View Poll Results: Who is the smarter person?

Voters
114. You may not vote on this poll
  • Intuitive Person

    0 0%
  • Sensing Person

    0 0%
  • Balanced Person

    0 0%
  • They are equal

    0 0%
  • 114 100.00%
Results 1 to 37 of 37

Thread: Intuition vs Sensing

  1. #1
    In Transition Raver's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    TIM
    Ne-IEE 6w7 sp/sx
    Posts
    3,703
    Mentioned
    92 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)

    Default Intuition vs. Sensing

    Which person overall is more intelligent? I hate having to say that one person is better than another, but what if that is the case? Being intuitive means that you have a biological computer in your head that works things out for you and can work on very complex abstract tasks. Being a sensing person makes you able to work on simple detailed tasks, but also able to do more complex as long as they don't get too abstract. I heard the reason there's so many sensing people is because not much would get down without them, what do you make of all this?

    At first insight I would say the intuitive person is smarter, however I feel that I could be very wrong and that I'm interpreting the situation wrong?
    "Nothing happens until the pain of staying the same outweighs the pain of change."

    Ne-IEE
    6w7 sp/sx
    6w7-4w5-9w1

  2. #2
    Hot Message FDG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Freiburg im Breisgau
    TIM
    ENTj
    Posts
    15,632
    Mentioned
    157 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Generally, intuitives are perceived as smarter than sensors, given the widespread meaning of the word "smart" - which is not necessarily equal to "Intelligent".
    Obsequium amicos, veritas odium parit

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    270
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    edit

  4. #4
    Creepy-

    Default

    The weird thing is, society perceives sensing people to be smarter due to the fact that they can memorize endless facts and be able to concentrate on any task on hand.

    Though, I think you guys are right about the types just being different, though equal in intelligence.

    Intelligence has little to do with type and has to do with other factors, or does personality type have a factor in intelligence?

  5. #5
    In Transition Raver's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    TIM
    Ne-IEE 6w7 sp/sx
    Posts
    3,703
    Mentioned
    92 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)

    Default

    I did above post.
    "Nothing happens until the pain of staying the same outweighs the pain of change."

    Ne-IEE
    6w7 sp/sx
    6w7-4w5-9w1

  6. #6
    Hot Message FDG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Freiburg im Breisgau
    TIM
    ENTj
    Posts
    15,632
    Mentioned
    157 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ILENTp
    There are many kinds of intelligence. Spatial, verbal, abstract, emotional, social etc.. And as FDG says, the word 'smart' is very ambiguous.
    I don't think it's ambguous.

    It has an accepted meaning in common everyday language - which is what the pool refers to.

    Given this meaning, yes, intuitives are on average smarter.

    However, this does not necessarily correlate intuitivness with intelligence - although I'm sure there is a correlation between N and score on standardized IQ tests, even though I have no data to prove my conjecture.
    Obsequium amicos, veritas odium parit

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    270
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    edit

  8. #8
    Creepy-

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ILENTp
    A person who finds practical solutions; fixes motors, pipes etc.. The type of person would never paint himself into a corner (if painting the floor), could be considered smart. He has smart solutions to practical problems.

    (Please don't be offended by my stereotypical description of a sensor.)
    Yes that is true, a sensing person tends to be good at fixing things. They're also good at completing tasks with ease without getting distracted.

    However an intuitive person can solve a seemingly impossible problem by using their intuition properly and experimenting with several ideas and it usually works.

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    270
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    edit

  10. #10
    In Transition Raver's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    TIM
    Ne-IEE 6w7 sp/sx
    Posts
    3,703
    Mentioned
    92 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)

    Default

    What about a person with a strong or , wouldn't this person be considered intelligent due to the fact that their strong thinking skills helps them use use any tool efficiently, solve problems and create things logically.
    "Nothing happens until the pain of staying the same outweighs the pain of change."

    Ne-IEE
    6w7 sp/sx
    6w7-4w5-9w1

  11. #11

    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    6,074
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    LOL@ this entire thread.


    BTW, sensors space out as much as intuitives do.
    MAYBE I'LL BREAK DOWN!!!


    Quote Originally Posted by vague
    Rocky's posts are as enjoyable as having wisdom teeth removed.

  12. #12
    Hot Message FDG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Freiburg im Breisgau
    TIM
    ENTj
    Posts
    15,632
    Mentioned
    157 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ILENTp
    A person who finds practical solutions; fixes motors, pipes etc.. The type of person would never paint himself into a corner (if painting the floor), could be considered smart. He has smart solutions to practical problems.

    (Please don't be offended by my stereotypical description of a sensor.)
    Think about what people think as "smart".

    It's not a mechanic.
    Obsequium amicos, veritas odium parit

  13. #13
    Hot Message FDG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Freiburg im Breisgau
    TIM
    ENTj
    Posts
    15,632
    Mentioned
    157 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ILENTp
    Ok, take as an example. People who know which buttons to push and which contacts they need are considered smart. Knowin how to get other people to do stuff is considered smart.
    No way.

    You're just stretching your Ne.
    Obsequium amicos, veritas odium parit

  14. #14

    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    270
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    edit

  15. #15
    In Transition Raver's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    TIM
    Ne-IEE 6w7 sp/sx
    Posts
    3,703
    Mentioned
    92 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ILENTp
    Hehe, ok here's an analogy.

    If intelligence is the speed of the processor in a computer. Sensing and intuition is just a matter of which programs you run on the computer.
    I like this metaphor, it explains it pretty well. I see it more as not which programs, but what platform is run, whether it be Windows 98 or Spheres? You get the picture?

    I feel that and parts of the computer deal with running advanced programs and and makes sure they correspond well with the computer to run efficiently. Heh, I hope that makes sense.
    "Nothing happens until the pain of staying the same outweighs the pain of change."

    Ne-IEE
    6w7 sp/sx
    6w7-4w5-9w1

  16. #16

    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    270
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    edit

  17. #17
    Hot Message FDG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Freiburg im Breisgau
    TIM
    ENTj
    Posts
    15,632
    Mentioned
    157 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ILENTp
    Hehe, ok here's an analogy.

    If intelligence is the speed of the processor in a computer. Sensing and intuition is just a matter of which programs you run on the computer.
    Exactly.

    But what do you think will be perceived as "smart"; MatLab or AdobePhotoshop?
    Obsequium amicos, veritas odium parit

  18. #18

    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    270
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    edit

  19. #19

    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    237
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ILENTp
    Hehe, ok here's an analogy.

    If intelligence is the speed of the processor in a computer. Sensing and intuition is just a matter of which programs you run on the computer.

    N operating system = Has drivers for lots of technologies, even the ones that don't exist... And implements lines of codes that aren't useful yet but might be useful someday. Suffice to say this system crashes alot

    S operating system = Robust, stable, does what it's supposed to do, but slower in implementing change because it only accepts WHQL certified drivers

    (P operating system = Multitask, but task completion depends on the number of parralel processes running.

    J operating system = Singletask and has the annoying habit to insist on scanning your pc for viruses every week at the same day and time.)
    ENTj - intuitive subtype - 8w9, sp/sx

  20. #20

    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    6,074
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FDG
    However, this does not necessarily correlate intuitivness with intelligence - although I'm sure there is a correlation between N and score on standardized IQ tests, even though I have no data to prove my conjecture.
    Oh, and I just remebered... socionic tests have the ISFj as scoring with the highest IQ.


    Quote Originally Posted by Eidos
    S operating system = Robust, stable, does what it's supposed to do, but slower in implementing change because it only accepts WHQL certified drivers
    Fuck you, I'm not gonna do what you want me to do!
    MAYBE I'LL BREAK DOWN!!!


    Quote Originally Posted by vague
    Rocky's posts are as enjoyable as having wisdom teeth removed.

  21. #21

    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    237
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Rocky

    Quote Originally Posted by Eidos
    S operating system = Robust, stable, does what it's supposed to do, but slower in implementing change because it only accepts WHQL certified drivers
    Fuck you, I'm not gonna do what you want me to do!
    That sounds like a Rage Against the Machine song... Zack de la Rocha, ISTP?
    ENTj - intuitive subtype - 8w9, sp/sx

  22. #22

    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    270
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    edit

  23. #23

    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    237
    Mentioned
    2 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ILENTp
    The analogy wasn't meant to be taken that literally. When you start to get technical it doesn't apply anymore (like with intuition).
    =>
    ENTj - intuitive subtype - 8w9, sp/sx

  24. #24
    Hot Message FDG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Freiburg im Breisgau
    TIM
    ENTj
    Posts
    15,632
    Mentioned
    157 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Rocky
    Quote Originally Posted by FDG
    However, this does not necessarily correlate intuitivness with intelligence - although I'm sure there is a correlation between N and score on standardized IQ tests, even though I have no data to prove my conjecture.
    Oh, and I just remebered... socionic tests have the ISFj as scoring with the highest IQ.
    This means nothing.

    First of all, give me the link of the pages.

    Second, one sensing type scoring with the highest IQ doesn not imply that Ns don't have, on average, higher scores, since there are 16 types.
    Obsequium amicos, veritas odium parit

  25. #25
    Hot Message FDG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Freiburg im Breisgau
    TIM
    ENTj
    Posts
    15,632
    Mentioned
    157 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Rocky

    Quote Originally Posted by Eidos
    S operating system = Robust, stable, does what it's supposed to do, but slower in implementing change because it only accepts WHQL certified drivers
    Fuck you, I'm not gonna do what you want me to do!
    Exactly because you already do it! It's recursive!
    Obsequium amicos, veritas odium parit

  26. #26

    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    270
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    edit

  27. #27
    Creepy-

    Default

    My answer is none of the above. I don't think S or N has anything to do with "smarts", nor are they equal.

    Quote Originally Posted by FDG

    Think about what people think as "smart".

    It's not a mechanic.
    An N person could make a very good mechanic actually. My husband (ENTp) was amzing at anything mechanical. He could see how it worked in his head, and then know exactly how to fix it. It was fun watching him build computers and stuff, and he had topographic maps in his head, from what he did for a job and the guy he worked for said he'd never met anyone who had such capabilities to understand the possibilities and workings of things. He had these maps, tied in with the well locations and a whole access database, and wow, I wish I could explain it, very complex and amazing. He always said his dream job would be an idea-man, just coming up with new ideas, inventions, possibilities for things, he was extremely good at this. And, so was my grandpa. My dad has said that if they had ever met, it'd be non-stop ideas, and neither of them would ever stop. My grandpa was a tool-designer for Douglas Aircraft, but also worked as a gardener on the side. He was in high demand because he really knew his plants, very well, above and beyond what most did. They moved to CO and he became a farmer, and then later to TX where he became the head of the paint crew at a local college. So, even though his job was painting, that doesn't mean he wasn't extremely smart. And my dad is a carpenter, but I've never met anyone who understands physics like he does, or most science and history. He taught science and history for awhile, took every single class offered in both subjects when he was in college, but got his degree in theology. And my grandma, was an artist, you'd think sensory right, but she was also a mathematical genius, arriving at answers to complex problems, just by knowing the answer not having to even work it out. Her abilities scared her, so she never did anything to develop them any further.

    Point is, people have different talents and abilities and "smarts" are not tied to type.

  28. #28
    Creepy-Diana

    Default

    .

  29. #29
    Hot Message FDG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Freiburg im Breisgau
    TIM
    ENTj
    Posts
    15,632
    Mentioned
    157 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Anonymous
    My answer is none of the above. I don't think S or N has anything to do with "smarts", nor are they equal.

    Quote Originally Posted by FDG

    Think about what people think as "smart".

    It's not a mechanic.
    An N person could make a very good mechanic actually. My husband (ENTp) was amzing at anything mechanical. He could see how it worked in his head, and then know exactly how to fix it. It was fun watching him build computers and stuff, and he had topographic maps in his head, from what he did for a job and the guy he worked for said he'd never met anyone who had such capabilities to understand the possibilities and workings of things. He had these maps, tied in with the well locations and a whole access database, and wow, I wish I could explain it, very complex and amazing. He always said his dream job would be an idea-man, just coming up with new ideas, inventions, possibilities for things, he was extremely good at this. And, so was my grandpa. My dad has said that if they had ever met, it'd be non-stop ideas, and neither of them would ever stop. My grandpa was a tool-designer for Douglas Aircraft, but also worked as a gardener on the side. He was in high demand because he really knew his plants, very well, above and beyond what most did. They moved to CO and he became a farmer, and then later to TX where he became the head of the paint crew at a local college. So, even though his job was painting, that doesn't mean he wasn't extremely smart. And my dad is a carpenter, but I've never met anyone who understands physics like he does, or most science and history. He taught science and history for awhile, took every single class offered in both subjects when he was in college, but got his degree in theology. And my grandma, was an artist, you'd think sensory right, but she was also a mathematical genius, arriving at answers to complex problems, just by knowing the answer not having to even work it out. Her abilities scared her, so she never did anything to develop them any further.

    Point is, people have different talents and abilities and "smarts" are not tied to type.
    Well, you're speaking of people that have various abilities.

    My post speaks about a mechanic; and moreover it's a reply that you've taken out of context.

    However, your family sounds like a great one! You have not stated their types, though. They might very well be all Ns.
    Obsequium amicos, veritas odium parit

  30. #30

    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    180
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    If I were to define intelligence I would define it as "the capacity to learn." If the functions are indeed "cognitve processes" as I believe one website calls them, then in terms of socionics, intelligence could be defined as the capacity to perceive and interpret information. Sensing and intuition are both valid ways of perceiving information. The way in which one perceives information really says nothing about their capacity for perceiving information. On average, sensors and intuitives are probably equally intelligent but I guess how manifest that intelligence would be depends on what sort of envirnoment they are placed in. For example, in a culture, place, or setting that values sensing, intuitives might come off as less intelligent and vice-versa. Maybe. I don't know about this for sure; I'm just trying to think of reasons for the existance of a thread such as this one. America is supposedly an ENTj culture, isn't it?
    Lyricist

    "Supposing the entity of the poet to be represented by the number 10, it is certain that a chemist, on analyzing it, would find it to be composed of one part interest and nine parts vanity." (Victor Hugo)

  31. #31
    Banned
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    TIM
    TiNe
    Posts
    7,967
    Mentioned
    11 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tempus
    If I were to define intelligence I would define it as "the capacity to learn." If the functions are indeed "cognitve processes" as I believe one website calls them, then in terms of socionics, intelligence could be defined as the capacity to perceive and interpret information. Sensing and intuition are both valid ways of perceiving information. The way in which one perceives information really says nothing about their capacity for perceiving information. On average, sensors and intuitives are probably equally intelligent but I guess how manifest that intelligence would be depends on what sort of envirnoment they are placed in. For example, in a culture, place, or setting that values sensing, intuitives might come off as less intelligent and vice-versa. Maybe. I don't know about this for sure; I'm just trying to think of reasons for the existance of a thread such as this one. America is supposedly an ENTj culture, isn't it?
    A democracy's culture reflects its leader. Nowadays, you've gotta "network" to be employed anywhere. Was "networking" essential, or even helpful, under Clinton? Not really. ESTps are the best at networking people together, because they are apt to use people for specific social functions. I remember an ESTp I met in a computer class, who I helped out a lot, telling me that whether or not we could be friends depended on if he could fit me into his network....

    I really have no apetite for networking, and the ENTJs I know are more interested in putting people into heiarchies than networks. I think networking is an ESTp-related craze, and I suspect it will die down after Bush leaves office, just as the random hiring craze of the 90s did after Clinton left.

    The president controls law enforcement, and by proxy the national superego. "In" trends mirror the president's personality, and the face of popular rebellion is that which the president detests. Basically, the president shapes the flow of our lives.

  32. #32

    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    westfield, nj usa
    Posts
    529
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Intuition vs. Sensing

    Quote Originally Posted by Young_and_Confused
    Which person overall is more intelligent? I hate having to say that one person is better than another, but what if that is the case? Being intuitive means that you have a biological computer in your head that works things out for you and can work on very complex abstract tasks. Being a sensing person makes you able to work on simple detailed tasks, but also able to do more complex as long as they don't get too abstract. I heard the reason there's so many sensing people is because not much would get down without them, what do you make of all this?

    At first insight I would say the intuitive person is smarter, however I feel that I could be very wrong and that I'm interpreting the situation wrong?
    i don't think it's about intelligence. you need to know something before intuition kicks in. i have both pretty equally. i can focus on things that are step by step to the letter of the law, in fine detailed ways. and at the same time i can abstract new information of why something doesn't work, or how something should go together long after the instructions were lost.

    neither is more intelligent, i think it's how you use the skill. on the outside intuitive people seem smarter because they got the answer quickly without thinking that much. they simply know what needs to be done and when. sensing might seem smarter because you might be able to remember a list in the proper order. i don't have the best examples, since i may do them automatically.

    it's better that there are a small amout of dreamers, we wouldn't get anything done. it might be a fun society, but maybe not as productive. it would be like living with all artists. not that it's a bad thing, but...

  33. #33

    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    TIM
    LII
    Posts
    437
    Mentioned
    5 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default

    come on! define intelligence first. i refuse to vote until 'intelligence' is defined for the purposes of this vote.

  34. #34
    Creepy-

    Default Re: Intuition vs. Sensing

    Quote Originally Posted by mike_INTJ
    neither is more intelligent, i think it's how you use the skill. on the outside intuitive people seem smarter because they got the answer quickly without thinking that much. they simply know what needs to be done and when. sensing might seem smarter because you might be able to remember a list in the proper order. i don't have the best examples, since i may do them automatically.

    As you state, ON THE OUTSIDE intuitive people seem smarter, and since it's only the outside that counts in defining a set of behaviour associated to the word "smart", intuitives are smarter.

  35. #35

    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    westfield, nj usa
    Posts
    529
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Intuition vs. Sensing

    Quote Originally Posted by Anonymous
    Quote Originally Posted by mike_INTJ
    neither is more intelligent, i think it's how you use the skill. on the outside intuitive people seem smarter because they got the answer quickly without thinking that much. they simply know what needs to be done and when. sensing might seem smarter because you might be able to remember a list in the proper order. i don't have the best examples, since i may do them automatically.

    As you state, ON THE OUTSIDE intuitive people seem smarter, and since it's only the outside that counts in defining a set of behaviour associated to the word "smart", intuitives are smarter.
    false conclusion. i know people that have a very strong intuitive factor - yet are so totally stupid when it comes to other things - it's really pathetic. just because you have the tools, doesn't mean you know how to use it.

  36. #36
    Hot Message FDG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Freiburg im Breisgau
    TIM
    ENTj
    Posts
    15,632
    Mentioned
    157 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Intuition vs. Sensing

    Quote Originally Posted by mike_INTJ
    Quote Originally Posted by Anonymous
    Quote Originally Posted by mike_INTJ
    neither is more intelligent, i think it's how you use the skill. on the outside intuitive people seem smarter because they got the answer quickly without thinking that much. they simply know what needs to be done and when. sensing might seem smarter because you might be able to remember a list in the proper order. i don't have the best examples, since i may do them automatically.

    As you state, ON THE OUTSIDE intuitive people seem smarter, and since it's only the outside that counts in defining a set of behaviour associated to the word "smart", intuitives are smarter.
    false conclusion. i know people that have a very strong intuitive factor - yet are so totally stupid when it comes to other things - it's really pathetic. just because you have the tools, doesn't mean you know how to use it.
    "I know people".

    Are these people the majority of Ns? No.
    Obsequium amicos, veritas odium parit

  37. #37

    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    westfield, nj usa
    Posts
    529
    Mentioned
    1 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)

    Default Re: Intuition vs. Sensing

    Quote Originally Posted by FDG
    Quote Originally Posted by mike_INTJ
    Quote Originally Posted by Anonymous
    Quote Originally Posted by mike_INTJ
    neither is more intelligent, i think it's how you use the skill. on the outside intuitive people seem smarter because they got the answer quickly without thinking that much. they simply know what needs to be done and when. sensing might seem smarter because you might be able to remember a list in the proper order. i don't have the best examples, since i may do them automatically.

    As you state, ON THE OUTSIDE intuitive people seem smarter, and since it's only the outside that counts in defining a set of behaviour associated to the word "smart", intuitives are smarter.
    false conclusion. i know people that have a very strong intuitive factor - yet are so totally stupid when it comes to other things - it's really pathetic. just because you have the tools, doesn't mean you know how to use it.
    "I know people".

    Are these people the majority of Ns? No.
    are you saying your intuition is so strong that it can read my mind? because it ain't that strong.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •