View Poll Results: J.D. Salinger's type?

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  • ILE (ENTp)

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  • SEI (ISFp)

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  • ESE (ESFj)

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  • LII (INTj)

    0 0%
  • SLE (ESTp)

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    0 0%
  • LIE (ENTj)

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    0 0%
  • IEE (ENFp)

    2 100.00%
  • SLI (ISTp)

    0 0%
  • LSE (ESTj)

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Thread: Jerome David "J. D." Salinger

  1. #1

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    Default Jerome David "J. D." Salinger

    didn't think he'd make it to 91

    INFp type 9?






    The New Yorker article - http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2010/02/08/bearable

    quotes - http://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/J._D._Salinger

    "What really knocks me out is a book that, when you're all done reading it, you wish the author that wrote it was a terrific friend of yours and you could call him up on the phone whenever you felt like it. That doesn't happen much, though."

    "There is a marvelous peace in not publishing...Publishing is a terrible invasion of my privacy. I like to write. I love to write. But I write just for myself and my own pleasure."

    "Don't ever tell anybody anything. If you do, you start missing everybody."

    "Among other things, you'll find that you're not the first person who was ever confused and frightened and even sickened by human behavior. You're by no means alone on that score, you'll be excited and stimulated to know. Many, many men have been just as troubled morally and spiritually as you are right now. Happily, some of them kept records of their troubles. You'll learn from them—if you want to. Just as someday, if you have something to offer, someone will learn something from you. It's a beautiful reciprocal arrangement. And it isn't education. It's history. It's poetry."

    "Anyway, I keep picturing all these little kids playing some game in this big field of rye and all. Thousands of little kids, and nobody's around - nobody big, I mean - except me. And I'm standing on the edge of some crazy cliff. What I have to do, I have to catch everybody if they start to go over the cliff - I mean if they're running and they don't look where they're going I have to come out from somewhere and catch them. That's all I do all day. I'd just be the catcher in the rye and all. I know it's crazy, but that's the only thing I'd really like to be."

    "The mark of the immature man is that he wants to die nobly for a cause, while the mark of the mature man is that he wants to live humbly for one."

    "And I have one of those very loud, stupid laughs. I mean if I ever sat behind myself in a movie or something, I'd probably lean over and tell myself to please shut up."

    "I’m just sick of ego, ego, ego. My own and everybody else’s. I’m sick of everybody that wants to get somewhere, do something distinguished and all, be somebody interesting. It’s disgusting."

    There’s no more to Holden Caulfield. Read the book again. It’s all there. Holden Caulfield is only a frozen moment in time.

    The fact is always obvious much too late, but the most singular difference between happiness and joy is that happiness is a solid and joy a liquid.

    I don't really deeply feel that anyone needs an airtight reason for quoting from the works of writers he loves, but it's always nice, I'll grant you, if he has one.

    "I have scars on my hands from touching certain people."



    Last edited by silke; 03-06-2017 at 04:55 PM. Reason: updated links

  2. #2
    wants to be a writer. silverchris9's Avatar
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    Default

    Or perhaps IEI 5w6 5-9-4 instinctual stacking. IEI seems very likely, though, based on this type. On the other hand, that level of recluse, it's difficult to type him based on that intense self-seclusion.
    Not a rule, just a trend.

    IEI. Probably Fe subtype. Pretty sure I'm E4, sexual instinctual type, fairly confident that I'm a 3 wing now, so: IEI-Fe E4w3 sx/so. Considering 3w4 now, but pretty sure that 4 fits the best.

    Yes 'a ma'am that's pretty music...

    I am grateful for the mystery of the soul, because without it, there could be no contemplation, except of the mysteries of divinity, which are far more dangerous to get wrong.

  3. #3
    WE'RE ALL GOING HOME HERO's Avatar
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    Default Jerome David Salinger










    J. D. Salinger: Beta Irrational—Fe-INFp (Normalizing subtype) [INFp-ISFj], or [Harmonizing (or Normalizing)] SLE; or ESI-Se

    - from The Catcher in the Rye by J. D. Salinger; pp. 7-8: The week before that, somebody’d stolen my camel’s-hair coat right out of my room, with my fur-lined gloves right in the pocket and all. Pencey was full of crooks. Quite a few guys came from these very wealthy families, but it was full of crooks anyway. The more expensive a school is, the more crooks it has—I’m not kidding. Anyway, I kept standing next to that crazy cannon, looking down at the game and freezing my ass off. Only, I wasn’t watching the game too much. What I was really hanging around for, I was trying to feel some kind of a good-by. I mean I’ve left schools and places I didn’t even know I was leaving them. I hate that. I don’t care if it’s a sad good-by or a bad good-by, but when I leave a place I like to know I’m leaving it. If you don’t, you feel even worse.
    I was lucky. All of a sudden I thought of something that helped make me know I was getting the hell out. I suddenly remembered this time, in around October, that I and Robert Tichener and Paul Campbell were chucking a football around, in front of the academic building. They were nice guys, especially Tichener. It was just before dinner and it was getting pretty dark out, but we kept chucking the ball around anyway. It kept getting darker and darker, and we could hardly see the ball any more, but we didn’t want to stop doing what we were doing. Finally we had to. This teacher that taught biology, Mr. Zambesi, stuck his head out of this window in the academic building and told us to go back to the dorm and get ready for dinner. If I get a chance to remember that kind of stuff, I can get a good-by when I need one—at least, most of the time I can. As soon as I got it, I turned around and started running down the other side of the hill, toward old Spencer’s house. He didn’t live on the campus. He lived on Anthony Wayne Avenue.
    I ran all the way to the main gate, and then I waited a second till I got my breath. I have no wind, if you want to know the truth. I’m quite a heavy smoker, for one thing—that is, I used to be. They made me cut it out. Another thing, I grew six and a half inches last year. That’s also how I practically got t.b. and came out here for all these goddam checkups and stuff. I’m pretty healthy, though.
    Anyway, as soon as I got my breath back I ran across Route 204. It was icy as hell and I damn near fell down. I don’t even know what I was running for—I guess I just felt like it. After I got across the road, I felt like I was sort of disappearing. It was that kind of a crazy afternoon, terrifically cold, and no sun out or anything, and you felt like you were disappearing every time you crossed a road.

    - pp. 11-13: “Hello, sir,” I said. “I got your note. Thanks a lot.” He’d written me this note asking me to stop by and say good-by before vacation started, on account of I wasn’t coming back. “You didn’t have to do all that. I’d have come over to say good-by anyway.”
    “Have a seat there, boy,” old Spencer said. He meant the bed.
    I sat down on it. “How’s your grippe, sir?”
    “M’boy, if I felt any better I’d have to send for the doctor,” old Spencer said. That knocked him out. He started chuckling like a madman. Then he finally straightened himself out and said, “Why aren’t you down at the game? I thought this was the day of the big game.”
    “It is. I was. Only, I just got back from New York with the fencing team,” I said. Boy, his bed was like a rock.
    He started getting serious as hell. I knew he would. “So you’re leaving us, eh?” he said.
    “Yes, sir. I guess I am.”
    He started going into this nodding routine. You never saw anybody nod as much in your life as old Spencer did. You never knew if he was nodding a lot because he was thinking and all, or just because he was a nice old guy that didn’t know his ass from his elbow.
    “What did Dr. Thurmer say to you, boy? I understand you had quite a little chat.”
    “Yes, we did. We really did. I was in his office for around two hours, I guess.”
    “What’d he say to you?”
    “Oh . . . well, about Life being a game and all. And how you should play it according to the rules. He was pretty nice about it. I mean he didn’t hit the ceiling or anything. He just kept talking about Life being a game and all. You know.”
    “Life is a game, boy. Life is a game that one plays according to the rules.”
    “Yes, sir. I know it is. I know it.”
    Game, my ass. Some game. If you get on the side where all the hot-shots are, then it’s a game, all right—I’ll admit that. But if you get on the other side, where there aren’t any hot-shots, then what’s a game about it? Nothing. No game. “Has Dr. Thurmer written to your parents yet?” old Spencer asked me.
    “He said he was going to write them Monday.”
    “Have you yourself communicated with them?”
    “No, sir, I haven’t communicated with them, because I’ll probably see them Wednesday night when I get home.”
    “And how do you think they’ll take the news?”
    “Well . . . they’ll be pretty irritated about it,” I said. “They really will. This is about the fourth school I’ve gone to.” I shook my head. I shake my head quite a lot. “Boy!” I said. I also say “Boy!” quite a lot. Partly because I have a lousy vocabulary and partly because I act quite young for my age sometimes. I was sixteen then, and I’m seventeen now, and some times I act like I’m about thirteen. It’s really ironical, because I’m six foot two and a half and I have gray hair. I really do. The one side of my head—the right side—is full of millions of gray hairs. I’ve had them ever since I was a kid. And yet I still act sometimes like I was only about twelve. Everybody says that, especially my father. It’s partly true, too, but it isn’t all true. People always think something’s all true. I don’t give a damn, except that I get bored sometimes when people tell me to act my age. Sometimes I act a lot older than I am—I really do—but people never notice it. People never notice anything.

    - pp. 15-20: “ . . . I doubt very much if you opened your textbook even once the whole term. Did you? Tell the truth, boy.”
    “Well, I sort of glanced through it a couple of times,” I told him. I didn’t want to hurt his feelings. He was mad about history.
    “You glanced through it, eh?” he said—very sarcastic. “Your, ah, exam paper is over there on top of my chiffonier. On top of the pile. Bring it here, please.”
    It was a very dirty trick, but I went over and brought it over to him—I didn’t have any alternative or anything. Then I sat down on his cement bed again. Boy, you can’t imagine how sorry I was getting that I’d stopped by to say good-by to him.
    He started handling my exam paper like it was a turd or something. “We studied the Egyptians from November 4th to December 2nd,” he said. “You chose to write about them for the optional essay question. Would you care to hear what you had to say?”
    “No, sir, not very much,” I said.
    He read it anyway, though. You can’t stop a teacher when they want to do something. They just do it.

    The Egyptians were an ancient race of Caucasians residing in one of the northern sections of Africa. The latter as we all know is the largest continent in the Eastern Hemisphere.

    I had to sit there and listen to that crap. It certainly was a dirty trick.

    The Egyptians are extremely interesting to us today for various reasons. Modern science would still like to know what the secret ingredients were that the Egyptians used when they wrapped up dead people so that their faces would not rot for innumerable centuries. This interesting riddle is still quite a challenge to modern science in the twentieth century.

    He stopped reading and put my paper down. I was beginning to sort of hate him. “Your essay, shall we say, ends there,” he said in this very sarcastic voice. You wouldn’t think such an old guy would be so sarcastic and all. “However, you dropped me a little note, at the bottom of the page,” he said.
    “I know I did,” I said. I said it very fast because I wanted to stop him before he started reading that out loud. But you couldn’t stop him. He was hot as a firecracker.

    DEAR MR. SPENCER [he read out loud]. That is all I know about the Egyptians. I can’t seem to get very interested in them although your lectures are very interesting. It is all right with me if you flunk me though as I am flunking everything else except English anyway. Respectfully yours, HOLDEN CAULFIELD.

    He put my goddam paper down then and looked at me like he’d just beaten hell out of me in ping-pong or something. I don’t think I’ll ever forgive him for reading me that crap out loud. I wouldn’t’ve read it out loud to him if he’d written it—I really wouldn’t. In the first place, I’d only written that damn note so that he wouldn’t feel too bad about flunking me.
    “Do you blame me for flunking you, boy?” he said.
    “No, sir! I certainly don’t,” I said. I wished to hell he’d stop calling me “boy” all the time.
    He tried chucking my exam paper on the bed when he was through with it. Only, he missed again, naturally. I had to get up again and pick it up and put it on top of the Atlantic Monthly. It’s boring to do that every two minutes.
    “What would you have done in my place?” he said. “Tell the truth, boy.”
    Well, you could see he really felt pretty lousy about flunking me. So I shot the bull for a while. I told him I was a real moron, and all that stuff. I told him how I would’ve done exactly the same thing if I’d been in his place, and how most people didn’t appreciate how tough it is being a teacher. That kind of stuff. The old bull.
    The funny thing is, though, I was sort of thinking of something else while I shot the bull. I live in New York, and I was thinking about the lagoon in Central Park, down near Central Park South. I was wondering if it would be frozen over when I got home, and if it was, where did the ducks go. I was wondering where the ducks went when the lagoon got all icy and frozen over. I wondered if some guy came in a truck and took them away to a zoo or something. Or if they just flew away.
    I’m lucky, though. I mean I could shoot the old bull to old Spencer and think about those ducks at the same time. It’s funny. You don’t have to think too hard when you talk to a teacher. All of a sudden, though, he interrupted me while I was shooting the bull. He was always interrupting you.
    “How do you feel about all this, boy? I’d be very interested to know. Very interested.”
    “You mean about my flunking out of Pencey and all?” I said. I sort of wished he’d cover up his bumpy chest. It wasn’t such a beautiful view.
    “If I’m not mistaken, I believe you also had some difficulty at the Whooton School and at Elkton Hills.” He didn’t say it just sarcastic, but sort of nasty, too.
    “I didn’t have too much difficulty at Elkton Hills,” I told him. “I didn’t exactly flunk out or anything. I just quit, sort of.”
    “Why, may I ask?”
    “Why? Oh, well it’s a long story, sir. I mean it’s pretty complicated.” I didn’t feel like going into the whole thing with him. He wouldn’t have understood it anyway. It wasn’t up his alley at all. One of the biggest reasons I left Elkton Hills was because I was surrounded by phonies. That’s all. They were coming in the goddam window. For instance, they had this headmaster, Mr. Haas, that was the phoniest bastard I ever met in my life. Ten times worse than old Thurmer. On Sundays, for instance, old Haas went around shaking hands with everybody’s parents when they drove up to school. He’d be charming as hell and all. Except if some boy had little old funny-looking parents. You should’ve seen the way he did with my roommate’s parents. I mean if a boy’s mother was sort of fat or corny-looking or something, and if somebody’s father was one of those guys that wear those suits with very big shoulders and corny black-and-white shoes, then old Haas would just shake hands with them and give them a phony smile and then he’d go talk, for maybe a half an hour, with somebody else’s parents. I can’t stand that stuff. It drives me crazy. It makes me so depressed I go crazy. I hated that goddam Elkton Hills.
    Old Spencer asked me something then, but I didn’t hear him. I was thinking about old Haas. “What, sir?” I said.
    “Do you have any particular qualms about leaving Pencey?”
    “Oh, I have a few qualms, all right. Sure . . . but not too many. Not yet, anyway. I guess it hasn’t really hit me yet. It takes things a while to hit me. All I’m doing right now is thinking about going home Wednesday. I’m a moron.”
    “Do you feel absolutely no concern for your future, boy?”
    “Oh, I feel some concern for my future, all right. Sure. Sure, I do.” I thought about it for a minute. “But not too much, I guess. Not too much, I guess.”
    “You will,” old Spencer said. “You will, boy. You will when it’s too late.”
    I didn’t like hearing him say that. It made me sound dead or something. It was very depressing. “I guess I will,” I said.

    - pp. 22-24: Where I lived at Pencey, I lived in the Ossenburger Memorial Wing of the new dorms. It was only for juniors and seniors. I was a junior. My roommate was a senior. It was named after this guy Ossenburger that went to Pencey. He made a pot of dough in the undertaking business after he got out of Pencey. What he did, he started these undertaking parlors all over the country that you could get members of your family buried for about five bucks apiece. You should see old Ossenburger. He probably just shoves them in a sack and dumps them in the river. Anyway, he gave Pencey a pile of dough, and they named our wing after him. The first football game of the year, he came up to school in this big goddam Cadillac, and we all had to stand up in the grandstand and give him a locomotive—that’s a cheer. Then, the next morning, in chapel, he made a speech that lasted about ten hours. He started off with about fifty corny jokes, just to show us what a regular guy he was. Very big deal. Then he started telling us how he was never ashamed, when he was in some kind of trouble or something, to get right down on his knees and pray to God. He told us we should always pray to God—talk to Him and all—wherever we were. He told us we ought to think of Jesus as our buddy and all. He said he talked to Jesus all the time. Even when he was driving his car. That killed me. I can just see the big phony bastard shifting into first gear and asking Jesus to send him a few more stiffs. The only good part of his speech was right in the middle of it. He was telling us all about what a swell guy he was, what a hot-shot and all, then all of a sudden this guy sitting in the row in front of me, Edgar Marsalla, laid this terrific fart. It was a very crude thing to do, in chapel and all, but it was also quite amusing. Old Marsalla. He damn near blew the roof off. Hardly anybody laughed out loud, and old Ossenburger made out like he didn’t even hear it, but old Thurmer, the headmaster, was sitting right next to him on the rostrum and all, and you could tell he heard it. Boy, was he sore. He didn’t say anything then, but the next night he made us have compulsory study hall in the academic building and he came up and made a speech. He said that the boy that had created the disturbance in chapel wasn’t fit to go to Pencey. We tried to get old Marsalla to rip off another one, right while old Thurmer was making his speech, but he wasn’t in the right mood.

    - pp. 24-25: The book I was reading was this book I took out of the library by mistake. They gave me the wrong book, and I didn’t notice it till I got back to my room. They gave me Out of Africa, by Isak Dinesen. I thought it was going to stink, but it didn’t. It was a very good book. I’m quite illiterate, but I read a lot. My favorite author is my brother D.B., and my next favorite is Ring Lardner. My brother gave me a book by Ring Lardner for my birthday, just before I went to Pencey. It had these very funny, crazy plays in it, and then it had this one story about a traffic cop that falls in love with this very cute girl that’s always speeding. Only, he’s married, the cop, so he can’t marry her or anything. Then this girl gets killed because she’s always speeding. That story just about killed me. What I like best is a book that’s at least funny once in a while. I read a lot of classical books, like The Return of the Native and all, and I like them, and I read a lot of war books and mysteries and all, but they don’t knock me out too much. What really knocks me out is a book that, when you’re all done reading it, you wish the author that wrote it was a terrific friend of yours and you could call him up on the phone whenever you felt like it. That doesn’t happen much, though. I wouldn’t mind calling this Isak Dinesen up. And Ring Lardner, except that D.B. told me he’s dead. You take that book Of Human Bondage, by Somerset Maugham, though. I read it last summer. It’s a pretty good book and all, but I wouldn’t want to call Somerset Maugham up. I don’t know. He just isn’t the kind of a guy I’d want to call up, that’s all. I’d rather call old Thomas Hardy up. I like that Eustacia Vye.
    Anyway, I put on my new hat and sat down and started reading that book Out of Africa. I’d read it already, but I wanted to read certain parts over again.

    - p. 34: He was at least a pretty friendly guy, Stradlater. It was partly a phony kind of friendly, but at least he always said hello to Ackley and all.
    Ackley just sort of grunted when he said “How’sa boy?” He wouldn’t answer him, but he didn’t have guts enough not to at least grunt. Then he said to me, “I think I’ll get going. See ya later.”
    “Okay,” I said. He never exactly broke your heart when he went back to his own room.
    Old Stradlater started taking off his coat and tie and all. “I think maybe I’ll take a fast shave,” he said. He had a pretty heavy beard. He really did.
    “Where’s your date?” I asked him.
    “She’s waiting in the Annex.” He went out of the room with his toilet kit and towel under his arm. No shirt on or anything. He always walked around in his bare torso because he thought he had a damn good build. He did, too. I have to admit it.

    - pp. 35-39: You remember I said before that Ackley was a slob in his personal habits? Well, so was Stradlater, but in a different way. Stradlater was more of a secret slob. He always looked all right, Stradlater, but for instance, you should’ve seen the razor he shaved himself with. It was always rusty as hell and full of lather and hairs and crap. He never cleaned it or anything. He always looked good when he was finished fixing himself up, but he was a secret slob anyway, if you knew him the way I did. The reason he fixed himself up to look good was because he was madly in love with himself. He thought he was the handsomest guy in the Western Hemisphere. He was pretty handsome, too—I’ll admit it. But he was mostly the kind of a handsome guy that if your parents saw his picture in your Year Book, they’d right away say, “Who’s this boy?” I mean he was mostly a Year Book kind of handsome guy. I knew a lot of guys at Pencey I thought were a lot handsomer than Stradlater, but they wouldn’t look handsome if you saw their pictures in the Year Book. They’d look like they had big noses or their ears stuck out. I’ve had that experience frequently.
    Anyway, I was sitting on the washbowl next to where Stradlater was shaving, sort of turning the water on and off. I still had my red hunting hat on, with the peak around to the back and all. I really got a bang out of that hat.
    “Hey,” Stradlater said. “Wanna do me a big favor?”
    “What?” I said. Not too enthusiastic. He was always asking you to do him a big favor. You take a very handsome guy, or a guy that thinks he’s a real hot-shot, and they’re always asking you to do them a big favor. Just because they’re crazy about themself, they think you’re crazy about them, too, and that you’re just dying to do them a favor. It’s sort of funny, in a way.
    “You goin’ out tonight?” he said.
    “I might. I might not. I don’t know. Why?”
    “I got about a hundred pages to read for history for Monday,” he said. “How ‘bout writing a composition for me, for English? I’ll be up the creek if I don’t get the goddam thing in by Monday, the reason I ask. How ‘bout it?”
    It was very ironical. It really was.
    I’m the one that’s flunking out of the goddam place, and you’re asking me to write you a goddam composition,” I said.
    “Yeah, I know. The thing is, though, I’ll be up the creek if I don’t get it in. Be a buddy. Be a buddyroo. Okay?”
    I didn’t answer him right away. Suspense is good for some bastards like Stradlater.
    “What on?” I said.
    Anything. Anything descriptive. A room. Or a house. Or something you once lived in or something—you know. Just as long as it’s descriptive as hell.” He gave out a big yawn while he said that. Which is something that gives me a royal pain in the ass. I mean if somebody yawns right while they’re asking you to do them a goddam favor. “Just don’t do it too good, is all,” he said. “That sonuvabitch Hartzell thinks you’re a hot-shot in English, and he knows you’re my roommate. So I mean don’t stick all the commas and stuff in the right place.”
    That’s something else that gives me a royal pain. I mean if you’re good at writing compositions and somebody starts talking about commas. Stradlater was always doing that. He wanted you to think that the only reason he was lousy at writing compositions was because he stuck all the commas in the wrong place. He was a little bit like Ackley, that way. I once sat next to Ackley at this basketball game. We had a terrific guy on the team, Howie Coyle, that could sink them from the middle of the floor, without even touching the backboard or anything. Ackley kept saying, the whole goddam game, that Coyle had a perfect build for basketball. God, how I hate that stuff.
    I got bored sitting on that washbowl after a while, so I backed up a few feet and started doing this tap dance, just for the hell of it. I was just amusing myself. I can’t really tap-dance or anything, but it was a stone floor in the can, and it was good for tap-dancing. I started imitating one of those guys in the movies. In one of those musicals. I hate the movies like poison, but I get a bang imitating them. Old Stradlater watched me in the mirror while he was shaving. All I need’s an audience. I’m an exhibitionist. “I’m the goddam Governor’s son,” I said. I was knocking myself out. Tap-dancing all over the place. “He doesn’t want me to be a tap dancer. He wants me to go to Oxford. But it’s in my goddam blood, tap-dancing.” Old Stradlater laughed. He didn’t have too bad a sense of humor. “It’s the opening night of the Ziegfeld Follies.” I was getting out of breath. I have hardly any wind at all. “The leading man can’t go on. He’s drunk as a bastard. So who do they get to take his place? Me, that’s who. The little ole goddam Governor’s son.”
    “Where’dja get that hat?” Stradlater said. He meant my hunting hat. He’d never seen it before.
    I was out of breath anyway, so I quit horsing around. I took off my hat and looked at it for about the ninetieth time. “I got it in New York this morning. For a buck. Ya like it?”
    Stradlater nodded. “Sharp,” he said. He was only flattering me, though, because right away he said, “Listen. Are ya gonna write that composition for me? I have to know.”
    “If I get the time, I will. If I don’t, I won’t,” I said. I went over and sat down on the washbowl next to him again. “Who’s your date?” I asked him. “Fitzgerald?”
    “Hell, no! I told ya, I’m through with that pig.”
    “Yeah? Give her to me, boy. No kidding. She’s my type.”
    “Take her . . . She’s too old for you.”
    All of a sudden—for no good reason, really, except that I was sort of in the mood for horsing around—I felt like jumping off the washbowl and getting old Stradlater in a half nelson. That’s a wrestling hold, in case you don’t know, where you get the other guy around the neck and choke him to death, if you feel like it. So I did it. I landed on him like a goddam panther.
    “Cut it out, Holden, for Chrissake!” Stradlater said. He didn’t feel like horsing around. He was shaving and all. “Wuddaya wanna make me do—cut my goddam head off?”
    I didn’t let go, though. I had a pretty good half nelson on him. “Liberate yourself from my viselike grip,” I said.
    “Je-sus Christ.” He put down his razor, and all of a sudden jerked his arms up and sort of broke my hold on him. He was a very strong guy.

    - p. 42: “Her mother and father were divorced. Her mother was married again to some booze hound,” I said. “Skinny guy with hairy legs. I remember him. He wore shorts all the time. Jane said he was supposed to be a playwright or some goddam thing, but all I ever saw him do was booze all the time and listen to every single goddam mystery program on the radio. And run around the goddam house, naked. With Jane around, and all.”
    “Yeah?” Stradlater said. That really interested him. About the booze hound running around the house naked, with Jane around. Stradlater was a very sexy bastard.
    “She had a lousy childhood. I’m not kidding.”
    That didn’t interest Stradlater, though. Only very sexy stuff interested him.

    - pp. 49-51: . . . I couldn’t think of a room or a house or anything to describe the way Stradlater said he had to have. I’m not too crazy about describing rooms and houses anyway. So what I did, I wrote about my brother Allie’s baseball mitt. It was a very descriptive subject. It really was. My brother Allie had this left-handed fielder’s mitt. He was left-handed. The thing that was descriptive about it, though, was that he had poems written all over the fingers and the pocket and everywhere. In green ink. He wrote them on it so that he’d have something to read when he was in the field and nobody was up at bat. He’s dead now. He got leukemia and died when we were up in Maine, on July 18, 1946. You’d have liked him. He was two years younger than I was, but he was about fifty times as intelligent. He was terrifically intelligent. His teachers were always writing letters to my mother, telling her what a pleasure it was having a boy like Allie in their class. And they weren’t just shooting the crap. They really meant it. But it wasn’t just that he was the most intelligent member in the family. He was also the nicest, in lots of ways. He never got mad at anybody. People with red hair are supposed to get mad very easily, but Allie never did, and he had very red hair. I’ll tell you what kind of red hair he had. I started playing golf when I was only ten years old. I remember once, the summer I was around twelve, teeing off and all, and having a hunch that if I turned around all of a sudden, I’d see Allie. So I did, and sure enough, he was sitting on his bike outside the fence—there was this fence that went all around the course—and he was sitting there, about a hundred and fifty yards behind me, watching me tee off. That’s the kind of red hair he had. God, he was a nice kid, though. He used to laugh so hard at something he thought of at the dinner table that he just about fell off his chair. I was only thirteen, and they were going to have me psychoanalyzed and all, because I broke all the windows in the garage. I don’t blame them. I really don’t. I slept in the garage the night he died, and I broke all the goddam windows with my fist, just for the hell of it. I even tried to break all the windows on the station wagon we had that summer, but my hand was already broken and everything by that time, and I couldn’t do it. It was a very stupid thing to do, I’ll admit, but I hardly didn’t even know I was doing it, and you didn’t know Allie. My hand still hurts me once in a while, when it rains and all, and I can’t make a real fist any more—not a tight one, I mean—but outside of that I don’t care much. I mean I’m not going to be a goddam surgeon or a violinist or anything anyway.
    Anyway, that’s what I wrote Stadlater’s composition about. Old Allie’s baseball mitt. I happened to have it with me, in my suitcase, so I got it out and copied down the poems that were written on it. All I had to do was change Allie’s name so that nobody would know it was my brother and not Stradlater’s. I wasn’t too crazy about doing it, but I couldn’t think of anything else descriptive. Besides, I sort of liked writing about it.
    Last edited by HERO; 01-01-2012 at 02:01 PM.

  4. #4
    not a bumblebee octo's Avatar
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    I love his Glass family stories.
    Quote Originally Posted by Agee The Great View Post
    Nobody here...besides me, seems to know what SLE is except for maybe Maritsa.

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    His pic comes off very ENFp and his writing has seemed Delta to me, just reminds me of other Delta novelists like Tolkien and the elements of writing that are often focused on predominantly; it's more of like I picture a fluid painting abstracted to principle and back than a sharp sensation abstracted to concept and back, so much more Si/Ne. Looks like the list agrees with me once again.
    Last edited by 717495; 01-01-2012 at 03:16 PM.

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    not a bumblebee octo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by polikujm View Post
    Looks like the list agrees with me once again.
    Quote Originally Posted by Agee The Great View Post
    Nobody here...besides me, seems to know what SLE is except for maybe Maritsa.

  7. #7
    Snomunegot munenori2's Avatar
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    He's cool. I remember when I read catcher I wanted to have a nomme de plume and be a writer that lived in the mountains.
    Moonlight will fall
    Winter will end
    Harvest will come
    Your heart will mend

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    Local Hero Saberstorm's Avatar
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    The world needed him to die.

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    silke's Avatar
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    IEE so/sp 3w4

    some of his quotes sound derived by Fi of the Delta variety


    "What really knocks me out is a book that, when you're all done reading it, you wish the author that wrote it was a terrific friend of yours and you could call him up on the phone whenever you felt like it. That doesn't happen much, though."

    "Among other things, you'll find that you're not the first person who was ever confused and frightened and even sickened by human behavior. You're by no means alone on that score, you'll be excited and stimulated to know. Many, many men have been just as troubled morally and spiritually as you are right now. Happily, some of them kept records of their troubles. You'll learn from them—if you want to. Just as someday, if you have something to offer, someone will learn something from you. It's a beautiful reciprocal arrangement. And it isn't education. It's history. It's poetry."

  10. #10
    darya's Avatar
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    Catcher in the rye reads like IEE bible.

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    I agree with IEE for Salinger only.

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    strrrng's Avatar
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    Fi-IEE works... kinda want to reread The Catcher in the Rye now
    4w3-5w6-8w7

  13. #13
    silke's Avatar
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    an interesting docu on him: http://www.divxstage.to/video/dvwp018h1rezp

    "He loved Lost Horizon. It's a movie about this place where you never grow old. ... And he said that the only person who ever could have played Holden Caulfield was himself. ... He cut himself off from a great deal of the world, but maintained a huge interest in observing it." - Joyce Maynard (SEI-Fe so/sp) about her relationship with J. D. Salinger.




    Interviewer: Do you think that he ultimately went into writing so that he could create characters, or create his own universe, where people met his expectations?
    Margaret Salinger (his daughter): I personally think that this is .... certainly what's going on.


    "Five new Salinger books are expected to go into publication between 2015 and 2020:
    - The Last and Best of the Peter Pans, a 1962 short story featuring the Catcher in the Rye protagonist Caulfield.
    - A World War II Love Story, which is based on Salinger's brief marriage to Sylvia, a Nazi collaborator.
    - A Counterintelligence Agent's Diary, based on the writer's experience interrogating prisoners during the final months of the second world war.
    - The Complete Chronicle of the Glass Family featuring five new short stories about his recurring character, Seymour Glass.
    - and A Religious Manual detailing his adherence to Ramakrishna’s Advaita Vedanta Hinduism, the religion he turned to later in life."


    His favorite editor William Shawn looks to be LIE-Ni: "J. D. Salinger in particular, adored him, and dedicated Franny and Zooey to Shawn."


  14. #14
    yifflord's Avatar
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    God, I hated Catcher in the Rye. Agree with IEE. He's very, very, very Delta.

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    Not IEE.
    ILI type seclusion is possible.

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