View Poll Results: Scorsese's type?

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Thread: Martin Scorsese

  1. #1
    ...been here longer than the fucking monarchy Ezra's Avatar
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    Default Martin Scorsese

    After finding that interview with him and DDL, I thought "I know, let's type Scorsese".
















    Ideas?

    I see a lot of Ne there. And a lot in his films as well.
    Last edited by silke; 09-07-2014 at 06:47 AM. Reason: fixed links
    Ideas don't determine who's right. Power determines who's right. And I have the power. So I'm right.

  2. #2
    from toronto with love ScarlettLux's Avatar
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    BUMP! I really want to know this, am watching Taxi Driver atm.


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    Snomunegot munenori2's Avatar
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    Hmm, I peruse the interviews later, but he did a decent job of adapting 'The Age of Innocence' to film.
    Moonlight will fall
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  4. #4
    ...been here longer than the fucking monarchy Ezra's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ScarlettLux View Post
    BUMP! I really want to know this, am watching Taxi Driver atm.
    You type while... watching a film?

    Philistine!
    Ideas don't determine who's right. Power determines who's right. And I have the power. So I'm right.

  5. #5
    Let's fly now Gilly's Avatar
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    Some dynamic type, not Gamma. SEI, SLI, ESE, IEI come to mind, but he's probably not IEI. I'm leaning Alpha SF, maybe SEI-Si.
    But, for a certainty, back then,
    We loved so many, yet hated so much,
    We hurt others and were hurt ourselves...

    Yet even then, we ran like the wind,
    Whilst our laughter echoed,
    Under cerulean skies...

  6. #6
    Let's fly now Gilly's Avatar
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    Why are there so effing many Alphas who are movie directors? Lucas, Spielberg, maybe Scorsese...
    Last edited by Gilly; 05-01-2012 at 01:53 PM.
    But, for a certainty, back then,
    We loved so many, yet hated so much,
    We hurt others and were hurt ourselves...

    Yet even then, we ran like the wind,
    Whilst our laughter echoed,
    Under cerulean skies...

  7. #7
    Let's fly now Gilly's Avatar
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    I think he's definitely Fe ego. He reminds me a bit of Dennis Hopper. Leaning IEI.
    But, for a certainty, back then,
    We loved so many, yet hated so much,
    We hurt others and were hurt ourselves...

    Yet even then, we ran like the wind,
    Whilst our laughter echoed,
    Under cerulean skies...

  8. #8

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    don't think he's IEI...seems extroverted to me

  9. #9
    Let's fly now Gilly's Avatar
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    I dunno...he's hard to pin...
    But, for a certainty, back then,
    We loved so many, yet hated so much,
    We hurt others and were hurt ourselves...

    Yet even then, we ran like the wind,
    Whilst our laughter echoed,
    Under cerulean skies...

  10. #10
    strrrng's Avatar
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    Ni-EIE
    4w3-5w6-8w7

  11. #11
    Let's fly now Gilly's Avatar
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    idk why but he feels IP to me, like the high-strung/nervousness thing is secondary.
    But, for a certainty, back then,
    We loved so many, yet hated so much,
    We hurt others and were hurt ourselves...

    Yet even then, we ran like the wind,
    Whilst our laughter echoed,
    Under cerulean skies...

  12. #12
    Exits, pursued by a bear. Animal's Avatar
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    I can see IEI actually. He reminds me of that Brandon Flowers guy that was posted earlier.
    "How could we forget those ancient myths that stand at the beginning of all races, the myths about dragons that at the last moment are transformed into princesses? Perhaps all the dragons in our lives are princesses who are only waiting to see us act, just once, with beauty and courage. Perhaps everything that frightens us is, in its deepest essence, something helpless that wants our love."
    -- Rainer Maria Rilke, Letters to a Young Poet

  13. #13
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    tentatively typing him as SLI sp/so

    Judging by his speech constructs, he is Dynamic Positivist i.e. one of these types: IEI, SLI, LIE, ESE. From his interviews it was evident that he is quite talented at analyzing the technical aspects of film-making, recollecting and weaving his sensory impressions into his work, which makes SLI a more plausible typing than the other three types. He's quite responsive to the sensory stimuli around him:

    -My mother goes to shop there still, up until a couple of months ago, she used to go there. Also you knew with the meat, you knew the meat was fresh. You'd see the meat being ground properly into chopped meat.

    -Mr. Torminelli's was a grocery store, small but I'll never forget, I would go and have lunch there, I would go and order a sandwich at lunchtime to bring it back to school. I will never forget the barrels filled with olives and the rind, the smell of that. And the extraordinary smells when you walked into that grocery store of the spiced ham and all the other cold cuts and that sort of thing, and the tuna fish salads that he made.

    -You were going to check out the vegetables. It was like a living organism in a way.

    -I think I know how to shoot it, but I don't know how to light it. And I realize it's because I didn't grow up with light. I grew up in tenements. ... You know, I didn't know where the light would come from when I went to shoot films. And the films I usually wind up doing are urban films anyway. So the light usually is -- you turn the light on. That's the lighting for the picture. But the thing about it is that I was always aware of the streets at night. Looking out the widow or coming home at night.
     

    On Village Life On Elizabeth Street:
    What was happening at 232 Elizabeth Street was that people from one town in Sicily were coming in and staying in that one building so that 232 became Cirmina, which is a beautiful town outside of Palermo that my mother's mother comes from. Now 241 across the street, the same thing was happening but mainly with people from Pulizi, which is also outside of Palermo but higher in the mountains. That's where my father's father comes from. So they were across the street and my mother said that when she met my father, there was a problem because they were different nationalities. She used the phrase "different nationalities," in reality it's just from different villages.

    On The Neighborhood:
    In our neighborhood, there were only Italian-Americans basically. There was one woman on Elizabeth Street in the butcher shop directly across from 241. She's still there, she's 90 years old, she's still cutting meat. It's Mary the Butcher. You should go there and interview her. She is tough spitting, been there 60 years. She's something, she was in my first movie, I put her in my first film, Mary the Butcher. My mother goes to shop there still, up until a couple of months ago, she used to go there. Also you knew with the meat, you knew the meat was fresh. You'd see the meat being ground properly into chopped meat. You were going to check out the vegetables. It was like a living organism in a way. It was like the actual village life -- I didn't realize it at the time, but it was like a village in Sicily. There was one place, Mr. Torminelli's, -- Mr. Torminelli's was a grocery store, small but I'll never forget, I would go and have lunch there, I would go and order a sandwich at lunchtime to bring it back to school. I will never forget the barrels filled with olives and the rind, the smell of that. And the extraordinary smells when you walked into that grocery store of the spiced ham and all the other cold cuts and that sort of thing, and the tuna fish salads that he made.

    On His Grandmother's Window:
    I will never forget that view from the window sill. Life had to go on, you know. We would look and we could see the other people directly across the street, directly in their windows, especially if it was summer. You could see what was going on, you would know if they were having a fight, you would hear what they were saying -- I mean, very often in the buildings, if there was a fight, a family fight, invariably other friends of the building would come in -- other people from other apartments, to try to calm people down because it could get very, very hysterical. I mean people just living on top of each other. But from that window you could see everything. I used to watch Mary the Butcher cutting the meat. In fact I opened WHO'S THAT KNOCKING? with that shot from my grandmother's window. We shot in her apartment. There was a little luncheonette right next door. I think her name was Mary too. She was really nice. And I would go in there after school and play the juke box in the early 50s -- Perry Como, the theme from ANNA, that Italian film by La Tuada, music like that.

    ON LIGHTING:
    I was saying as a joke the other day that I love film editing, I know how to cut a picture, I think I know how to shoot it, but I don't know how to light it. And I realize it's because I didn't grow up with light. I grew up in tenements. It doesn't make a tenement a bad word. It sounds like the slums and everything. But it was really a neighborhood. It was like a village. It was kind of a very strong life force. But at the same time the light was all artificial. So I didn't know. You know, I didn't know where the light would come from when I went to shoot films. And the films I usually wind up doing are urban films anyway. So the light usually is -- you turn the light on. That's the lighting for the picture. But the thing about it is that I was always aware of the streets at night. Looking out the widow or coming home at night. And in 1964, they changed to the halogen lamps. But there was something romantic about the streets at night before the halogen lamps, and haunting, almost at times a little melancholy, and at times exhilarating, very exhilarating.

    Q: How did the casting of the two Kates come together?
    SCORSESE: Kate Beckinsale came in and it was the first audition for Ava Gardner… She was terrific. She was sultry and she's a beautiful woman, a very good actress. I've always liked her. I've seen all her work, and I was glad that she's agreed to audition… She asked what she should do before the audition, and I told her to just watch Mogambo, John Ford's version of Red Dust with Clark Gable and Grace Kelly and Ava Gardner playing Honey Bear… That swagger, that wise guy attitude. . . Beckinsale, when you first see her on the screen, trying to decide what name she should give TWA Airlines, she's absolutely gorgeous… You have that sense of Ava Gardner there. The scene where she hits him with the ashtray is based on a fight between the two of them. She wouldn't take anything from him, nothing. She says in her autobiography, little did I realize we would be friends for 22 years… They were like hanging out for 22 years. Cate Blanchett, on the other hand, I thought of Cate, we were starting to shoot our film sooner… She came into LA while still shooting The Missing… [We met] for about three hours talking about it… She had looked at some stills of Katharine Hepburn… Hepburn is a touchy area. There are three levels there. [There are] the older people who really know Katharine Hepburn, who may have been alive in the Thirties, and know all about her career and everything else. There's the midway, which is me. I'm 62 but I was 10 years old when I saw her movies. I didn't know about the 1930s, her trouble with box-office poison, she always seemed to be a star to me… And because of that, I felt, 'Yes, let us try to do Katharine Hepurn in a film… An actress of great intelligence and courage. And we discussed levels of accent, we discussed. And she came and said, 'Look, I looked at some pictures of Katharine Hepburn and there's a couple here. And she got in a certain position, sort of on her haunches, Cate Blanchett, and she said, 'I think she was like this. That's the way she was sitting on the beach when Howard comes up and asks her to go golfing with him.' That was taken from a PR still off the set. And she just had it, the gesture she had, she had the lines, the look to be Katharine Hepburn…

    Q: When you approach biographical materials, are there very specific ways, or is it different for each one?
    SCORSESE:He came attached to the project. I felt that the main thing for me is that it's a hard character to play to say the least. But he had such a determination. I mean, more than half of it is wanting to do it, really wanting to do it. Then quite honestly, I thought particularly the young Howard Hughes, like when he's at the Grauman's Chinese and he's in tails, he did seem to me, when I looked at some of the earlier photographs of Howard Hughes, you've got to look at some real early stuff when he was still dressing before he gets the clothes from Penny's or Sears and he's saying, 'Better make it Woolworth,' or whatever he's saying on that paranoid phone call to Noah Dietrich. I mean, before that he was in Seville Row clothes. He was really a dandy [dresser]. When he burns his clothes, that's a key moment. He changes everything, but I must say that I saw a similarity, and I do feel if you ever find some really early photographs of him, because he always appeared, Howard Hughes, even in the photographs of him going out every night with these different starlets he always made a face. He didn't want to be photographed, but he wanted to be, and he was always in an odd position. But the lankiness, the tallness, the frame itself, I felt that he did remind me of the young Howard Hughes, the real young Howard Hughes and then later the older Howard Hughes certainly. The one with the mustache after the plane crash, he just suddenly sort of became Howard Hughes at that point even with the application of seven and a half hours of makeup in that screening room scene where he's naked. Seven and a half hours each day. I'd sort of walk in that room, look at all the tissue paper and the mess. There was two weeks of shooting that.

    Q: How does it feel to have inspired a generation of filmmakers and what do you expect from yourself now?
    SCORSESE: That's a good question. In the '80's, I was sort of on the outskirts of the industry to a certain extent and I sort of had to make films all over again, lower budget films until I got The Color of Money, and that sort of thing, until I hit back to stories that I really wanted to make, like, The Last Temptation of Christ. But since then, Raging Bull, I've been reassessed in '89 and GoodFellas came out and some things, I felt that I was real lucky to have lived through a period where people could come back and say, 'Hey, that stuff that you did in the '70's, that was pretty good.' Then to even hear about these kids doing films that are very influenced by Mean Streets of all things. It's a real honor if they really have been. There've been a number of people around the world, Chinese filmmakers have been influenced by the picture and that's great. The problem for me ultimately, and I'm glad because it gives me, when I see their films I get excited. It's almost like having an illness where you suddenly you have more of it thrown into you every time that you see these films and it generates a lot of energy and a lot of excitement to see new, young filmmakers pictures that show me a new way of seeing the world visually and emotionally. But for me to make my own films, I just have to remain true to what the picture is and know that that's the story that I really want to tell and know that I'm going to use a certain style and what I want to achieve with it and the marketplace for it too. When you make a picture, a big budget picture like this, you know, it's a pretty big marketplace and I was very lucky to have fallen upon the situation with John Logan and Leo and Michael Mann, all of them that had created a story about a man that I could identify with, feel for him, empathize with him, a visionary who also had tragic flaws. I think that kind of makes me feel comfortable with the material. But there's no doubt that every time I make a picture, there's a part of me that thinks, 'Well, what are they expecting?' I just like to be able to be true to what the film is and maybe scale down in the future.
    Last edited by silke; 11-12-2014 at 10:35 AM.

  14. #14
    stray's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by siuntal View Post
    This narrows his typing down to IEI and SLI, and I am just not getting Beta vibes from him.
    About the only thing I can think that points to beta is how well he works with possible Betas (DeNiro, Day Lewis, Dicaprio, and Sharon Stone all might be Beta ST imo). And these go beyond mere professional relationships.. They're the actors he lets in his little inner sanctum and can speak easily too. He keeps many others at a distance apparently.

  15. #15
    Miso Soup's Avatar
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    I agree with IEI.

  16. #16
    Haikus Beautiful sky's Avatar
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    SLI

  17. #17
    Breaking stereotypes Suz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stray View Post
    About the only thing I can think that points to beta is how well he works with possible Betas (DeNiro, Day Lewis, Dicaprio, and Sharon Stone all might be Beta ST imo). And these go beyond mere professional relationships.. They're the actors he lets in his little inner sanctum and can speak easily too. He keeps many others at a distance apparently.
    I thought DeNiro is LSE?
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    Quote Originally Posted by WorkaholicsAnon View Post
    I thought DeNiro is LSE?
    Maybe he is. That'd change a lot of things.

    He's kind of hard to pin down.

  19. #19
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    saw taxi driver for the first time the other day
    4w3-5w6-8w7

  20. #20
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    Bump.

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