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Thread: Repost of "Discussing ENFp clusters" by Smilingeyes

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    Default Repost of "Discussing ENFp clusters" by Smilingeyes

    Quote Originally Posted by Smilingeyes
    Refer to here for the original explanation http://www.the16types.info/vbulletin...ad.php?t=23897 ....... ENFps are more difficult for me than INFjs. I've just spent much less time pondering them in my life. To me, the most emblematic, most undeniable ENFp who consistently shows both the Fi and the Ne would probably be:

    Brigitte Bardot


    "She is the princess of pout, the countess of come hither. Brigitte Bardot exuded a carefree, naïve sexuality that brought a whole new audience to French films." Time magazine.[33] French actress, former fashion model, singer and animal welfare/rights activist. In her early life Bardot was an aspiring ballet dancer. She started her acting career in 1952 and after appearing in 16 films became world-famous due to her role in controversial film And God Created Woman. During her career in show business Bardot starred in 48 films, performed in numerous musical shows, recorded 80 songs. After her retirement from the entertainment industry in the 1973, Bardot established herself as an animal rights activist. During the 1990s she became outspoken in her criticism of immigration, interracial relationships, Islam in France and homosexuality[4], and has been convicted five times for "inciting racial hatred".[5][6] In 1947, Bardot was accepted to The National Superior Conservatory of Paris for Music and Dance. By the invitation of her mother's acquaintance, she modeled in a fashion show in 1949. Was noticed by a young film director Roger Vadim... Although Bardot got the role, the shooting of the film was canceled, but it made her consider becoming an actress. Brigitte Bardot debuted in a 1952 comedy film Le Trou Normand (English title: Crazy for Love). In the same year she married Roger Vadim. From 1952 to 1956 she appeared in seventeen films. Her films of the early and mid 1950s were generally lightweight romantic dramas, some of them historical, in which she was cast as ingénue or siren, and often with an element of undress. She played bit parts in three English-language films, the British comedy Doctor at Sea (1955), Helen of Troy (1954), in which she was understudy for the title role but only appears as Helen's handmaid, and Act of Love (1954) with Kirk Douglas. Her French-language films were dubbed for international release. In hindsight, light comedies suited Brigitte Bardot's acting skills best. A fine example is her 'Une Parisienne' from 1957, one of the few of her films of which she has said she feels proud. In Hollywood, Bardot was considered too risqué to handle €” erotica like Bardot's Cette sacrée gamine (That Crazy Kid, 1955) was not typical of the American cinema of the time, and it was considered acceptable at the box office so long as it was clearly labeled "European." She divorced Vadim in 1957 and in 1959 married actor Jacques Charrier, with whom she starred in Babette Goes to War in 1959. The paparazzi preyed upon her marriage, while she and her husband clashed over the direction of her career. Her films became more substantial, but this brought a heavy pressure of dual celebrity as she sought critical acclaim while remaining a glamour model for most of the world. Vie privée (1960), directed by Louis Malle has more than an element of autobiography in it. The scene in which, returning to her apartment, Bardot's character is harangued in the elevator by a middle-aged cleaning lady calling her offensive names, was based on an actual incident, and is a resonant image of celebrity in the mid-20th century. Soon afterwards Bardot withdrew to the seclusion of Southern France. She participated in various musical shows and recorded many popular songs in the 1960s and 1970s. Bardot had an affair with her And God Created Woman co-star Jean-Louis Trintignant (married at the time to French actress Stephane Audran) followed by her divorce from Vadim. [8][9] The two lived together for about two years. Their relationship was complicated by Trintignant's frequent absence due to military service and Bardot's affair with musician Gilbert Bécaud, and they eventually separated.[8] The 9 February 1958 edition of the Los Angeles Times reported on the front page that Bardot was recovering in Italy from a reported nervous breakdown. A suicide attempt with sleeping pills two days earlier was denied by her public relations manager. [10]. On 18 June 1959 she married actor Jacques Charrier, by whom she had her only child, a son, Nicolas-Jacques Charrier (born 11 January 1960). To Bardot this was an undesirable pregnancy which she once compared to having a tumor growing within her. After she and Charrier divorced in 1962, Nicolas was raised in the Charrier family and did not maintain close contact with Bardot until his adulthood.[8] Bardot's other husbands were German millionaire playboy Gunter Sachs (14 July 1966 - 1 October 1969), and Bernard d'Ormale (16 August 1992 - present). She is reputed to have had relationships with many other men including her La Vérité co-star Sami Frey, musicians Serge Gainsbourg and Sacha Distel[8][9]. In the late 1950s she shared an exchange she considered croiser de deux sillages ("the crossing of two wakes") with actor and true crime author John Gilmore, then an actor in France who was working on a New Wave film with Jean Seberg. Gilmore told Paris Match: 'I felt a beautiful warmth with Bardot but found it difficult to discuss things in any depth whatsoever.' In the 1970s, she lived with the sculptor Miroslav Brozek and posed for some of his sculptures. In 1974 Bardot appeared in a nude photo shoot in the American magazine Playboy, which celebrated her 40th birthday. In 1973 just before her fortieth birthday, Bardot announced her retirement. After appearing in more than fifty motion pictures and recording several music albums, most notably with Serge Gainsbourg, she chose to use her fame to promote animal rights. In 1986 she established the Brigitte Bardot Foundation for the Welfare and Protection of Animals. She became a vegetarian and raised three million French francs to fund the foundation by auctioning off jewelry and many personal belongings. Today she is a strong animal rights activist and a major opponent of the consumption of horse meat. In support of animal protection, she condemned seal hunting in Canada during a visit to that country. She sought to discuss the issue with Stephen Harper, prime minister of Canada, though her request for a meeting was denied.[11] She once had a neighbor's donkey castrated while looking after it, on the grounds of its "sexual harassment" of her own donkey and mare, for which she was taken to court by the donkey's owner in 1989[12][13]. In 1999 Bardot wrote a letter to Chinese President Jiang Zemin, published in French magazine VSD, in which she accused the Chinese of "torturing bears and killing the world's last tigers and rhinos to make aphrodisiacs".[14] She has donated more than $140,000 over two years for a mass sterilization and adoption program for Bucharest's stray dogs, estimated to number 300,000.[15] She is planning to house many of these stray animals in a new animal rescue facility that she is having built on her property. The environmentally sound structure will be built out of recycled Pringles cans and reclaimed asphalt.[citation needed] Her husband Bernard d'Ormal is a former adviser of the far right "Front National" party.[9][16] Bardot has been convicted five times for "inciting racial hatred". In 1997 she was fined for her comments published in Le Figaro newspaper[17]. In 1998 she was convicted for making a statement about the growing number of mosques in France[17]. In a book she wrote in 1999, called "Le Carre de Pluton" (Pluto's Square), she criticizes the procedure used in the ritual slaughter of sheep during the Muslim festival of Eid al-Adha. For the comments, a French court fined her 30,000 francs in June 2000. [18] [19]. In a 2001 article named, Open Letter to My Lost France, she said: "...my country, France, my homeland, my land is again invaded by an overpopulation of foreigners, especially Muslims."[17][19] In her 2003 book, A Scream in the Silence, she warned of the €œIslamicization of France€, and said of Muslim immigration: "Over the last twenty years, we have given in to a subterranean, dangerous, and uncontrolled infiltration, which not only resists adjusting to our laws and customs but which will, as the years pass, attempt to impose its own."[20] In the book, she talks about her close homosexual friends, comparing them to today's homosexuals who, "jiggle their bottoms, put their little fingers in the air and with their little castrato voices moan about what those ghastly heteros put them through". She says French politicians are, "weather vanes who turn left or right as the fancy takes them... Not even French prostitutes are what they used to be". She says modern art has become "shit€”literally as well as figuratively."[21] In her defense, Bardot wrote a letter to a French gay magazine, saying, "Apart from my husband€”who maybe will cross over one day as well€”I am entirely surrounded by homos. For years, they have been my support, my friends, my adopted children, my confidants."[22] In May 2003 the Movement Against Racism and for Friendship between Peoples announced they were going to sue Bardot. The "Ligue des Droits de l'Homme" (The Human Rights League) announced they were considering similar legal proceedings.[19] Bardot denied the "racial hatred" charge and apologized in court, saying: "I never knowingly wanted to hurt anybody. It is not in my character." [24] She excused her opposition to interracial marriage stating that she was born in 1934 and such marriage was looked down on then[citation needed]. ....... She is liberal, yet isolationist, passionate in speech, but quick to retract and back down. She is quick to form relationships and equally quick to escape them. She is chaotic, opinionated, prone to both explode and implode, social-minded, imaginative, active and in her own way, quite wonderful. She's probably a tad on the Fi side of ENFpness, though I see Ne a plenty.
    .
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    9w1 sp/sx

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    Quote Originally Posted by implied
    dunno about ENFp, but that's basically amazing. i love her.
    .
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    Quote Originally Posted by Smilingeyes
    Here's where I can finally write something about clusters. I see an ENFp cluster of directors, all who possess a chaotic, visionary, slightly morbid and quirky eccentric style. They also have a recurring elements of childishness and dreamlikeness. The three that to me seem to form the core of this cluster are:

    Tim Burton


    Terry Gilliam


    Guillermo del Toro


    I think it's possible that David Lynch is also a member of this cluster
    .
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