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Thread: Dual-type theory: Is Keirsey's an exertion theory?

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    Default Dual-type theory: Is Keirsey's an exertion theory?

    From Wikisocion:
    Isabel Myers' type descriptions and David Keirsey character descriptions have several differences between them. One of the primary differences between the two models is that Myers was primarily focused on how people think and feel whereas Keirsey is focused more on how people behave. Keirsey notes that one can not directly observe that people think or feel. A second important difference is that the Myers used a linear four-factor model in her descriptions whereas Keirsey uses a systems field theory model in his descriptions. A third important difference is the emphasis Keirsey and Myers place on certain dichotomies or preferences. Keirsey believes that whether someone is observant or is introspective is a much more important distinction than whether someone is expressive (somewhat correlated to extraversion) or attentive (somewhat correlated to introversion). On the other hand, Jung, and hence Myers, placed the most emphasis on whether or not someone is extraverted or introverted. A fourth difference is the difference between 'function attitudes' in Myers-Briggs and temperament types in Keirsey’s models.
    If Keirsey uses MBTI and MBTI INTp=INTj, then the Keirsey typing of Einstein would be consistent with his INTj exertion type.

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    Do exertion extroverts behave extroverted to the point where Keirsey would recognize them as extroverts in his system?

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    That one was rethorical; I don't believe they do.

    Didn't you say at some point (probably long ago in a post now deleted) that you found Einstein's writing immensely convoluted? How do you square that fact with the constatation that he was your exertion semi-dual?

    If you ask me, he was an exertion Te/Fi type, judging by the exactitude of his writing. (Ti/Fe is more 'inductive' from what I can tell)

    I still think the best way to find out about peoples' exertion types is to see what kinds of writing they benefit from reading... of course the difficulty there is that it requires a lot of honesty on the part of the person being examined.

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    Quote Originally Posted by labcoat
    That one was rethorical; I don't believe they do.

    Didn't you say at some point (probably long ago in a post now deleted) that you found Einstein's writing immensely convoluted? How do you square that fact with the constatation that he was your exertion semi-dual?

    If you ask me, he was an exertion Te/Fi type, judging by the exactitude of his writing. (Ti/Fe is more 'inductive' from what I can tell)

    I still think the best way to find out about peoples' exertion types is to see what kinds of writing they benefit from reading... of course the difficulty there is that it requires a lot of honesty on the part of the person being examined.
    The problem was the transcendental . He interweaves that with his writing and it's mostly incomprehensible to me. I had a pretty good idea was it was his theory did, and what the world he experienced was. It was his explanation of it that was incomprehensible.

    While we're on the topic, the general relativity theory seems missing a certain element, don't you think?

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    Not an expert on relativity, nor do I know what you mean with the question.

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