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Thread: Fictional Gamma Quadra Characters In Movies and Literature

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    Landlord of the Dog and Duck Subteigh's Avatar
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    Default Fictional Gamma Quadra Characters In Movies and Literature

    from socionics.org

    ISFj\ESI
    Clyde Griffiths - An American Tragedy by Theodore Dreiser (can be accessed from this page, though it's apparently illegal to do so if you live in the U.S.)
    Sonya Rostov – War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy
    Dolly Oblonskaya - Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy

    ESFp\SEE
    Buratino - The Golden Key\Adventures of Buratino (the Russian Pinocchio ) by Aleksey Tolstoy
    Anna Karenina - Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
    Nastasya Filippovna – The Idiot by Fyodor Dostoevsky
    Neznaika - The Adventures of Neznaika and His Friends by Nikolay Nosov
    Nozdryov - Dead Souls by Nikolai Gogol
    Natasha Rostova – War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy

    INTp\ILI
    Mstislav Los' - Aelita by Aleksey Tolstoy
    Pierre Bezukhov - War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy
    Pechorin - A Hero of Our Time by Mikhail Lermontov

    ENTj\LIE
    Smoke Bellew - Smoke Bellew by Jack London
    Ostap Bender – The Twelve Chairs + The Golden Calf by Ilf and Petrov
    Garin - The Hyperboloid of Engineer Garin by Aleksey Tolstoy
    Martin Eden - Martin Eden by Jack London

    Expat's suggestions:

    Odysseus and Penelope in Homer's The Odyssey
    Heathcliff and Cathy in Wuthering
    Heights
    Last edited by Subteigh; 04-10-2008 at 09:13 PM.

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    Expat's Avatar
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    ENTj - ISFj:

    Odysseus and Penelope in Homer's The Odyssey

    Heathcliff and Cathy in Wuthering Heights
    , LIE, ENTj logical subtype, 8w9 sx/sp
    Quote Originally Posted by implied
    gah you're like the shittiest ENTj ever!

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    Garmonbozia's Avatar
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    Default Re: Fictional Gamma Characters In Literature

    Quote Originally Posted by Subterranean
    from socionics.org

    ISFj\ESI
    Clyde Griffiths - An American Tragedy by Theodore Dreiser
    Sonya Rostov – War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy
    Dolly Oblonskaya - Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy

    ESFp\SEE
    Buratino - The Golden Key\Adventures of Buratino (the Russian Pinocchio ) by Aleksey Tolstoy
    Anna Karenina - Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
    Nastasya Filippovna – The Idiot by Fyodor Dostoevsky
    Neznaika - The Adventures of Neznaika and His Friends by Nikolay Nosov
    Nozdryov - Dead Souls by Nikolai Gogol
    Natasha Rostova – War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy

    INTp\ILI
    Mstislav Los' - Aelita by Aleksey Tolstoy
    Pierre Bezukhov - War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy
    Pechorin - A Hero of Our Time by Mikhail Lermontov

    ENTj\LIE
    Smoke Bellew - Smoke Bellew by Jack London
    Ostap Bender – The Twelve Chairs + The Golden Calf by Ilf and Petrov
    Garin - The Hyperboloid of Engineer Garin by Aleksey Tolstoy
    Martin Eden - Martin Eden by Jack London
    He/She is a Tolstoy person. It seems to happen that people either favor Dostoevsky or Tolstoy. I, myself, am a Dostoevsky girl.

    I wonder which one of these writers is more "gamma". I think perhaps Tolstoy (not because of this list).

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    Landlord of the Dog and Duck Subteigh's Avatar
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    There's 1 Dostoevsky in Alpha, 2 in Beta and 2 in Delta . Also, there's a Tolstoy author who isn't called Leo, so it distorts it a bit.
    EII-Ne
    5w4 or 1w9 Sp/So

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    Quote Originally Posted by Subterranean
    There's 1 Dostoevsky in Alpha, 2 in Beta and 2 in Delta . Also, there's a Tolstoy author who isn't called Leo, so it distorts it a bit.
    Aleksey isn't very good.

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    You've actually read one of his books? I think I've only read the first few pages of War and Peace out of the books on this list.
    EII-Ne
    5w4 or 1w9 Sp/So

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    I've read everything on the list aside from the Gogol.

    I'm a dork.

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    I haven't read anything from that list Does that make me cool?

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    Quote Originally Posted by XoX
    I haven't read anything from that list Does that make me cool?
    You bet!

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    I've added links to all the texts available online for free - you might not like reading them on a computer, but you could just read the brief extracts concerning the relevant character or see if you like the book, and then buy a physical copy.
    .
    EII-Ne
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    reading is annoying
    INTp

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    Upon reading Anna Karenina not too long ago (though I only made it halfway before getting sidetracked), I became convinced that Levin is an INTp.
    ENTj




    "A conscience does not prevent sin. It only prevents you from enjoying it..."

    "All men dream, but not equally. Those who dream by night in the dusty recesses of their minds, wake in the day to find that it was vanity: but the dreamers of the day are dangerous men, for they may act on their dreams with open eyes, to make them possible."
    - Thomas E Lawrence

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    Great book though, perhaps one of the greatest I've ever read. I am going to start it again from the beginning, and actually finish it, once I get some free time.

    I'm really interested in what type Tolstoy could be, any thoughts?
    ENTj




    "A conscience does not prevent sin. It only prevents you from enjoying it..."

    "All men dream, but not equally. Those who dream by night in the dusty recesses of their minds, wake in the day to find that it was vanity: but the dreamers of the day are dangerous men, for they may act on their dreams with open eyes, to make them possible."
    - Thomas E Lawrence

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    anna karenina was the introductory statement of the worst literature class i ever took.

    it was atrocious, from what i remember.


    i do remember considering anna karenina as SEE, after having read it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by niffweed17 View Post
    anna karenina was the introductory statement of the worst literature class i ever took.

    it was atrocious, from what i remember.


    i do remember considering anna karenina as SEE, after having read it.
    You were probably reading off a shitty translation, as they can be different as night and day. Anyways, taste in literature is one of the most subjective things possible.

    A survey of 125 British and American writers resulted in this list of the Top Ten Greatest Books of All Time.

    1. Anna Karenina, by Leo Tolstoy
    2. Madame Bovary, by Gustave Flaubert
    3. War and Peace, by Leo Tolstoy
    4. Lolita, by Vladimir Nabokov
    5. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, by Mark Twain
    6. Hamlet, by William Shakespeare
    7. The Great Gatsby, by F. Scott Fitzgerald
    8. In Search of Lost Time, by Marcel Proust
    9. The stories of Anton Chekhov
    10. Middlemarch, by George Eliot



    Again, I don't doubt that the book seems atrocious to you. I am not really trying to prove anything, but I wouldn't want anyone who hasn't read it to be discouraged from what I feel is a great piece of literature.
    ENTj




    "A conscience does not prevent sin. It only prevents you from enjoying it..."

    "All men dream, but not equally. Those who dream by night in the dusty recesses of their minds, wake in the day to find that it was vanity: but the dreamers of the day are dangerous men, for they may act on their dreams with open eyes, to make them possible."
    - Thomas E Lawrence

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    ~~rubicon~~ Rubicon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pezzonovante View Post
    Great book though, perhaps one of the greatest I've ever read. I am going to start it again from the beginning, and actually finish it, once I get some free time.

    I'm really interested in what type Tolstoy could be, any thoughts?
    Apparently the character of Levin was supposed to be based on Tolstoy's own personality - so maybe INTp? That said, I'm not convinced that Levin's character is entirely authentic. I mean - he has to be an INTp - but at the same time his character places a great deal of importance on Se. Maybe that's just evidence of dual-seeking though. Still, I get the feeling that Tolstoy is combining reality (his own personality) and fantasy (his ideal personality) in creating Levin. I love Levin as a character, but he seems too good to be true. But maybe INTps would disagree, idk. Here's a few passages from Anna Karenina that IMO seem 'too Se' for an INTp. I would be interested to know whether any INTps relate to feeling this way.

    "So they mowed the first row. And this long row seemed particularly hard work to Levin; but when the end was reached and Tit, shouldering his scythe, began with deliberate stride returning on the tracks left by his heels in the cut grass, and Levin walked back in the same way over the space he had cut, in spite of the sweat that ran in streams over his face and fell in drops down his nose, and drenched his back as though he had been soaked in water, he felt very happy. What delighted him particularly was that now he knew he would be able to hold out.

    His pleasure was only disturbed by his row not being well cut. "I will swing less with my arm and more with my whole body," he thought, comparing Tit's row, which looked as if it had been cut with a line, with his own unevenly and irregularly lying grass.

    The first row, as Levin noticed, Tit had mowed specially quickly, probably wishing to put his master to the test, and the row happened to be a long one. The next rows were easier, but still Levin had to strain every nerve not to drop behind the peasants.

    He thought of nothing, wished for nothing, but not to be left behind the peasants, and to do his work as well as possible. He heard nothing but the swish of scythes, and saw before him Tit's upright figure mowing away, the crescent-shaped curve of the cut grass, the grass and flower heads slowly and rhythmically falling before the blade of his scythe, and ahead of him the end of the row, where would come the rest.

    Suddenly, in the midst of his toil, without understanding what it was or whence it came, he felt a pleasant sensation of chill on his hot, moist shoulders. He glanced at the sky in the interval for whetting the scythes. A heavy, lowering storm cloud had blown up, and big raindrops were falling. Some of the peasants went to their coats and put them on; others--just like Levin himself--merely shrugged their shoulders, enjoying the pleasant coolness of it.

    Another row, and yet another row, followed--long rows and short rows, with good grass and with poor grass. Levin lost all sense of time, and could not have told whether it was late or early now. A change began to come over his work, which gave him immense satisfaction. In the midst of his toil there were moments during which he forgot what he was doing, and it came all easy to him, and at those same moments his row was almost as smooth and well cut as Tit's. But so soon as he recollected what he was doing, and began trying to do better, he was at once conscious of all the difficulty of his task, and the row was badly mown.

    On finishing yet another row he would have gone back to the top of the meadow again to begin the next, but Tit stopped, and going up to the old man said something in a low voice to him. They both looked at the sun. "What are they talking about, and why doesn't he go back?" thought Levin, not guessing that the peasants had been mowing no less than four hours without stopping, and it was time for their lunch."

    "The longer Levin mowed, the oftener he felt the moments of unconsciousness in which it seemed not his hands that swung the scythe, but the scythe mowing of itself, a body full of life and consciousness of its own, and as though by magic, without thinking of it, the work turned out regular and well-finished of itself. These were the most blissful moments.

    It was only hard work when he had to break off the motion, which had become unconscious, and to think; when he had to mow round a hillock or a tuft of sorrel. The old man did this easily. When a hillock came he changed his action, and at one time with the heel, and at another with the tip of his scythe, clipped the hillock round both sides with short strokes. And while he did this he kept looking about and watching what came into his view: at one moment he picked a wild berry and ate it or offered it to Levin, then he flung away a twig with the blade of the scythe, then he looked at a quail's nest, from which the bird flew just under the scythe, or caught a snake that crossed his path, and lifting it on the scythe as though on a fork showed it to Levin and threw it away.

    For both Levin and the young peasant behind him, such changes of position were difficult. Both of them, repeating over and over again the same strained movement, were in a perfect frenzy of toil, and were incapable of shifting their position and at the same time watching what was before them."
    Last edited by Rubicon; 04-17-2008 at 11:50 AM.
    "Language is the Rubicon that divides man from beast."

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