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Thread: Query: 3-dimensional dynamic functions

  1. #1
    Creepy-male

    Default Query: 3-dimensional dynamic functions

    Two questions.

    Will be using me as an example, because I can't quite juggle this well enough to generalise it.

    Okay, so. I'm an SEI. I have 3-dimensional Fe, and 4-dimensional Fi.

    This leads to two questions.

    1. How can a dynamic element lack the Time dimension?

    2. Considering my Demonstrative Fi has the Time dimension, does it work sort of like "Dynamic Fi"?

  2. #2
    ._. Aiss's Avatar
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    Time dimension isn't related to static/dynamic.

    I'm going to post part of what I've written in a pm a while ago, though I never got to refining it... whatever. Criticize away.

     

    I think dimensionality can actually be pretty visible - 1-dimensional is case-by-case learning, 2-dimensional is normative, 3-dimensional situational and 4-dimensional futuristic. Each one is less specific and more context-dependent than the previous one. So when we're faced with an unknown situation, we're able to use what we learned via a stronger functions, because it's flexible and adaptable, but what we learned by a weaker one is useless in comparison, as in this area we need experience and familiarity with the matter first (which always helps, but it's an essential difference early on).

    A really lame analogy (purposefully revolving around abilities unrelated to socionics):
    1-d - learning how to draw a line with a pencil.
    2-d - learning how to use a pencil.
    3-d - learning how to draw.
    4-d - learning how to represent an object.

    The point of that pattern is, 1-d is most specific and 4-d most generic. You may start with learning to draw a specific object with a specific tool, but depending on the "mode" of learning (dimensionality) you effectively learn this, to use a tool, to draw in general, or the most vague yet widely applicable "creating a representation". And when you're faced with a new situation - for example 3d modeling - only the latter would be of any use to get started in the area, though of course not nearly as good as an actual experience.

    So to 1-d, higher dimensions seem to generalize what's learned, to project it onto other things; to 4-d, lower dimensions seem too specific, not making full use of it.

    An element with dimensionality is simply how much we can learn from its type of information; so 4-d Ni would be able to "predict" development of unknown situation based on its generic observations of indirect consequences, while 1-d Ni would assume a known situation to develop as they know it to have once (not necessarily "lived through it"), and an unknown one to be unpredictable.

  3. #3
    Creepy-bg

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    Quote Originally Posted by Aiss View Post
    Time dimension isn't related to static/dynamic.

    I'm going to post part of what I've written in a pm a while ago, though I never got to refining it... whatever. Criticize away.

     

    I think dimensionality can actually be pretty visible - 1-dimensional is case-by-case learning, 2-dimensional is normative, 3-dimensional situational and 4-dimensional futuristic. Each one is less specific and more context-dependent than the previous one. So when we're faced with an unknown situation, we're able to use what we learned via a stronger functions, because it's flexible and adaptable, but what we learned by a weaker one is useless in comparison, as in this area we need experience and familiarity with the matter first (which always helps, but it's an essential difference early on).

    A really lame analogy (purposefully revolving around abilities unrelated to socionics):
    1-d - learning how to draw a line with a pencil.
    2-d - learning how to use a pencil.
    3-d - learning how to draw.
    4-d - learning how to represent an object.

    The point of that pattern is, 1-d is most specific and 4-d most generic. You may start with learning to draw a specific object with a specific tool, but depending on the "mode" of learning (dimensionality) you effectively learn this, to use a tool, to draw in general, or the most vague yet widely applicable "creating a representation". And when you're faced with a new situation - for example 3d modeling - only the latter would be of any use to get started in the area, though of course not nearly as good as an actual experience.

    So to 1-d, higher dimensions seem to generalize what's learned, to project it onto other things; to 4-d, lower dimensions seem too specific, not making full use of it.

    An element with dimensionality is simply how much we can learn from its type of information; so 4-d Ni would be able to "predict" development of unknown situation based on its generic observations of indirect consequences, while 1-d Ni would assume a known situation to develop as they know it to have once (not necessarily "lived through it"), and an unknown one to be unpredictable.
    needs more cowbell.

  4. #4
    Inception Mastermind KeroZen's Avatar
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    Aiss: interesting
    "Everyone carries a shadow, and the less it is embodied in the individual’s conscious life, the blacker and denser it is.
    At all counts, it forms an unconscious snag, thwarting our most well-meant intentions."

    C. G. Jung


    -----
    Know your body, know your mind, know your limits.

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