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Thread: Knowing that something is possible is the best

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    Poster Nutbag The Exception's Avatar
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    Default Knowing that something is possible is the best

    I keep a blog on one of the other forums I participate in and the following, and here's my latest entry. Just wondering what socionic type is most likely to have the following mindset. I'm guessing some sort of ego.


    So I feel a lot less down about the job situation thing. I think its a matter of time healing all wounds. Sure the little bit of extra money would have been nice but I'm no worse off financially then I was the day before I received the rejection.

    I don't really have a burning desire to teach anymore. I left that profession because it was burning me out. Still it bothered me to be rejected even though I didn't really want to do the job in the first place. Yeah its kind of stupid to think that way. I think part of the joy in getting a job offer is knowing that's its possible to have the job if you really wanted to. And knowing that someone thinks you'd be a really good fit and hires you is a definite boost to the self-esteem.

    I guess I see rejection like having possibilities taken away from me. I felt the same when I was rejected from Target and a bunch of major retail stores. It's hardly my dream job to work in retail, yet if I got an offer, then I know its possible to work there, and its another option I have.

    I find knowing that its possible to do something ultimately more satisfying than the actual doing. I remember a few years back, I was really into exercising and physical fitness. When I first joined the gym, I took a fitness test and scored low on most measures. After several months, I managed to score in the above average range, something I felt really good about because I'd never been the physically fit, athletic type. After seeing the score, I knew that being physically fit was *possible* for me to attain. But shortly after that, I started slacking off on exercising and saw my fitness dwindle. I guess I just wanted to know that physical fitness was *possible* for me to attain. I wasn't nearly as interested in doing the work to maintain it.

    I find it very unsettling when there are requirements beyond someone's control that are necessary to attain something. Did you know you that you have to be between five-foot-six and five-foot-ten in order to be a rockette? Now I've never wanted to be a rockette and doubt I will ever want to but I'm five-foot-four, so I this is one thing I know will be impossible to attain. What if the aspiring rockette was absolutely perfect in every other way but fell just short of the height requirement? Again, its like having a possibility taken away from me. I'm very sensitive to that.

    Here's another example, in order to apply to be a Navy Seal, you have to be a male and no older than 28 years of age. Well I fail on both regards. The male requirement is there because only males can serve in combat. Sure I understand why there's rigorous physical requirements to be a Navy Seal and if you're over 28, chances are you're already past your physical peak but what if you're a male over 28 whose one of those rare people who's still in tip-top shape? Shouldn't you be given a chance? Again, I've never wanted to be a Navy Seal anyway, but I cringe when reading requirements like this.
    LII-Ne with strong EII tendencies, 6w7-9w1-3w4 so/sp/sx, INxP



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    Trevor's Avatar
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    I find it very unsettling when there are requirements beyond someone's control that are necessary to attain something. Did you know you that you have to be between five-foot-six and five-foot-ten in order to be a rockette? Now I've never wanted to be a rockette and doubt I will ever want to but I'm five-foot-four, so I this is one thing I know will be impossible to attain. What if the aspiring rockette was absolutely perfect in every other way but fell just short of the height requirement? Again, its like having a possibility taken away from me. I'm very sensitive to that.

    Here's another example, in order to apply to be a Navy Seal, you have to be a male and no older than 28 years of age. Well I fail on both regards. The male requirement is there because only males can serve in combat. Sure I understand why there's rigorous physical requirements to be a Navy Seal and if you're over 28, chances are you're already past your physical peak but what if you're a male over 28 whose one of those rare people who's still in tip-top shape? Shouldn't you be given a chance? Again, I've never wanted to be a Navy Seal anyway, but I cringe when reading requirements like this.
    They can't be bothered. Yes, there probably are better ways how to assess someone's applicability but these current rules of thumb are very cheap and..well..generally speaking, correct.

    Just wondering what socionic type is most likely to have the following mindset. I'm guessing some sort of ego.
    I'm guessing the same.
    Last edited by Trevor; 11-02-2010 at 09:50 PM.

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    CILi's Avatar
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    Maybe I missed it reading through your OP, but...

    How do you react to "having possibilities taken away" from you? Is there something in you that wants to prove 'em wrong (a la "Yes I CAN be a Navy Seal, Rockette, Target employee!"), or do you inwardly just sorta "give up" and feel defeated?

    To cut to the chase, I wonder if Se might somehow be linked to all that restriction/rejection/requirement stuff you react to above. (Which I suppose just backwardsly supports your Ne-ego point.)

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