote Originally Posted by laghlagh View Post
    according to a psychology class i was in, the middle way is termed authoritative.
    Yep, that's what I mean.

    Quote Originally Posted by FDG View Post
    Ah, yeah well I believe "authoritative" exists in english as separate from "authoritarian"...(the latter being pejorative).
    Okay, my typical online dictionary listed it as a synomym.
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    I think reason should be the primary authority in parenting. I could see myself being somewhat authoritarian, but not outside of reason. I don't think I could ever be the "because I said so" kind of parent.

    Also, I've always thought that "you'll understand when your older" is a bullshit control technique as well. I think that all things can be understood if you take enough time to explain. But, I guess it does take a certain level of maturity to be willing to try to understand.
    Last edited by Azeroffs; 12-06-2010 at 07:54 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Azeroffs View Post
    I don't think I could ever be the "because I said so" kind of parent.
    I thought that, too. And I really try not to use that phrase. But, sometimes...it's the only thing I can say because the real reason is too difficult to explain to my 3 yo's limited understanding and I'd rather not be pulling out random half-truths, or saying something that could give my kid nightmares, kwim?
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    Quote Originally Posted by pianosinger View Post
    But, sometimes...it's the only thing I can say because the real reason is too difficult to explain to my 3 yo's limited understanding and I'd rather not be pulling out random half-truths, or saying something that could give my kid nightmares, kwim?
    And this is the reason why you can't treat a child as an equal if you're a parent. The understanding is limited and it can't overview everything. People should mind the wishes and concerns of the child, but they always need to be the authority.
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    Quote Originally Posted by pianosinger View Post
    I thought that, too. And I really try not to use that phrase. But, sometimes...it's the only thing I can say because the real reason is too difficult to explain to my 3 yo's limited understanding and I'd rather not be pulling out random half-truths, or saying something that could give my kid nightmares, kwim?
    i relate to this. and it makes me think of how before my son was born i had this image in my head of us being equals and giving him all this input and allowance to compromise so he wouldn't feel too small, how he wouldn't rebel because he would never feel the need to, like this utopia, lol. but...it really doesn't work that way with children, because they have minds of children. they just can't handle the responsibility of having too much say in their own welfare. and i don't like saying that "out loud" because it feels so..harsh and mean or something, lol, but its just the plain truth.

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    I was raised in an extremely authoritarian home, in an extremely authoritarian religious environment. What was drilled into my parents' heads, and thus greatly influenced how they raised me and my siblings was that they were responsible for every mistake their kids made, and that it was a reflection on them as parents, and as people if their kids were not perfect in every way. And if there were not very strict rules and very harsh punishments for breaking them (even "talking back" could result in a nice beating) then they were not "doing their duty" as parents.

    This idea of kids as part of their parents, that if they mess up, the parents have messed up sets up a structure where parenting with love and guidance is replaced by pushing, strict standards, or just a very critical atmosphere, where you're watched for any sign of a screw-up.

    Kids need help and guidance in making good choices, finding their own way through life, developing their talents and growing as people. They can't do this on their own because they don't have the maturity or experience to know how to go about it. So, rules and guidlines, and examples are needed. A totally lax environment is one where the parents don't care enough about their kids to help them on their way, and a totally strict one is where the parents care so much about keeping the kids from doing anything wrong, that they forget that their job is to raise these little people into happy, self-responsible adults, not jam them into a mold that they'll never be able to live up to.
    Last edited by squark; 12-07-2010 at 01:00 AM.

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    In English there is very little difference in authoritative and authoritarian. Both are adjectives used to describe behavior which strongly emphasizes compliance to authority. Typically an institution is authoritarian (authoritarian government policies) and a person is authoritative (an authoritative parent).

    What is the distinction in the german language? And do the endings -tiv and -taer have any other usage in words?

    Also on the topic of parenting...

    I think its an issue of optimization, two far in either extreme and the parent is confronted with a complicated issue.

    Too much emphasis and submission to authority and a child, while extremely respectful of social institutions-- they may become too trusting of people in power, passive and unassertive.

    Too little emphasis on authority and a child develops a detachment from typical social organizations-- they may be difficult to work with by being unfamiliar with working as part of a social hierarchy or organized structure in which more experienced and competent members advise, oversee, and mentor newer members.

    I think its important for a parent to know how to balance themselves, look at the response their parenting style is having in their child's life, and thus taking into account their child's personality, they adapt to develop a successful method of parenting.

    There are also issues concerning the implementation of the parenting style, while a certain kid may require a more authoritarian parent-- there are certain means of exercising authority that can be negative and lead children to developing a bad relationship between themselves and authority that carries through to adulthood.

    Things such as using physical force and psychological manipulation are for example poor methods of exercising authority, likely while a certain kid may need an authoritative influence in their life to channel their energy productively, such methods will leave them with a bad concept of authority which will echo throughout their life.

    The role of mentors, teachers, role-models, parents and so forth are a major aspect to psychological development. Without good apprenticeship people's talents rarely end up amounting to anything. I tend to think most people who are unsuccessful generally have a lack of reliable human resources to draw on in their life.

    In reverse over-authoritarian parenting can influence children negatively, along with over-protective parenting. This leads to children that have a negative submissive attitude towards authority. They don't know how to express themselves and their needs and likely feel frustrated. Usually in the US this results from parents vicariously living through their children and/or the alarmist attitude which is generated by media-hype concerning threats to children. Usually this gives rise to unmotivated passive-aggressive adults.

    In upper-middle class white neighborhood the negative submissive attitude is common.

    In lower class ethnic neighborhoods the more traditional anti-authoritative attitude is common.

    Of course this is because the influence of authority is stronger as one moves up the socio-economic ladder as expected.

    Ideally everyone would of course live up to our own personal image of the perfect leader/boss/teacher, but rarely anyone does, so in real life don't look for perfection but potential.
    Last edited by male; 12-07-2010 at 02:49 AM.

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    Essays on Parenting, Families, and Procreation - Healing from Childhood Trauma

    Especially in the modern Western world, there are often no sharp distinctions between overly authoritarian and overly permissive parenting styles. There are parents who may at times be neglectful and self-absorbed; at other times relatively caring and loving; at other times emotionally unstable, angry, and even violent; etc.
    As a general rule, the most violent, criminal, and homicidal people had the least in terms of genuine love, caring, and honesty in early childhood, and were forced to undergo the greatest degrees of hypocrisy, poisonous pedagogy, violence, idiocy, magical thinking, etc. without a helping witness. Of course this may often not be solely attributable to the biological parents (despite the legacy of abuse often extending for generations in families), and whether or not the children are adopted, you still have to take into account their pre-birth experiences, birth experiences, what forms of separation or abandonment took place after birth and to what extent, what negative experiences took place due to medical technology and hospitals, and then you also have to factor in siblings, caregivers, random strangers, family members, babysitters, teachers, etc. And of course, all kinds of seemingly mundane and trivial things, ranging from parents' attitudes to their children to how they took care of them (whether they truly listened to them, took them seriously, respected them) and everything in between. Of course, the less enlightened and more traumatized the parent, the more likely they'll use their child as a "poison container" -- a receptacle for their buried emotions and repressed memories/traumas.
    Parents often unconsciously repeat the same parenting styles as their parents. If their parents had a bad parenting style, then they are less likely to have as bad a parenting style if they had a helping or enlightened witness. I think I read somewhere how they recorded mothers with their infant daughters, and then when those daughters grew up they also recorded them with their children, and they found that they acted the same way with their children that their mothers did with them.

    Psychohistory - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    The best and most recent child-rearing mode is the Helping Mode. '...helping children reach their own goals in life, rather than "socialize" them into fulfilling parental wishes. Less psychological manipulation, more unconditional love. Children raised in this way are far more empathic towards others in society than earlier generations.'

    CH 4 pp 132 - 146 - FOUNDATIONS OF PSYCHOHISTORY


    Another important point is that emotions and realities shouldn't be hidden, yet at the same time they shouldn't be unconsciously acted out on one's children in a destructive fashion. Often times, parents and family members are unable to take responsibility for their actions and mistakes, and it's their children who must pay the price. Of course, people who idealize oppression, lies, pain, suffering, hypocrisy, corruption, destructiveness, and/or violence gild it in a semblance of virtue and absurd righteousness and are experts at dissembling an open-minded, liberal, and/or socially responsible-caring-conscientious personality.

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    Quote Originally Posted by lazybones View Post
    The best and most recent child-rearing mode is the Helping Mode. '...helping children reach their own goals in life, rather than "socialize" them into fulfilling parental wishes. Less psychological manipulation, more unconditional love. Children raised in this way are far more empathic towards others in society than earlier generations.'
    ...gonna have to go ahead and call bs on that one. If it were the "best" mode, don'tcha think it would have been discovered before? Or at least that it would have occurred at least once before the twentieth century finally discovered, once and for all, how to raise children?

    All those quotes are nice and all... but they come from a place of rather obvious bias, which sort of irritates me...

    Anyway, with raising children, obviously I don't know what to do, and I'm not a parent yet so I have no way of finding out. But as with all things, the middle ground is probably the best one. Of course children need some discipline and guidance. And of course that can be taken overboard. Finding a balance is key. I'm not sure where that balance is though.
    Not a rule, just a trend.

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    Quote Originally Posted by silverchris9 View Post
    ...gonna have to go ahead and call bs on that one. If it were the "best" mode, don'tcha think it would have been discovered before? Or at least that it would have occurred at least once before the twentieth century finally discovered, once and for all, how to raise children?

    All those quotes are nice and all... but they come from a place of rather obvious bias, which sort of irritates me...

    Anyway, with raising children, obviously I don't know what to do, and I'm not a parent yet so I have no way of finding out. But as with all things, the middle ground is probably the best one. Of course children need some discipline and guidance. And of course that can be taken overboard. Finding a balance is key. I'm not sure where that balance is though.
    Well, a couple of points on this:

    Maybe the parent as helper is the quote-unquote best mode. It's the philosophy I've adopted with my child. Nonetheless, it's very, very difficult to do.

    What makes it the best? There's no such thing, perhaps, as a single best mode for all people and all times, but it may be the best way to parent in response to the current trend of human consciousness and western social pressures and needs.

    "They come from a place of obvious bias"--maybe. But what is the nature of the bias? I'm not sure I can articulate what the bias is.

    Even if the quoted material is more or less correct, it's idealistic, pointing to "what" rather than "how."

    The most common mainstream view of parenting styles I've seen recognizes three categories: authoritarian, authoritative, and permissive. The middle ground in this construct is the authoritative mode, in which the parent provides a strong psychological "container" for the child without breaking his/her spirit. That would be the how, I suppose.

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    Extremist positivists are always authoritarian: they go to extremes to see their child behave they way they want them to behave.

    Extreme negativists are always permissive: they feel they cannot (or should not) control their children.

    Authoritative is the goal; however there are multiple perspectives on permissive parenting.

    So it's mostly an issue with a political basis.

    Of course Ts will be a little stricter and colder than Fs. (although the coldness is not in itself acceptable... duality is important here and the T has a responsibility to seek it).

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    Authoritarian towards big-picture and long-term issues, not towards small things. Avoid micromanagement, but assert your superior wisdom towards the situation so it doesn't go to waste.

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    Yeah, well I'm skeptical of authoritarian parenting styles. From my experience it leads to broken families and the child deserting/(being deserted from) the parent(s) at the first chance they get.

    There's only so much pressure you can put on someone to be a particular way/thing before they realize the parent always thinks making them miserable is justified.

    But I could be thinking of worst-case beneficiary/benefactor relations in socionics, where the beneficiary is doesn't find the benefactor to be helping.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Divided View Post
    Yeah, well I'm skeptical of authoritarian parenting styles. From my experience it leads to broken families and the child deserting/(being deserted from) the parent(s) at the first chance they get.

    There's only so much pressure you can put on someone to be a particular way/thing before they realize the parent always thinks making them miserable is justified.

    But I could be thinking of worst-case beneficiary/benefactor relations in socionics, where the beneficiary is doesn't find the benefactor to be helping.
    Hmm... you may be on to something.

    Lab, I agree that authoritarian is big picture.

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    Quote Originally Posted by FDG View Post
    I don't have children, but when I will, I'll definitely try to be as anti-authoritarian as I can (obviously, this means that I will have to be authoritarian if they're really crossing the line...). I wouldn't mind if my children disliked the "typical social order". I dislike it myself, in many ways.

    Besides, I also strongly believe in "nature over nurture" when it comes to character development. I've seen horrible children / men coming out of absolutely normal/perfect families, and vice versa. Probably, something which might be equally (if not more) important would be checking out who they end up befriending, even though ultimately such a thing can't be controlled, either.

    My parents are ISxjs and I believe they are not particularly authoritarian. They probably didn't need to be, either, since I've never displayed particularly wild behavioral tendencies.

    My "pet theory" is that ExTx children have the worst response to authoritarian parenting, while IxFx children have the "best" response. I have an ESTp acquaintance, which I could otherwise define as psychologically "fine", which set his own house on fire when he was 10-11, in response to a strong quarrel with his father.
    I am IxFx and a product of authoritarian/controlling parenting (by ESE and possible LSI), along with physical/mental abuse. It aggravated any authority issues I already had.
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    My mother is ENFp and had an extremely passive approach to parenting to the point where I felt like I basically took care of myself (e.g., making my own meals, getting myself ready in the morning, catching the bus on my own since she would sleep in). There weren't really any rules except I was supposed to tell her where I was at all times. I think her approach was encouraged, in a way, by my teachers. Even in 2nd grade, if my teacher had to leave the room for a few minutes, she would announce to the class that I was in charge (how fucked up as I look back on it!). I think she regrets all of this, because she has said to me multiple times in my adult life, "I'm sorry I never let you be a kid."

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    Quote Originally Posted by April View Post
    My mother is ENFp and had an extremely passive approach to parenting to the point where I felt like I basically took care of myself (e.g., making my own meals, getting myself ready in the morning, catching the bus on my own since she would sleep in). There weren't really any rules except I was supposed to tell her where I was at all times. I think her approach was encouraged, in a way, by my teachers. Even in 2nd grade, if my teacher had to leave the room for a few minutes, she would announce to the class that I was in charge (how fucked up as I look back on it!). I think she regrets all of this, because she has said to me multiple times in my adult life, "I'm sorry I never let you be a kid."
    Gosh, what did she do with all her time?
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    Quote Originally Posted by squark View Post
    I was raised in an extremely authoritarian home, in an extremely authoritarian religious environment. What was drilled into my parents' heads, and thus greatly influenced how they raised me and my siblings was that they were responsible for every mistake their kids made, and that it was a reflection on them as parents, and as people if their kids were not perfect in every way. And if there were not very strict rules and very harsh punishments for breaking them (even "talking back" could result in a nice beating) then they were not "doing their duty" as parents.

    This idea of kids as part of their parents, that if they mess up, the parents have messed up sets up a structure where parenting with love and guidance is replaced by pushing, strict standards, or just a very critical atmosphere, where you're watched for any sign of a screw-up.

    Kids need help and guidance in making good choices, finding their own way through life, developing their talents and growing as people. They can't do this on their own because they don't have the maturity or experience to know how to go about it. So, rules and guidlines, and examples are needed. A totally lax environment is one where the parents don't care enough about their kids to help them on their way, and a totally strict one is where the parents care so much about keeping the kids from doing anything wrong, that they forget that their job is to raise these little people into happy, self-responsible adults, not jam them into a mold that they'll never be able to live up to.
    So, was your father the same type (socionics, Enneagram wise) as you?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jarno View Post
    1)
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    My reply: well I will answer that, if you first tell me how much you weigh!

    2)
    A girl I was dating said she was oh so great at sex etc, but she didn't do blowjobs.
    My reply: Oh I'm really romantic etc, I just will never take you out to dinner.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Golden View Post
    Well, a couple of points on this:

    Maybe the parent as helper is the quote-unquote best mode. It's the philosophy I've adopted with my child. Nonetheless, it's very, very difficult to do.

    What makes it the best? There's no such thing, perhaps, as a single best mode for all people and all times, but it may be the best way to parent in response to the current trend of human consciousness and western social pressures and needs.

    "They come from a place of obvious bias"--maybe. But what is the nature of the bias? I'm not sure I can articulate what the bias is.

    Even if the quoted material is more or less correct, it's idealistic, pointing to "what" rather than "how."

    The most common mainstream view of parenting styles I've seen recognizes three categories: authoritarian, authoritative, and permissive. The middle ground in this construct is the authoritative mode, in which the parent provides a strong psychological "container" for the child without breaking his/her spirit. That would be the how, I suppose.
    Hmmm... perhaps I agree with the bit about western society and consciousness, etc.

    As far as obvious bias, I was just talking about the negativity attached to "magical thinking" and the positive connotation of "liberal, and/or socially responsible-caring-conscientious," and the assumption that "empathy" is inherently a superior virtue to those that might be instilled by other parenting methods.

    I mean... yeah, you should help your own child be his or her own person, sure. But that's a "what" that is so vague and disconnected from "how" that it just about ceases to be a "what" at all. To some extent you do have to socialize your children, because there are some things you're just not going to learn without examples. I mean, you socialize your children by feeding them, thereby teaching them that their needs can and will be provided for. You socialize your children by talking to them, and by talking to others in their presence. In a larger sense, you socialize them by how you relate to other adults, especially the other parent (if available). So yeah... socialization happens whether your want it to or not. At least some of it has to be consciously giving your child a good example or positive guidance, I think. Shrug. I mean... kids don't come into the world knowing that it's impolite to laugh at someone's toupee, but it's probably something you should teach them, just in case.
    Not a rule, just a trend.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 07490 View Post
    So, was your father the same type (socionics, Enneagram wise) as you?
    No. Neither of my parents are 1s. but that whole religious environment was.

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