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Thread: Article: Personality Not Set By 30; Changes Throughout Life

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    Default Article: Personality Not Set By 30; Changes Throughout Life

    Here's an interesting article I found about lifespan personality change. Despite the assertions of many that people are "born" with a certain disposition, the study described in this article notes that personality is not a static entity and that it undergoes significant changes throughout a person's life. Though the measurement being used isn't Socionics or MBTI, it's similar in many ways (The Big Five, if that sounds familiar). I just thought this article was thought-provoking, especially for those of us who are unsure of our types. It calls to mind the Buddhist saying, "the self is a verb."

    Here's the link: Personality Is Not Set By 30; It Can Change Throughout Life

    And here's the text if you'd just like to view it here:

    Personality Is Not Set By 30; It Can Change Throughout Life

    Science Daily — WASHINGTON Do peoples' personalities change after 30? They can, according to researchers who examined 132,515 adults age 21-60 on the personality traits known as the "Big Five": conscientiousness, agreeableness, neuroticism, openness and extraversion. These findings are reported in the May issue of the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, published by the American Psychological Association (APA).

    From this large sample of volunteers recruited and examined over the Internet, lead researchers Sanjay Srivastava, Ph.D., and Oliver P. John, Ph.D., working at the University of California at Berkeley, found that certain changes do occur in middle adulthood. Conscientiousness increased throughout the age range studied, with the biggest increases in a person's 20s; this trait is defined as being organized, planful, and disciplined, and past research has linked it to work performance and work commitments. Agreeableness increased the most during a person's 30s; this trait is defined as being warm, generous, and helpful, and has been linked to relationships and to prosocial behavior. Neuroticism declined with age for women but did not decline for men; this trait is defined in people who worry and are emotionally unstable. It has been linked to depression and other mental health problems. Openness showed small declines with age for both men and women. Finally, extraversion declined for women but did not show changes in men.

    Both neuroticism and extraversion scores were higher for younger women than for younger men. But for both of these traits and most strikingly for neuroticism the apparent sex differences diminished with age.

    Of the 132,515 participants, 54 percent were female, all lived in the U.S. or Canada, 86% were White and 14% were Asian, Black, Latino or Middle Eastern. A subset of the sample 42,578 were asked about their socioeconomic status. Of these participants, 405 (1%) said they were poor, 7,614 (18%) said they were working class, 23,024 (54%) said they were middle class and 10,718 (25%) said they were upper-middle class.

    This study contradicts an often cited view that personality traits are genetically programmed to stop changing by early adulthood. There is considerable evidence against it, say the authors. In the study, "average levels of personality traits changed gradually but systematically throughout the lifespan, sometimes even more after age 30 than before. Increasing conscientiousness and agreeableness and decreasing neuroticism in adulthood may indicate increasing maturity people becoming on the average better adapted as they get older, well into middle age."

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    Article: "Development of Personality in Early and Middle Adulthood: Set Like Plaster or Persistent Change?" Sanjay Srivastava, Ph.D., and Oliver P. John, Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley; Samuel D. Gosling, Ph.D., University of Texas, Austin; Jeff Potter, B.A., Cambridge, MA; Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Vol. 84, No. 5.

    Full text of the article is available from the APA Public Affairs Office or at http://www.apa.org/journals/psp/pres...sp8451041.html

    The American Psychological Association (APA), in Washington, DC, is the largest scientific and professional organization representing psychology in the United States and is the world's largest association of psychologists. APA's membership includes more than 150,000 researchers, educators, clinicians, consultants and students. Through its divisions in 53 subfields of psychology and affiliations with 60 state, territorial and Canadian provincial associations, APA works to advance psychology as a science, as a profession and as a means of promoting health, education and human welfare.

    Note: This story has been adapted from a news release issued by American Psychological Association.
    INFp, Intuitive subtype, Enneagram 6w5
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    ProcrastinateTomorrow's Avatar
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    I'm am 25 now it has taken me a very long time to find my type.

    Some of us have to wait until the fog clears and rather than look for reasons why we are, look for reasons why we are not a certain type.

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    wonderful. just wonderful.

    fuck em
    "If you can find out little melodies for yourself on the piano it is all very well. But if they come of themselves when you are not at the piano, then you have still greater reason to rejoice; for then the inner sense of music is astir in you. The fingers must make what the head wills, not vice versa."- Robert Schumann

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    I think it's possible to change in all the ways they describe while keeping the same personality type. I know I've definitely changed in terms of being organized, "extroverted" etc, but that doesn't mean I've changed types...duh
    Hi! I'm an ENFP. :-)

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    I just think we need to test most of our hypotheses about ourself out there in the cold scary world. Don't be such babies.
    "Those who make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities..."

    - Voltaire

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    Quote Originally Posted by LokiVanguard View Post
    I just think we need to test most of our hypotheses about ourself out there in the cold scary world. Don't be such intuiters.
    Fixed your post.

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    Just get out of your own heads is all I'm sayin.
    "Those who make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities..."

    - Voltaire

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    Creepy-male

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    Well, socionics is really intuition-heavy.

    "Look at me! I'm arguing from the standpoint of my own imagination and interpretation of reality!"
    "But dude, back in the real wo--oh, whatever. Forget it."
    "Yay! I win!"

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