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Thread: CONFLICT

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    ~~rubicon~~ Rubicon's Avatar
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    Default CONFLICT

    An aversion to conflict seems to automatically be associated with Si/Ne types, but research like the following seems to suggest that it has more to do with your early experiences.

    The excerpt below is from science of the heart, science of coherence, heart rate variability, Institute HeartMath...

    Research has shown that the heart’s afferent neurological signals directly affect activity in the amygdala and associated nuclei, an important emotional processing center in the brain. The amygdala is the key brain center that coordinates behavioral, immunological and neuroendocrine responses to environmental threats. It also serves as the store-house of emotional memory within the brain. In assessing the environment, the amygdala compares incoming emotional signals with stored emotional memories. In this way, the amygdala makes instantaneous decisions about the threat level of incoming sensory information, and due to its extensive connections to the hypothalamus and other autonomic nervous system centers, is able to "hijack" the neural pathways activating the autonomic nervous system and emotional response before the higher brain centers receive the sensory information.

    One of the functions of the amygdala is to organize what patterns become "familiar" to the brain. If the rhythm patterns generated by the heart are disordered and incoherent, especially in early life, the amygdala learns to expect disharmony as the familiar baseline; and thus we feel "at home" with incoherence, which can affect learning, creativity and emotional balance. In other words we feel "comfortable" only with internal incoherence, which in this case is really discomfort. On the basis of what has become familiar to the amygdala, the frontal cortex mediates decisions as to what constitutes appropriate behavior in any given situation. Thus, subconscious emotional memories and associated physiological patterns underlie and affect our perceptions, emotional reactions, thought processes and behavior. One of the research studies summarized in this Overview explains how we believe these emotional memory traces can be repatterned using heart-focused interventions so that coherence becomes the "familiar" and comfortable state.
    Thoughts?
    "Language is the Rubicon that divides man from beast."

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    xerx's Avatar
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    Ha! I totally relate to expecting disorder and incoherence in everyday situations. It makes me more aware of a situation to anticipate its negative aspects in advance. I don't really shy away from conflict either and I know that deep down I really enjoy it. But I do feel bad about it, so with my conscience at least I try to avoid it.

    FWIW, I have known SEIs who were hurtful bullies and somewhat acerbic towards other people, always pointing out faults and such in a passive-aggressive way, and EIEs/LIEs who were the exact opposite. Aversion to conflict or having negative/positive perception of things isn't a trait I particularly like to employ.

    It's better IMO to abstract yourself from behavioral traits altogether and just focus on the internal psychological processes defined by the elements. Learning the vocabulary for each element is good too, if you can interpret it in its proper context.
    It was in the reign of George III that the aforesaid personages lived and quarrelled; good or bad, handsome or ugly, rich or poor, they are all equal now.

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    ~~rubicon~~ Rubicon's Avatar
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    Cool. (c: I feel the same way deep down. I wish people weren't so sensitive. lol

    "Internal psychological processes". Heh. Ok. :-/
    "Language is the Rubicon that divides man from beast."

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    Haikus
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    It's waaaay simpler than that. It's just your testosterone that likes a good conflict/brawl/struggle. None of that other complicated crap.

    You probably have high levels of testosterone for a girl.

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    ~~rubicon~~ Rubicon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BulletsAndDoves View Post
    It's waaaay simpler than that. It's just your testosterone that likes a good conflict/brawl/struggle. None of that other complicated crap.

    You probably have high levels of testosterone for a girl.
    lol I think I do.
    "Language is the Rubicon that divides man from beast."

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    I mostly don't see why this has anything to do with whether or not types are conflict averse. Assuming that socionics operates at some level by a myriad of neurological mechanisms, why would it not include this one?

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    Poster Nutbag The Exception's Avatar
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    Interesting info
    LII-Ne with strong EII tendencies, 6w7-9w1-3w4 so/sp/sx, INxP



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    Medulla oblongata.

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