• Model A

    by Published on 10-27-2014 03:23 PM     Number of Views: 9907 
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    2. Socionics,
    3. Model A,
    4. Subtypes
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    Alpha Type Subtype Descriptions
    SEI - ISFp, ILE - ENTp, LII - INTj, ESE - ESFj


    If you are new to socionics, see the Introduction to Socionics, Socionics Tests and Socionics Links and Resources pages.

    Index of type subtypes:
    Alpha
    Beta
    Gamma
    Delta



    Intuitive Logical Extravert ILE, ENTp (Ne,Ti)

    Description by V. Meged and A. Ovcharov

    Intuitive subtype Ne-ENTp (Ne-ILE)

    Appearance: Makes an impression of a detached, floating in the clouds, and childishly naïve person. Socially adept conversationalist. Reads much and is inquisitive. Willingly discusses new information with his friends and associates, shows interest in their opinion. His seemingly soft demeanor is combined with obstinacy and imperturbability when he has to defend his views. Likes to discuss things but rarely if ever ends these discussions in conflict. Often smiles at others even if they haven't provided any occasion for this. With the same smile talks about both ridiculous and serious subject matters. Usually he is kind with everyone and doesn't readily take offense at critical remarks. In his undertakings and projects he is patient, and, despite being somewhat forgetful and scattered, if he is really interested ...
    by Published on 08-12-2012 10:38 PM  Number of Views: 14053 
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    Signs of Functions of Model A

    Irina M. Eglit
    Original article:http://socionicasys.org/biblioteka/statji/znaki-funkcij
    Wikisocion: http://wikisocion.net/en/index.php?t...del_A_by_Eglit

    Keywords: TIM model of the psyche, mental function, signs of mental functions, the concept of signs of mental functions, aspects of information flow, соционика, знаки психических функций, Эглит, информационный метаболизм.

    Abstract: In this publication, we will examine the theoretical background, peculiarities of manifestations, and practical observations of signs functions of Model A. The results of this investigation will be illustrated by real examples taken from typing practice. We has also included practical recommendations for the experts on use of signs of socionics functions for the purpose of verification of TIMs.

    The signs of the functions are an important element of the type model. Initially, signs of the functions have been introduced to match the observations of the functioning of psyche of representatives of different TIMs with the theoretical model [1]. If we draw an analogy between mental functions and certain kind of virtual processors of information, the signs of the functions would pertain to the "operating system" of these processors that provides for the functioning of "working programs" of mental functions which process the information of certain aspects. It is important to note that the information aspects in themselves, as constituents of the informational flow, do not have signs in the sense that will be discussed below [4].

    Substantiation of sign notations presents a known difficulty, since it is tied to the system interactions in the socion, specifically, the operation of octave rings of the socion (groups of asymmetric interactions of TIMs − see [4, Sec. 8.3]). At present time (2007), there exists no clear theoretical basis for sign notation. There is also no consensus on sign definitions and implications. Despite this, the concept of sign notation has taken root, because it works well on a practical level and can explain phenomena of information processing that cannot be explained otherwise.

    However, not all socionics schools interpret and apply functional signs in the same ways. Due to different understandings of signs by different socionics schools, it is difficult, and sometimes even impossible, to approach this topic outside of the paradigm of a particular approach.

    The purpose of this article is to review the manifestations of signs of functions that have been observed in typing
    ...
    by Published on 08-05-2012 02:17 AM     Number of Views: 17369 
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    Model A:
    Blocks and Functions of the Socionic Model of the Psyche






    Article Contents

    I. Blocks of Model A
    II. Functions of Model A
    III. Function Dichotomies


    For related information, also see: Model A





    I. Blocks of Model A

    Model A divides into four blocks (or rows) containing two functions apiece. Each block contains one Rational and one Irrational element, one Extroverted and one Introverted element. Traditionally it is thought that the functions of each block are somehow connected and codependent with each other. Other socionists maintain that the functions manifest themselves separately.
    ...
    by Published on 12-16-2011 03:52 AM  Number of Views: 10660 
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    4. Subtypes
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    The Concept of Energy Exchanges in Model "A" and Construction of Two Main Vertical Subtypes by V.V. Meged, A.A. Ovcharov
    (The Inert/Contact Subtype System)


    See also:
    Wikisocion - Type Subtypes
    Wikisocion - Contact and Inert Subtypes by Meged and Ovcharov
    Wikisocion - On Specialization of Functions of Model A by Tsypin



    Translator's note: This article provides the theoretical underpinnings for the subtype profiles written by by Meged and Ovcharov.


    Main Article Text

    Practical experience in ...
    by Published on 10-09-2011 06:52 AM  Number of Views: 39317 
    1. Categories:
    2. Socionics,
    3. Model A,
    4. Social Progress,
    5. Small Groups,
    6. Quadra
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    Four Quadra


    A quadra is a group of four socionic types which have the same valued elements. Types in same quadra share similar or compatible strivings, unspoken values, and expectations for interaction. The socion ...
    by Published on 10-04-2011 03:34 PM  Number of Views: 9775 
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    Model A




    This article has been updated on Wikisocion
    Translated from: original article


    Model A - a model of human information processing, consisting of 8 functions, 4 strong and 4 weak. ...
    by Published on 10-01-2011 03:51 PM  Number of Views: 7199 
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    2. Socionics,
    3. Model A,
    4. Additional translation required,
    5. Small Groups

    Socionics: Typology - Small Groups
    [See attachment for full text]

    Socionics is defined and taught in many different ways. To me, it is defined as the science of types of individuals and their relationships. I would not separate it from psychology. It is the part of personality psychology that deals with personality classification, the study of relationships and laws of forming of groups with a wide spectrum of personality characteristics.


    Psychologists practicing Socionics are often asked to analyze relationships in existing groups, to build teams for certain tasks, or to review conflicts.


    Socionics has a wide spectrum of application to different areas of psychology – from career-guidance to family counseling and personal advice.

    Socionics is one of the most effective tools of self-development useful for revealing personal problems, determining strong and weak traits of one's personality and correcting behavior. Socionics allows an individual to look at oneself from outside. I have a personal conviction that every psychologist before he/she begins helping people with their problems should acquire clear understanding of him/herself and have a professional attitude towards one's own personality.


    Any expert's authority in a given sphere of knowledge depends on his/her skill of discernment of objects in the given field of study. An experienced steel maker can tell the exact metal temperature by simple observation; likewise an optic lens polisher who is an expert in his field can discern the precision of polishing by touch, and etc.


    A psychologist's expertise is revealed primarily in discerning people's characters, their motives, problems, fears and behavioral reactions. I believe that Socionics helps its practitioners to considerably progress in this direction and widen the horizons of psychology as a science in general. On the other hand, Socionics – and here I absolutely agree with Igor Kalinauskas - is a science of banalities. But the knowledge of the banal, behavioral stereotypes, of standard reactions and standard scenarios in relationships, helps to sort through and set these things aside when dealing with people and their problems.....
    by Published on 09-29-2011 09:33 PM  Number of Views: 4099 
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    4. Reinin Dichotomy

    **UPDATE (August 2015): See the attached PDF file for an updated, more thorough explanation of this topic by the author.


    Reinin dichotomies were derived using group theory, a field of math I know very little about. This site gives a thorough explanation. Unfortunately it is in Russian, and online translators obviously don't do very well with the mathematical terminology. That said, maybe misutii and any resident mathematicians could help out.

    I'll try to explain my current understanding of it as simply as possible. The idea is that the socion, with its dichotomies, is a Klein 4-group. This means, given a few initial dichotomies, you can produce all other possible symmetric dichotomies. (I'm not sure what symmetric means in this context.)

    New dichotomies can be formed by combining the original four dichotomies. If I, N, T, and J are represented by 1 (true) and their opposites by 0 (false), comparing them with the boolean operation of equivalence (=) yields new dichotomies. For instance, a type is "static" if I and J are both true or both false. Mathematically, I=J. (The above article uses the clumsy but equivalent notation (I & J) v (~I & ~J) instead.) Any other commutative (i.e. symmetric) operation, such as XOR, could also be used.

    4C2 = 6 dichotomies are formed by comparing pairs of the original four dichotomies.
    ...